4
Interface IView
{
   List<string> Names {get; set;}
}

public class Presenter
{
   public List<string> GetNames(IView view)
   {
       return view.Names;
   }
}

var mockView = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IView>();
var presenter = new Presenter();
var names = new List<string> {"Test", "Test1"};

mockView.Expect(v => v.Names).Return(names);

Assert.AreEqual(names, presenter.GetNames(mockView)) // Here presenter returns null which is incorrect behaviour in my case;

When I use the above code to return the mock list of names ,it doesn't match the expecatation then returns null and fails

thanks for your help

Edit: I am passing the view as the paramter to presenter's GetNames method.Here the problem is when i return list object from the mocked property it returns null. However when i change the property data type to string/int i.e.premitive type then value is returned correctly

2
  • "doesn't work for me" isn't a helpful error report. Please say what it's doing and why that's not what you want.
    – Jon Skeet
    Feb 26, 2009 at 16:01
  • Hi jon, I have edited the problem as you suggested
    – scorpio
    Feb 26, 2009 at 16:25

4 Answers 4

3

I don't see anywhere where your mockView is getting attached to your presenter. So from the presenter's point of view, the view is null. You might have to do something like:

presenter.View = view; 

I just coded this with NUnit and RhinoMocks 3.5 to make sure it works. Here's my two class files. The test passed.

using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace Tests
{
    public interface IView
    {
        List<string> Names { get; set; }
    }

    public class Presenter
    {
        public List<string> GetNames(IView view)
        {
            return view.Names;
        }
    }
}

using System.Collections.Generic;
using NUnit.Framework;
using Rhino.Mocks;

namespace Tests
{

    [TestFixture]
    public class TestFixture
    {
        [Test]
        public void TestForStackOverflow()
        {
            var mockView = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IView>();
            var presenter = new Presenter();
            var names = new List<string> {"Test", "Test1"};

            mockView.Expect(v => v.Names).Return(names);

            Assert.AreEqual(names, presenter.GetNames(mockView));
        }
    }
}

I can only guess you are doing something wrong with the way you've mixed up your code.

2
  • Chris, thanks for you answer but I am passing the view as the paramter to presenter's GetNames method.Here the problem is when i return list object from the mocked property it returns null. However when i change the property data type to string/int i.e.premitive type then value is returned correctly
    – scorpio
    Feb 27, 2009 at 9:39
  • Hi Chris, Thanks for your help, after investigating I found that I was creating a new list object inside the presenter with the same content of view list object, and because of this it was failing. Now I used the property constraints to match the parameters in expectation and it worked!! Thanks all
    – scorpio
    Mar 2, 2009 at 9:30
1

Thanks for your help, after investigating I found that I was creating a new list object inside the presenter with the same content of view list object, and because of this it was failing. Now I used the property constraints to match the parameters in expectation and it worked!! Thanks all

0

I'm not familiar with Rhino Mocks but I can tell you how to do this with NUnit's built-in mock library, NUnit.Mocks:

List names = new List {"Test", "Test1"};

DynamicMock mockView = new DynamicMock(typeof(IView));

mockView.ExpectAndReturn("get_Names", names);

IView view = (IView)mockView.MockInstance;

Assert.AreEqual(names, presenter.GetNames(view));

2
  • BTW, I found your answer very useful when Googling for Nunit and included it as a distinct Q/A here stackoverflow.com/questions/5331412
    – John K
    Mar 16, 2011 at 21:01
  • 1
    Glad I could help. NUnit.Mocks was my first foray into mock testing. Other frameworks are more flexible but NUnit.Mocks is convenient and capable when your not interested in adding another dependency to your test projects. Mar 17, 2011 at 16:35
0

One thing you should not forget (I know I did and it got me confused): specify how many times you want the expectation to work - otherwise if your code uses the property more than once, you will get weird results, since the expectation

mockView.Expect(v => v.Names).Return(names);

works for a single call only. So you should write

mockView.Expect(v => v.Names).Return(names).Repeat.Any();

if your mocked property is supposed to return the same stuff every time it's called.

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