20

I would like to have a 'badge' of sorts on the screen and when conditions are met, it will bounce from normal size to bigger and back to normal repeatedly until the conditions are no longer met. I cannot seem to get the badge to stop 'bouncing', though. Once it starts, it's unstoppable.

What I've tried: I have tried using a few animations, but they can be classified as animations that use 'repeatForever' to achieve the desired effect and those that do not. For example:

Animation.default.repeatForever(autoreverses: true)

and

Animation.spring(response: 1, dampingFraction: 0, blendDuration: 1)(Setting damping to 0 makes it go forever)

followed by swapping it out with .animation(nil). Doesn't seem to work. Does anyone have any ideas? Thank you so very much ahead of time! Here is the code to reproduce it:

struct theProblem: View {
    @State var active: Bool = false

    var body: some View {
        Circle()
            .scaleEffect( active ? 1.08: 1)
            .animation( active ? Animation.default.repeatForever(autoreverses: true): nil )
            .frame(width: 100, height: 100)
            .onTapGesture {
                self.active = !self.active

        }
    }
}

2 Answers 2

54

I figured it out!

An animation using .repeatForever() will not stop if you replace the animation with nil. It WILL stop if you replace it with the same animation but without .repeatForever(). ( Or alternatively with any other animation that comes to a stop, so you could use a linear animation with a duration of 0 to get a IMMEDIATE stop)

In other words, this will NOT work: .animation(active ? Animation.default.repeatForever() : nil)

But this DOES work: .animation(active ? Animation.default.repeatForever() : Animation.default)

In order to make this more readable and easy to use, I put it into an extension that you can use like this: .animation(Animation.default.repeat(while: active))

Here is an interactive example using my extension you can use with live previews to test it out:

import SwiftUI

extension Animation {
    func `repeat`(while expression: Bool, autoreverses: Bool = true) -> Animation {
        if expression {
            return self.repeatForever(autoreverses: autoreverses)
        } else {
            return self
        }
    }
}

struct TheSolution: View {
    @State var active: Bool = false
    var body: some View {
        Circle()
            .scaleEffect( active ? 1.08: 1)
            .animation(Animation.default.repeat(while: active))
            .frame(width: 100, height: 100)
            .onTapGesture {
                self.active.toggle()
            }
    }
}

struct TheSolution_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        TheSolution()
    }
}

As far as I have been able to tell, once you assign the animation, it will not ever go away until your View comes to a complete stop. So if you have a .default animation that is set to repeat forever and auto reverse and then you assign a linear animation with a duration of 4, you will notice that the default repeating animation is still going, but it's movements are getting slower until it stops completely at the end of our 4 seconds. So we are animating our default animation to a stop through a linear animation.

3
  • Thanks, I don't think I ever would've figured that out :D Dec 19, 2019 at 13:22
  • Thanks for this - I was stuck on the same problem. Have you filed a radar for this? It seems like setting the animation to nil should be sufficient, but it's not
    – Bill
    May 9, 2020 at 15:12
  • 4
    I guess after some Xcode update it no longer works for me
    – Aspid
    Jun 15, 2020 at 6:35
1

There is nothing wrong in your code, so I assume it is Apple's defect. It seems there are many with implicit animations (at least with Xcode 11.2). Anyway...

I recommend to consider alternate approach provided below that gives expected behaviour.

struct TestAnimationDeactivate: View {
    @State var active: Bool = false

    var body: some View {
        VStack {
            if active {
                BlinkBadge()
            } else {
                Badge()
            }
        }
        .frame(width: 100, height: 100)
        .onTapGesture {
            self.active.toggle()
        }
    }
}

struct Badge: View {
    var body: some View {
        Circle()
    }
}

struct BlinkBadge: View {
    @State private var animating = false
    var body: some View {
        Circle()
            .scaleEffect(animating ? 1.08: 1)
            .animation(Animation.default.repeatForever(autoreverses: true))
            .onAppear {
                self.animating = true
            }
    }
}

struct TestAnimationDeactivate_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        TestAnimationDeactivate()
    }
}
3
  • Wow, thank you! Just to make sure I am following you here, SwiftUI has some secret ninja black box stuff going on that we cannot see, or cannot see with ease. As a workaround until that is more easily solved, we can just alternate between two identical looking Shapes but one of them is bouncing and the other isn't, thus giving the illusion that the bouncing has stopped. I did notice that the animation seems to keep going even when that view isn't visible! Ha it really is unstoppable! Thank you so much for the reply!
    – The Fox
    Dec 2, 2019 at 9:11
  • Doesn't it work anymore for you? If you have own solution, please share.
    – Asperi
    Dec 3, 2019 at 5:27
  • 1
    I'm pretty sure this is the right approach. Though I kinda wish it wasn't. The WWDC21 talk on view identity gives clues to why you should take this approach to removing auto-repeating animations.
    – orj
    Oct 1, 2021 at 6:05

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