25

I have 2 tables below:

Table_1
[Group No] [Test No] [Description]
123        1         [First Test]
123        2         [Second Test]
123        3         [Third Test]

Table_2
[Sample No] [Test No] [Result Description]
ABC         1         [Some More Result]
ABC         3         [Some Result]
DEF         1         [A Result]
DEF         2         [Results More]
DEF         3         [Bad Results]

Here's my query:

SELECT Table_1.[Group No], Table_1.[Test No], Table_1.Description, Table_2.[Result Description]
FROM Table_1 
LEFT OUTER JOIN Table_2 ON Table_1.[Test No] = Table_2.[Test No]
WHERE (Table_1.[Group No] = '123') AND (Table_2.[Sample No] = 'ABC')

djacobson's query:

SELECT Table_1.[Group No], Table_1.[Test No], Table_1.Description, Table_2.[Result Description]
FROM Table_1 
LEFT OUTER JOIN Table_2 ON Table_1.[Test No] = Table_2.[Test No]
WHERE (Table_1.[Group No] = '123') 
  AND (Table_2.[Sample No] IS NULL OR Table_2.[Sample No] = 'ABC')

This returns:

[Group No] [Test No] [Description] [Result Description]
123        1         [First Test]  [Some More Result]
123        3         [Third Test]  [Some Result]

But what I really want is:

[Group No] [Test No] [Description] [Result Description]
123        1         [First Test]  [Some More Result]
123        2         [Second Test] NULL
123        3         [Third Test]  [Some Result]

Is this possible? I would like to return the record with Test No 2. However, how do I join to a record which is non-existent? Or is this simply not possible? What are the alternatives?

44

Despite correctly using an outer join, you are then restricting the resultset to cases where a value is present in Table_2 by including a column from that table in your WHERE clause. If you want records where the Sample No. is ABC, OR there is no record in Table_2, you need to do this:

SELECT Table_1.[Group No], Table_1.[Test No], Table_1.Description, Table_2.[Result Description]
FROM Table_1 
LEFT OUTER JOIN Table_2 ON Table_1.[Test No] = Table_2.[Test No]
WHERE (Table_1.[Group No] = '123') 
  AND (Table_2.[Sample No] IS NULL OR Table_2.[Sample No] = 'ABC')

Alternatively, you can filter the results from Table_2 when joining to it (which, in this case, reads a little more cleanly):

SELECT Table_1.[Group No], Table_1.[Test No], Table_1.Description, Table_2.[Result Description]
FROM Table_1 
LEFT OUTER JOIN Table_2 ON Table_1.[Test No] = Table_2.[Test No] AND Table_2.[Sample No] = 'ABC'
WHERE (Table_1.[Group No] = '123') 

That should accomplish the same thing. The important takeaway here is that the WHERE clause filters the results of joining your tables. If you're using outer joins but want to filter on the outer-joined tables, you must handle the case where no record exists on the far side of the join.

  • Hi djacobson, this still yields the same results, I still don't get the row with Test No 2. Is it something to do with the JOIN? – KayBee May 6 '11 at 16:07
  • That's odd... Precisely what query are you using now? Please edit your question to include it (you can use source-code formatting in the question, but not in a comment). – Dan J May 6 '11 at 16:09
  • Hi djacobson, the second query seems to have yielded the results required. I've edited my original question including the first query you have suggested - this didn't work, but the second one did. – KayBee May 6 '11 at 16:15
  • Ah, I tested this and understand why the first query excludes test 2: Because it doesn't filter Table_2 when joining, we get a record for test 2 joined to sample DEF. We then filter the results for those that contain no sample, or use sample ABC, so that record for test 2 is excluded. (The easiest way to see what's going on is to do a SELECT * from the joined tables with no WHERE clause). So filtering Table_2 when we join, and then filtering for Group after the join, is the way to go! – Dan J May 6 '11 at 16:36
  • Thank you, that is the answer! I should remember that filtering in the WHERE clause restricts the view and that I should be doing it wihin the FROM clause, correct? – KayBee May 6 '11 at 17:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.