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I run in this situation where Destroy() is never called.

unit Unit2;

interface

type

// Interface
ITest = Interface(IInterface)
 function IsTrue() : Boolean;
end;

TmyClass = class(TInterfacedObject, ITest)
  public
    // Interface implementation
    function IsTrue() : Boolean;

    constructor Create();
    destructor Destroy(); override;
end;

implementation

constructor TmyClass.Create();
begin
  inherited Create();
end;

destructor TmyClass.Destroy();
begin
  inherited Destroy();
end;

published
  // Property
  property IsItTrue: Boolean read IsTrue;
end.

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages, System.SysUtils, System.Variants, 
  System.Classes, Vcl.Graphics, Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, 
  Vcl.Dialogs, Vcl.StdCtrls, unit2;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
  Button1: TButton;
  procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
  procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
private
  { Private declarations }
public
  { Public declarations }
end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;
  fMyClass: TmyClass;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  fMyClass.Free;  // if refcount = 0 this works, if refcount <> 0 pointer error.
  //or
  fMyClass := Nil; // no error but Destroy wil not be executed
  Close();
end;

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  fMyClass := TMyClass.Create();
end;
end.

Reading this article, there is only a constructor but no destructor implemented.

Is there any particular reason for this?

And should I release (if needed) all other objects that will be defined in myClass by implementing a finalization section?

  • The class in the article doesn't have any resources that should be cleaned up and so doesn't need to override the destructor. You should find out why your destructor is not called. – Sertac Akyuz Dec 2 at 14:23
  • Your question as-is is unanswerable. There is no minimal reproducible example so we cannot tell why your destructor is not called. Whether you need to override default destructor is another question and it depends on what kind of fields you have declared in your class and how you are using them. – Dalija Prasnikar Dec 2 at 14:32
  • There seem to be two separate questions here: 1) Does the TInterfacedObject need its destructor overridden, and 2) Why your destructor is never called. But the rule of thumb is yes, it will essentially work like other objects for the most part, so if you create / initialize anything in the constructor, or need any cleanup in general, then you need to destroy it in the destructor. Why the destructor is never called, hard to say without seeing enough code. – Jerry Dodge Dec 2 at 14:35
  • TInterfacedObject is reference counted. The declaration of your class is fine (provided you only ever deal with IInterface variables), but if you don't ever assign object instances of your class to interface variables then the reference count won't be managed correctly so the destructor won't be called. Please show an example of how you are actually using the class, them someone can explain why it is not working properly. – Remy Lebeau Dec 2 at 15:14
  • @Remy The original class and api has to many code to publish here. So, I thought to simplify the issue. Although I must say that the Interface is really an IMFSourceReaderCallback. But implementation of this interface is the same way as in my simple sample. I don't get rid of the referencecount initialized on Create() it stays 2. – ToKa Dec 2 at 21:46
1

Your fMyClass variable is an object reference, not an interface, so it does not participate in TInterfaceObject's reference counting.

You need to change this:

fMyClass: TmyClass;

to this:

fMyClass: ITest;

And then you can get rid of fMyClass.Free; altogether:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages, System.SysUtils, System.Variants, 
  System.Classes, Vcl.Graphics, Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, 
  Vcl.Dialogs, Vcl.StdCtrls, unit2;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
  Button1: TButton;
  procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
  procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
private
  { Private declarations }
public
  { Public declarations }
end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;
  fMyClass: ITest;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  fMyClass := nil; // no error and Destroy will be executed
  Close();
end;

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  fMyClass := TMyClass.Create();
end;

end.

fMyClass := nil; will invoke reference counting only if fMyClass is an interface variable, not an object reference, and you can't call Free() on an interface variable.

  • Thank you Remy. I missed that completely. – ToKa Dec 2 at 22:55
6

The most likely reason for the destructor not being called would be because you don't assign your object to an interface variable.

procedure Test1;
var
  vMyObj : TObject;
begin
  vMyObj := myclass.Create;
end; <-Destructor NOT called here

procedure Test2;
var
  vMyIntf : IInterface;
begin
  vMyIntf := myclass.Create;
end; <-Destructor IS called here.

If that's the case, I invite you to read this answer for more information.

  • If this guess is correct, then the question is dupe – David Heffernan Dec 2 at 16:01
  • The declaration is 'var fMyClass: myClass;' and it is created as follows: 'fmyClass := MyClass.Create();' Embarcadero says: "use TInterfacedObject as a base class because it implements the methods of IInterface." So, that is what I did though? – ToKa Dec 2 at 16:35
  • 1
    @ToKa Interface variables and object variables are 2 different things. Whether the variable is declared as TObject or as myclass doesn't change the fact that it is still an object variable and not an interface one. If you change your declaration to var fMyClass : IInterface, you will see your destructor is properly called when the variable is set to nil (either implicitly, or explicitly) – Ken Bourassa Dec 2 at 16:47
  • @Ken I think we have a misunderstanding here. For instance: If I would add a field in the public field of the class, like 'sMyFileName: string;', and in the form a call like 'fMyClass.sMyFileName := 'True.txt'', the compiler reports: "fMyClass.sMyFileName does not contain a member etc..". The issue with the original source code, which is to big to drop here, keeps the reference count on 2. The reference count is initialized directly when Create() is initialized. All other objects initialized are counting up but can be freed before destruction. >> – ToKa Dec 2 at 21:41
  • >> However.. the initial reference count stays 2 and that will generate a pointer error on destruction. I have no clue why. – ToKa Dec 2 at 21:41

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