-1

I have this code which works on Chrome, Safari, Firefox, etc.:

var questions = qnumbers.map((i, el) => ({
            number: el.innerHTML,
            text: qtext[i].innerHTML,
            feedback: qfeedback[i].innerHTML,
            lessonid: strLESSONID.toString(),
            sessionid: strSESSIONID.toString(),
            userid: strUSERID.toString(),
            correctanswer: qcorrectanswer[i].innerHTML,
            studentanswer: qstudentanswer[i].innerHTML
        })).get();

Only thing it doesn't work on is IE -_- and I KNOW it is because of the '=>' but I am attempting to rewrite the code to not include it but it doesn't seem to be working? That is the part I need help with, NOT why it is happening... So don't close my question again please.

Here is the code that I have tried to change it to, but to no avail, I have JQUERY too so we can use that if necessary.

var questions = qnumbers.map(function(i, el){
            number: el.innerHTML,
            text: qtext[i].innerHTML,
            feedback: qfeedback[i].innerHTML,
            lessonid: strLESSONID.toString(),
            sessionid: strSESSIONID.toString(),
            userid: strUSERID.toString(),
            correctanswer: qcorrectanswer[i].innerHTML,
            studentanswer: qstudentanswer[i].innerHTML      
        }).get();

I get syntax error: 'expecting ; on line text: qtext[i].innerHTML'

Thank you!

  • 3
    In a plain function you'll need a return statement. – Pointy Dec 2 at 15:23
3

You need to return an object:

var questions = qnumbers.map(function(i, el){
        return {
          number: el.innerHTML,
          text: qtext[i].innerHTML,
          feedback: qfeedback[i].innerHTML,
          lessonid: strLESSONID.toString(),
          sessionid: strSESSIONID.toString(),
          userid: strUSERID.toString(),
          correctanswer: qcorrectanswer[i].innerHTML,
          studentanswer: qstudentanswer[i].innerHTML
        }      
    }).get();

when you write function() {}, the brackets, {}, do not represent the start and end of an object, they represent the start and end of the function. Normal javascript functions have no concept of an implicitly returned value - you have to return something. Only arrow functions can have that implicitly returned value syntax, () => obj

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