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I'm having some unexpected behaviour in R with function arrays, and I've reduced the problem to a minimal working example:

theory = c(function(p) p)

i = 1
posterior = function(p) theory[[i]](p)
i = 2

posterior(0)

Which gives me an error saying the subscript i is out of bounds.

So I guess that i is somehow being used as a "free" variable in the definition of posterior so it gets updated when I redefine i. Oddly enough, this works:

theory = c(function(p) p)

i = 1
posterior = theory[[i]]
i = 2

posterior(0)

How can I avoid this? Note that not redefining i is not an option, as this stuff is going in a for loop where i is the index.

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    It's not clear what you're trying to accomplish here. The error is due to referencing an index that doesn't exist in your function and would be expected. What your function does isn't different than c(1)[[2]] – manotheshark Dec 2 '19 at 15:56
  • @manotheshark Right, so I'm asking if there's a way to get R to immediately evaluate posterior rather than do so lazily. – Abhimanyu Pallavi Sudhir Dec 2 '19 at 15:59
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    I think a simpler example is possible. f = function() letters[i]. Since [i] is not defined in the function or passed in as an argument, the function will look at its parent environments when it is called for a value of i. The function is the same whether or not i is defined before the function. The function will check for a value of i when it is called. – Gregor - reinstate Monica Dec 2 '19 at 16:01
  • Ah ok. So I just need to pass i as a variable to the function. Thanks @Gregor. – Abhimanyu Pallavi Sudhir Dec 2 '19 at 16:02
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    That would work well---assuming you can pass the value of i that you want at the time you call it. Otherwise, I would point you to reading about functionals rather than about lazy evaluation. – Gregor - reinstate Monica Dec 2 '19 at 16:04
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The reason that this doesn't work is that you redefine i = 2, and then you are out of bounds of theory, which contains a single element. The function is evaluated lazily, so that it only executes theory[[i]] when the function is called, at which point i equals 2.

You can read some more about lazy evaluation here.

  • I figured that's what's going on, but how can I fix it? Can I "turn off" lazy evaluation? – Abhimanyu Pallavi Sudhir Dec 2 '19 at 15:58
  • You can't simply 'turn off' lazy evaluation, unfortunately. Depending on exactly what you want to do there might be more or less idiomatic ways of getting around the problem. – SDS0 Dec 2 '19 at 16:05

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