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I have several Windows applications that read a file path from command-line arguments. Everything works flawlessly, except when passing paths with non-ANSI characters. I expected this, but don't know how to deal with it. Probably an entry-level question but that is driving me crazy.

My current code looks like:

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    namespace po = boost::program_options;

    po::options_description po_desc("Allowed options");
    po_desc.add_options()
        ("file", po::value<std::string>(), "path to file");

    po::variables_map po_vm;
    try {
        po::store(po::parse_command_line(argc, argv, po_desc), po_vm);
        po::notify(po_vm);
    } catch (...) {
        std::cout << po_desc << std::endl;
        return false;
    }

    const std::string file_path = po_vm["file"].as<std::string>();

    // ...
}

I've found that if I replace the type of file_path from std::string to boost::filesystem::path, some paths are now read. I don't know exactly why but can deduce that it has to be with a translation from the Latin1 charset.

For example, having following files:

malaga.txt
málaga.txt
mąlaga.txt

The first is always read correctly, while the second one fails when using std::string file_path but not boost::filesystem::path file_path. The third one always fails.

I've tried switching the main function to int main(int argc, wchar_t* argv) and using std::wstring for the argument type, but it is not compatible with boost::program_options parser.

How can I correctly read such Unicode file names?

4
  • Have you read Unicode Support boost.org/doc/libs/1_71_0/doc/html/program_options/… Dec 2, 2019 at 17:45
  • Maybe you need to chcp 65001 first?
    – daxim
    Dec 2, 2019 at 18:25
  • Setting the console codepage via chcp.com has nothing do with this. The native command line in Windows is Unicode (UTF-16LE). The issue is that the C runtime's main entry point parses the ANSI encoding of the command line from GetCommandLineA instead of the Unicode command line from GetCommandLineW. The non-standard wmain entry point is based on the native Unicode command line. The wchar_t strings could then be encoded as UTF-8 via WideCharToMultiByte if the application needs byte strings.
    – Eryk Sun
    Dec 2, 2019 at 18:59
  • Thanks every one, your comments have been very useful!
    – cbuchart
    Dec 3, 2019 at 9:11

1 Answer 1

2

Thanks for everyone contributing with their comments, thanks to them I managed to solved my problem.

TL;DR

Here the fixed code:

int wmain(int argc, wchar_t* argv[]) { // <<<
    namespace po = boost::program_options;

    po::options_description po_desc("Allowed options");
    po_desc.add_options()
        ("file", po::wvalue<std::wstring>(), "path to file") // <<<
        ("ansi", po::value<std::string>(), "an ANSI string")
        ;

    po::variables_map po_vm;
    try {
        po::store(po::wcommand_line_parser(argc, argv) // <<<
                    .options(po_desc)
                    .run(),
                  po_vm);
        po::notify(po_vm);
    } catch (...) {
        std::cout << po_desc << std::endl;
        return false;
    }

    const boost::filesystem::path file_path = po_vm["file"].as<std::wstring>(); // <<<

    // ...
}

Explanation

First, switch to wmain and wchar_t* argv: as mentioned by @erik-sun, it is necessary to switch the entry point to an Unicode aware function. Important note: it is possible to use int main(int, wchar_t*) (in the sense it will compile) but it won't receive arguments with the correct codification and parser will fail, you have to use wmain.

Then, the Unicode support link provided by @richard-critten was very useful for understanding the compilation errors:

  • use boost::program_options::wvalue when the type is wide-char. The internal implementation uses a string stream: the default one only works with 8-bits chars.
  • use boost::program_options::wcommand_line_parser to accept wchar_t* arguments. Unfortunately, this class doesn't have an all-in-one constructor and you must use the long form for parsing the command line.
  • finally, retrieve the value as std::wstring when needed.

I've extended the code snippet to show it is still compatible with std::string inputs.

Side note

My complete solution requires instantiating a Qt QApplication at some point. QApplication constructor is incompatible with the wide-char argv. As no command-line interaction is needed with the Qt part (everything is processed long before by Boost), it can be re-written to receiv fake arguments:

int fake_argc = 1;
char* fake_argv[] = {"AplicationName"};
QApplication a(fake_argc, fake_argv);

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