2

Let's say I've got a nested dictionary of the form:

{'geo': {'bgcolor': 'white','lakecolor': 'white','caxis': {'gridcolor': 'white', 'linecolor': 'white',}},
 'title': {'x': 0.05},
 'yaxis': {'automargin': True,'linecolor': 'white','zerolinecolor': 'white','zerolinewidth': 2}
 }

How can you work your way through that dict and make a list of each complete key path that contains the value 'white'? Using a function defined by user jfs in the post Search for a value in a nested dictionary python lets you check whether or not 'white' occurs at least one time and also returns the path:

# dictionary
    d={'geo': {'bgcolor': 'white','lakecolor': 'white','caxis': {'gridcolor': 'white', 'linecolor': 'white',}},
    'title': {'x': 0.05},
    'yaxis': {'automargin': True,'linecolor': 'white','ticks': '','zerolinecolor': 'white','zerolinewidth': 2}
  }

# function:
def getpath(nested_dict, value, prepath=()):
    for k, v in nested_dict.items():
        path = prepath + (k,)
        if v == value: # found value
            return path
        elif hasattr(v, 'items'): # v is a dict
            p = getpath(v, value, path) # recursive call
            if p is not None:
                return p
getpath(d,'white')

# out:
('geo', 'bgcolor')

But 'white' occurs other places too, like in :

1. d['geo']['lakecolor']

2: d['geo']['caxis']['gridcolor']

3: d['yaxis']['linecolor']

How can I make sure that the function finds all paths?

I've tried applying the function above until it returns none while eliminating found paths one by one, but that quickly turned into an ugly mess.

Thank you for any suggestions!

5

This is a perfect use case to write a generator:

def find_paths(haystack, needle):
    if haystack == needle:
        yield ()
    if not isinstance(haystack, dict):
        return
    for key, val in haystack.items():
        for subpath in find_paths(val, needle):
            yield (key, *subpath)

You can use it as follows:

d = {
    'geo': {'bgcolor': 'white','lakecolor': 'white','caxis': {'gridcolor': 'white', 'linecolor': 'white',}},
    'title': {'x': 0.05},
    'yaxis': {'automargin': True,'linecolor': 'white','ticks': '','zerolinecolor': 'white','zerolinewidth': 2}
}

# you can iterate over the paths directly...
for path in find_paths(d, 'white'):
    print('found at path: ', path)

# ...or you can collect them into a list:
paths = list(find_paths(d, 'white'))
print('found at paths: ' + repr(paths))

The generator approach has the advantage that it doesn't need to create an object to keep all paths in memory at once; they can be processed one by one and immediately discarded. In this case, the memory savings would be rather modest, but in others they may be significant. Also, if a loop iterating over a generator is terminated early, the generator is not going to keep searching for more paths that would be later discarded anyway.

  • Great answer! Welcome to the forum by the way. I'm really looking forward to you future contributions! – vestland Dec 3 '19 at 11:04
1

just transform your function so it returns a list and don't return when something is found. Just add to/extend the list

def getpath(nested_dict, value, prepath=()):
    p = []
    for k, v in nested_dict.items():
        path = prepath + (k,)
        if v == value: # found value
            p.append(path)
        elif hasattr(v, 'items'): # v is a dict
            p += getpath(v, value, path) # recursive call
    return p

with your input data, this produces (order may vary depending on python versions where dictionaries are unordered):

[('yaxis', 'linecolor'), ('yaxis', 'zerolinecolor'), ('geo', 'lakecolor'), 
('geo', 'caxis', 'linecolor'), ('geo', 'caxis', 'gridcolor'), ('geo', 'bgcolor')]
0

Returning is what makes the result incomplete. Instead of returning, use a separate list to track your paths. I'm using list cur_list here, and returning it at the very end of the loop:

d = {
  'geo': {'bgcolor': 'white',
         'caxis': {'gridcolor': 'white', 'linecolor': 'white'},
         'lakecolor': 'white'},
  'title': {'x': 0.05},
  'yaxis': {'automargin': True,
           'linecolor': 'white',
           'ticks': '',
           'zerolinecolor': 'white',
           'zerolinewidth': 2}
}

cur_list = []

def getpath(nested_dict, value, prepath=()):
    for k, v in nested_dict.items():
        path = prepath + (k,)
        if v == value: # found value
            cur_list.append(path)
        elif isinstance(v, dict): # v is a dict
            p = getpath(v, value, path, cur_list) # recursive call
            if p is not None:
                cur_list.append(p)

getpath(d,'white')
print(cur_list)


# RESULT:
# [('geo', 'bgcolor'), ('geo', 'caxis', 'gridcolor'), ('geo', 'caxis', 'linecolor'), ('geo', 'lakecolor'), ('yaxis', 'linecolor'), ('yaxis', 'zerolinecolor')]
  • well, it doesn't work for me. I get self referenced lists because you're using a mutable argument that accumulates, also you're appending lists not elements: [('yaxis', 'linecolor'), ('yaxis', 'zerolinecolor'), [...], [...], ('geo', 'caxis', 'linecolor'), ('geo', 'caxis', 'gridcolor'), [...], ('geo', 'lakecolor'), ('geo', 'bgcolor'), [...]] – Jean-François Fabre Dec 2 '19 at 21:05
  • I took cur_list out of the definition and made it external again. – JacobIRR Dec 2 '19 at 21:12

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