0

I want to create a patch from the differences between my local code and the remote origin.

I do this with:

git diff origin/myTestBranch > myPatch.patch 

I go into a separate dir that cloned the same repo and has just pulled myTestBranch. I do so with

cd testPatchRepo
git clone ....
git checkout myTestBranch

When I try to apply the patch - it fails!

However, if I commit my work and create a patch with git diff firstCommit ^...lastCommit > myPatch.patch the patch applies with no issues...This doesn't solve my question, because I still want to be able to create a patch from my local, uncommitteed work.

Here is the patch created from local, uncommitted work:

 diff --git a/scripts b/scripts
index 8640468..adfabd7 160000
--- a/scripts
+++ b/scripts
@@ -1 +1 @@
-Subproject commit 8640468cc4ba87bebee0e9e26939361bcb3e3afa
+Subproject commit adfabd7bf11566f2888a4501bc557265f1172ac2-dirty
diff --git a/source/tutorial/install.txt b/source/tutorial/install.txt
index 5fee5f6..5ef6e4b 100644
--- a/source/tutorial/install.txt
+++ b/source/tutorial/install.txt
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ Install {+bi-short+} on Windows

 .. include:: /includes/fact-bi-enterprise.rst

-Massaddie
+Maaaaassaddie
 To set up |bi|,
 follow the steps on this page.

The patch created after committing my change:

commit 983393a03262f8dccfd90b3c948751846ae583ae
Author: maddie <myemail>
Date:   Mon Dec 2 17:17:42 2019 -0500

    commit before make stage commit

diff --git a/source/tutorial/install.txt b/source/tutorial/install.txt
index 5fee5f6..5ef6e4b 100644
--- a/source/tutorial/install.txt
+++ b/source/tutorial/install.txt
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ Install {+bi-short+} on Windows

 .. include:: /includes/fact-bi-enterprise.rst

-Massaddie
+Maaaaassaddie
 To set up |bi| with a business intelligence tool such as Tableau,
 follow the steps on this page.
  • Run git pull --rebase origin ... (... needs to be replaced with the branch name on a remote) before creating a patch. Also, do you really have a remote branch called myTestBranch? How did you clone and switch to it? – 0andriy Dec 2 '19 at 21:11
  • its actually caled test2, but fot the purposes of the post I gave it a better name. I fork a repo, clone it and switch to the branch with git checkout test2 – maddie Dec 2 '19 at 21:13
  • I want to be able to do a git diff of whatever I have locally - even uncommitted work. git pull --rebase origin/.... requires all my changes be committed or stashed – maddie Dec 2 '19 at 21:13
  • My point is that your base is not the same as on the cloned repo. – 0andriy Dec 2 '19 at 21:14
  • is there a way to verify that their bases are different before doing git pull --rebase? – maddie Dec 2 '19 at 21:18
2

While in general you can apply the output of git diff to another working tree, in this case you can't. The reason is that git diff shows that your submodule is dirty: that is, it has uncommitted changes. Since there's no way to represent these changes in the diff as it stands, any attempt to apply them will fail.

If you want to exclude these submodule changes, you can use git diff --ignore-submodules, which will ignore your submodules, whether modified or not. If you want to include them recursively, you can use git diff --submodule=diff. That patch won't update the submodule commits themselves, though it will change the submodule working tree, so it's not recommended.

Both of those should produce appliable patches.

| improve this answer | |
  • Strangely, I am not getting applicable patches from either of those commands. I still get "error searching for..." when I do git apply -v mypatch.patch – maddie Dec 3 '19 at 1:53
  • Perhaps because the patch includes changes to local, unpushed commits - which the remote version doesn't have (and therefore cant find) – maddie Dec 3 '19 at 1:56
  • also im slightly confused - im not using submodules – maddie Dec 3 '19 at 3:31
  • @maddie You do — the directory scripts at the root of the main repo is a submodule, currently dirty (there is a new non pushed commit); you should push it and pull at the place where you're trying to apply the patch. – phd Dec 3 '19 at 12:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.