0

I have a text file that contains 10,000 lines of numbers like this:

0 1076 1198 1722 1318 1642 9118 
1 6367 461 4772 1324 1735 487 5668 
2 4412 1028 209 3130 6902 8397 4373 905 3833 2403 
3 5103 1203 7063 4590 5866 445 5498 6217 6498 7298 
4 5544 1377 2284 3187 7931 5280 9572 7221 1916 9608 
5 2598 9480 7989 1904 845 6514 1200 8699 6214 3216 942 7870 6685 4430 5532 3128 9298 
6 9770 1223 8758 6103 9560 356 8469 3570 1178 3626 2985 8780

I want to use the number at index 0 as the key, and the rest of the numbers on the same line as the values assigned to that key. I thought I could make the program read the file line-by-line, then manually assign index 0 as the key, but I am unsure on the Clojure syntax for it.

  • Which part specifically do you need help with? What have you tried so far? Try reading the files in line by line, then looping over each line using map. – Carcigenicate Dec 2 at 21:48
  • @Carcigenicae I'm not sure on what's the proper syntax to loop through the file line-by-line. I'm new to Clojure and so far my attempts only end up printing the whole file but not properly creating a map from it. – tokyolerd Dec 2 at 21:52
  • 1
    Try line-seq, or clojure.string.split-lines. See the examples on the pages. – Carcigenicate Dec 2 at 22:11
  • Thanks for the advice @Carcigenicate. I tried doing that but I'm having trouble understanding the manipulation. – tokyolerd Dec 3 at 22:01
3

i would propose the following (quick and dirty) approach:

we read file line by line, reading each line by edn reader. each line is processed like this:

(defn process-line [line-str]
  (let [[x & xs] (clojure.edn/read-string (str "[" line-str "]"))]
    [x (vec xs)]))

user> (process-line "1 2 3 4 5")
;;=> [1 [2 3 4 5]]

now we just need to read-and-process every line, and then assemble it all into a map:

user> (->> "/home/leetwin/dev/input.txt"
           clojure.java.io/reader
           line-seq
           (map process-line)
           (into {}))

output:

{0 [1076 1198 1722 1318 1642 9118],
 1 [6367 461 4772 1324 1735 487 5668],
 2 [4412 1028 209 3130 6902 8397 4373 905 3833 2403],
 3 [5103 1203 7063 4590 5866 445 5498 6217 6498 7298],
 4 [5544 1377 2284 3187 7931 5280 9572 7221 1916 9608],
 5 [2598 9480 7989 1904 845 6514 1200 8699 6214 3216 942 7870 6685 4430 5532 3128 9298],
 6 [9770 1223 8758 6103 9560 356 8469 3570 1178 3626 2985 8780]}

Also, you may want to filter out invalid/empty lines, or something else, so you just plug filtering out invalid lines into the pipeline:

user> (->> "/home/leetwin/dev/input.txt"
           clojure.java.io/reader
           line-seq
           (remove clojure.string/blank?)
           (map process-line)
           (into {}))
  • Your solution worked. Thanks a lot. If you don't mind me asking, I have two questions: Is it possible to store the map into a variable? I try to (def [varname] ) but I get a "wrong number of args" error. If it is possible to store the map, can you sort the map by the value of the keys? – tokyolerd Dec 3 at 23:04
  • @tokyolerd the former is (def my-name (->> ...) , to achieve the latter, take a look at sorted-map, in your case you need to replace the last line with (into (sorted-map)) – leetwinski Dec 4 at 9:09
  • Awesome. I tried to play around a bit more with it by putting everything into a function, but it throws an illegalArgumentException. I'll have to do more research into it. I wanted to use the map to do a PageRank calculation, but it seems my original approach was incorrect. Thanks for all your help. – tokyolerd 14 hours ago
2
(->> lines
     str/split-lines
     (map str/trim)
     (map #(str/split % #"\s+"))
     (map (fn [line] (map #(Integer/parseInt %) line)))
     (reduce (fn [state [head & tail]] (assoc state head tail)) {}))
  1. Split the lines so we get a sequence of strings
  2. Clean up the lines so we have a sequence of numbers
    1. Trim the line to ignore empty lines
    2. Split on Space so each line is now a sequence of string numbers
    3. Parse each line to an Integer sequence
  3. Reduce each line into a map by taking the head of the sequence as the key and the rest as the values.
0

Here is one way to do it:

(ns tst.demo.core
  (:use demo.core tupelo.core tupelo.test)
  (:require
    [tupelo.core :as t]
    [schema.core :as s]
    [clojure.string :as str]
    [tupelo.string :as ts]
    [tupelo.parse :as tp]
    ))

(def src-string
 "0 1076 1198 1722 1318 1642 9118
  1 6367 461 4772 1324 1735 487 5668
  2 4412 1028 209 3130 6902 8397 4373 905 3833 2403
  3 5103 1203 7063 4590 5866 445 5498 6217 6498 7298
  4 5544 1377 2284 3187 7931 5280 9572 7221 1916 9608
  5 2598 9480 7989 1904 845 6514 1200 8699 6214 3216 942 7870 6685 4430 5532 3128 9298
  6 9770 1223 8758 6103 9560 356 8469 3570 1178 3626 2985 8780
 " )

(defn line->map
  [line]
  (let [tokens-str (str/split line #"\s+")
        tokens-num (mapv tp/parse-int tokens-str)
        key        (first tokens-num)
        vals       (vec (rest tokens-num))
        result-map {key vals}]
    ;(spyx tokens-str)
    ;(spyx tokens-num)
    ;(spyx result-map)
    result-map))

(dotest
  (let [filename "/tmp/dummy.txt"
        >>       (spit filename src-string)
        str-in   (slurp filename)
        >>       (assert (= src-string str-in))
        lines    (remove str/blank?
                   (mapv str/trim
                     (str/split-lines str-in)))
        line-maps (mapv line->map lines)
        result (into {} line-maps) ]
    ; (spyx-pretty lines )
    (spyx-pretty result)
    result
    ) )

with result:

result =>
{0 [1076 1198 1722 1318 1642 9118],
 1 [6367 461 4772 1324 1735 487 5668],
 2 [4412 1028 209 3130 6902 8397 4373 905 3833 2403],
 3 [5103 1203 7063 4590 5866 445 5498 6217 6498 7298],
 4 [5544 1377 2284 3187 7931 5280 9572 7221 1916 9608],
 5 [2598 9480 7989 1904 845 6514 1200 8699 6214 3216 942 7870 6685 4430 5532 3128 9298],
 6 [9770 1223 8758 6103 9560 356 8469 3570 1178 3626 2985 8780]}
  • This and many of your other solutions are undisclosed self promotions of your tupelo library. I don't have any problems with using your own open source library to solve a problem if it provides a clear benefit, but I don't see that here. It's also somewhat misleading for new Clojure developers because it's not clear which code is from the core clojure lib and which code is from your own libary e.g. dotest, spyx. – Christian Gonzalez 2 days ago

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