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I want to design a 'survey' inspired by a flow chart and I can't understand why it's not working. I want something simple without packages since I haven't wrapped my head around them yet.

How it should work:

Q1 - input is yes -> Q2 - input yes - Q3 -> input yes - ... - Q9 - input no -> Q10

Q1 - input is no -> break

Q1 - input maybe -> Q1 AGAIN

When I currently input anything different from yes or no it starts from the beginning (Q1).. can I make it repeat the IF statement in all the questions until input is yes or no??

while True:
    x = input ('question_text' )
    if x.lower () == 'yes':
        x = input ( 'question2_text' )
        if x.lower () == 'yes':
            x = input ( 'question3_text' )
            if x.lower () == 'yes':
                          ETC... 
            if x.lower () == 'no':
                print ( 'No.' )
                break
            else:
                print ('ONLY YES/NO')
        if x.lower () == 'no':
            print ( 'No.' )
            break
        else:
            print ('ONLY YES/NO')
    if x.lower () == 'no':
        print ( 'No.' )
        break
    else:
        print ('ONLY YES/NO')
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  • No, you cannot restart an if. I would suggest implementing a state machine: a variable holds current state (e.g. list of things user entered so far) and while loop which first checks current state and then asks for one input, which depends on the current state. – zvone Dec 3 at 1:04
  • so not like while = True? should I nest them into separate while loops? – dezastrologu Dec 3 at 1:06
  • I agree with @zvone. This is an application for a state machine. It's first year or second year of a computer science course (I don't remember), so you can find lots of tutorial content. State machines are the programmatic implementation of flow charts (which computer science people like to call graphs), at least speaking roughly. See dev.to/karn/building-a-simple-state-machine-in-python – Tim Richardson Dec 3 at 1:10
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I like the first answer by luigibertaco but maybe you are looking for something a little different.

Tried to use your format so I put each question in a while loop that will keep asking the same thing until "yes" or "no" is entered.

stop_while = True
while stop_while:
    q_one = True
    while q_one:
        x = input('question_text')
        if x.lower() == 'yes':
            break
        if x.lower() == 'no':
            q_one = False
    if q_one:
        pass
    else:
        break
    q_two = True
    while q_two:
        x2 = input('question2_text')
        if x2.lower() == 'yes':
            break
        if x2.lower() == 'no':
            q_two = False
        stop_while = False
stop_while = False
  • this is more 'dumbed down' and something I could work with! I don't want functions just for the sake of using functions - I can print things based on the answer with this as well. but it still seems I cannot base a question on the answer you get on the previous one.. – dezastrologu Dec 3 at 1:23
  • and this is also not breaking the entire program/code if I say no in the first question like in my example. and if I keep saying no it's stuck in a neverbreaking loop of question1_text and question2_text – dezastrologu Dec 3 at 1:30
  • Good catch, I edited the answer to add stop_while = False at the very end so it will exit. If you want to exit the whole loop after the first question just add another break statement between the questions. – Jortega Dec 3 at 1:38
  • where between the questions? – dezastrologu Dec 3 at 1:41
  • If you use break to exit the loop on a "yes" then you can keep moving to the next question. Then set the "q_one" to false on an answer of "no" and key off that between questions to beak out of the first while loop. Answer updated. I thought you wanted all questions to either have yes or no answers. – Jortega Dec 3 at 1:48
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You will not be able to do that without repeating the same else statement on all cases on your current structure.

You can however use a function for your input that will evaluate it repeatedly.

for instance:

def yes_or_no_question(question):
    answer = input(question).upper()
    if answer in ["YES", "NO"]:
        print(answer)
        return answer == "YES"
    print("Only YES or NO")
    return yes_or_no_question(question)

while True:
    if not yes_or_no_question('question_text'):
        break

    if not yes_or_no_question('question2_text'):
        break

    print("Yes to all, starting again!")

EDIT

You can nest and combine as much as you want.


while True:
    if yes_or_no_question('question_text'):
        print("Something for question 1 in case of yes")
        # you can add any logic here, including another question

    else:
        # you can add any logic here, including another question
        print("No for question 1")
        if yes_or_no_question('Question for NO on first question'):
            print("Yes for nested on Q1 No")
        else:
            print("No for nested on Q1 no")
        break

    if not yes_or_no_question('question2_text'):
        break

    print("Yes to all, starting again!")
  • what if I don't want it to return anything? I just want to print out questions and take in input – dezastrologu Dec 3 at 1:11
  • just remove the print() statements that you don't want – luigibertaco Dec 3 at 1:13
  • and if I want to print something based on the answer to each question? that's why I opted for the nested variant.. it makes a lot of sense to me and is easy to understand/work with imo even though it's a bit.. crude :) – dezastrologu Dec 3 at 1:21
  • this is great. so the function goes on if return answer == "YES" ? I'm trying to figure out this line – dezastrologu Dec 3 at 11:36

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