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This question already has an answer here:

var items = Array(523,3452,334,31,...5346);

How do I get random item from items?

marked as duplicate by royhowie, Denys Séguret javascript May 22 '15 at 8:42

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13 Answers 13

1569
var item = items[Math.floor(Math.random()*items.length)];
  • 114
    Math.random() will never be 1, nor should it. The largest index should always be one less than the length, or else you'll get an undefined error. – Kelly Sep 16 '13 at 16:06
  • 15
    Elegant solution. I tested it: var items = ["a","e","i","o","u"] var objResults = {} for(var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++){ var randomElement = items[Math.floor(Math.random()*items.length)] if (objResults[randomElement]){ objResults[randomElement]++ }else{ objResults[randomElement] = 1 } } console.log(objResults) The results are pretty randomized after 1000000 iterations: Object {u: 200222, o: 199543, a: 199936, e: 200183, i: 200116} – Johann Echavarria May 1 '14 at 22:17
  • 2
    @AnkitPatial: That's a way to "scramble" an array, but the question is about getting a randomly selected element from an array. There's a big difference. – damd Mar 4 '16 at 15:04
  • 2
    What happens here when array is empty? – tomazahlin Oct 21 '16 at 16:02
  • 9
    @virus Math.round is not a valid substitution for Math.floor. Using round would cause accidentally referencing an undefined index, say in the case Math.random() is 0.95 and items.length is 5. Math.round(0.95*5) is 5, which would be an invalid index. floor(random) will always be zero in your example. – Kelly Dec 20 '16 at 14:43
91

If you really must use jQuery to solve this problem:

(function($) {
    $.rand = function(arg) {
        if ($.isArray(arg)) {
            return arg[$.rand(arg.length)];
        } else if (typeof arg === "number") {
            return Math.floor(Math.random() * arg);
        } else {
            return 4;  // chosen by fair dice roll
        }
    };
})(jQuery);

var items = [523, 3452, 334, 31, ..., 5346];
var item = jQuery.rand(items);

This plugin will return a random element if given an array, or a value from [0 .. n) given a number, or given anything else, a guaranteed random value!

For extra fun, the array return is generated by calling the function recursively based on the array's length :)

Working demo at http://jsfiddle.net/2eyQX/

  • 1
    @neoascetic the point of that line is that picking an element from an array is not a jQuery problem, it's generic JS. – Alnitak Feb 10 '14 at 13:51
  • 72
    +1 for the fair dice roll! For those poor souls who don't get the joke. – The Guy with The Hat Aug 19 '14 at 13:16
  • @damd re: your proposed edit - it was clearly incorrect, since there's a clear split between defining the plugin in the IIFE, and using the plugin. However for consistency I have replaced the $ in the usage line with jQuery. – Alnitak Mar 4 '16 at 15:54
  • 3
    Definitely. There are less than an average of 3 chained methods per line, and the $ is not being used at least once per each line, therefore it does not have enough jQuery. – programmer5000 Feb 22 '17 at 14:47
  • This is not a problem that requires jQuery. – robertmain Feb 1 at 14:57
84

Use underscore (or loDash :)):

var randomArray = [
   '#cc0000','#00cc00', '#0000cc'
];

// use _.sample
var randomElement = _.sample(randomArray);

// manually use _.random
var randomElement = randomArray[_.random(randomArray.length-1)];

Or to shuffle an entire array:

// use underscore's shuffle function
var firstRandomElement = _.shuffle(randomArray)[0];
  • 16
    Using underscore or lodash for just one function would be overkill, but if you're doing any complicated js functionality then it can save hours or even days. – chim Jan 7 '13 at 9:43
  • 20
    Nowadays underscore has also better choice for this _.sample([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]) – Mikael Lepistö Dec 3 '13 at 8:43
  • 4
    You will probably be using _ on any real project. It's not a bad thing. – superluminary Jul 14 '15 at 19:17
  • 3
    lodash is modularized on npm, so you can install just the sample function if you want: npmjs.com/package/lodash.sample – XåpplI'-I0llwlg'I - Dec 4 '15 at 11:32
  • 3
    My creed is to use as few libraries as possible for any project. With that being said, I always end up using lodash. It's too convenient to not use – Phil Andrews Dec 9 '16 at 20:21
36
var random = items[Math.floor(Math.random()*items.length)]
33

1. solution: define Array prototype

Array.prototype.random = function () {
  return this[Math.floor((Math.random()*this.length))];
}

that will work on inline arrays

[2,3,5].random()

and of course predefined arrays

list = [2,3,5]
list.random()

2. solution: define custom function that accepts list and returns element

get_random = function (list) {
  return list[Math.floor((Math.random()*list.length))];
} 

get_random([2,3,5])
  • 8
    Downvoted for adding something to Array.prototype. – Evan Carroll Jun 29 '17 at 23:26
  • 20
    @EvanCarroll better reference a useful link instead of downvoting for subjective notions such as coding style which does not make the answer invalid nor "unuseful" ! stackoverflow.com/questions/14034180/… – Simon Jul 14 '17 at 19:19
  • 4
    Upvoted because downvoting for adding something to Array.prototype is not useful to anyone without explanation. – Donbot Nov 4 '18 at 18:20
26

Here's yet another way:

function rand(items) {
    return items[~~(items.length * Math.random())];
}
  • 18
    What is that crazy ~~? Never seen that in JS before. – Sam Stern Nov 22 '14 at 22:20
  • 7
    @hatboysam: do a search - it essentially converts the operand to the closest integer. – Dan Dascalescu Dec 16 '14 at 11:10
  • 7
    Actually, it rounds it down, like Math.floor. – programmer5000 Feb 22 '17 at 14:36
  • 8
    Nice answer. You still can be shorter: items[items.length * Math.random() | 0] :) – aloisdg Mar 19 '18 at 17:19
  • 2
    "Actually, it rounds it down, like Math.floor" @programmer5000. It actually rounds towards 0, i.e. ~~(-1.5) evaluates to -1, not the -2 which Math.floor gives. – Eureka Jul 22 '18 at 16:08
14

jQuery is JavaScript! It's just a JavaScript framework. So to find a random item, just use plain old JavaScript, for example,

var randomItem = items[Math.floor(Math.random()*items.length)]
11
var rndval=items[Math.floor(Math.random()*items.length)];
8
var items = Array(523,3452,334,31,...5346);

function rand(min, max) {
  var offset = min;
  var range = (max - min) + 1;

  var randomNumber = Math.floor( Math.random() * range) + offset;
  return randomNumber;
}


randomNumber = rand(0, items.length - 1);

randomItem = items[randomNumber];

credit:

Javascript Function: Random Number Generator

  • 1
    FYI, this could be one lined: Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min + 1)) + min – Solomon Ucko Apr 2 '17 at 20:11
7
// 1. Random shuffle items
items.sort(function() {return 0.5 - Math.random()})

// 2. Get first item
var item = items[0]

Shorter:

var item = items.sort(function() {return 0.5 - Math.random()})[0];
4

If you are using node.js, you can use unique-random-array. It simply picks something random from an array.

2
const ArrayRandomModule = {
  // get random item from array
  random: function (array) {
    return array[Math.random() * array.length | 0];
  },

  // [mutate]: extract from given array a random item
  pick: function (array, i) {
    return array.splice(i >= 0 ? i : Math.random() * array.length | 0, 1)[0];
  },

  // [mutate]: shuffle the given array
  shuffle: function (array) {
    for (var i = array.length; i > 0; --i)
      array.push(array.splice(Math.random() * i | 0, 1)[0]);
    return array;
  }
}
1

An alternate way would be to add a method to the Array prototype:

 Array.prototype.random = function (length) {
       return this[Math.floor((Math.random()*length))];
 }

 var teams = ['patriots', 'colts', 'jets', 'texans', 'ravens', 'broncos']
 var chosen_team = teams.random(teams.length)
 alert(chosen_team)
  • 4
    arrays have a built-in length property - why pass it as a parameter?! – Alnitak Dec 24 '12 at 18:22
  • 1
    i guess my point is that you can pass in any length you want not just the length of the array - if you just wanted to randomize the first two entries you could put length as 2 without changing the method. I don't think there is a performance issue with passing the length property as a parameter but i may be wrong – James Daly Dec 24 '12 at 19:15
  • 2
    It is generally not a good idea to extend host objects like this. You risk tripping over a future implementation of Array.random by the client that behaves differently than yours, breaking future code. You could at least check to make sure it doesn't exist before adding it. – Chris Baker Aug 19 '14 at 18:36
  • 3
    How about some common sense from developers if ecmascript adds a random method to the array object within the next 10 years I'll give you a $100,000. It won't happen; Stop sounding like a stinky professor! Extending built in objects is just a preference and when done properly especially in a small project it's fine. – James Daly Aug 20 '14 at 2:03

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