1

Sample json file payload.json.tpl:

{
  "foo": "bar",
  "x": {
    "y": "${array}"
  }
}

I have an array in bash

array=("one" "two" "three")

How can I run the jq command to replace the key .x.y to ["one", "two", "three"]

So the final json will be:

{
  "foo": "bar",
  "x": {
    "y": ["one", "two", "three"]
  }
}
2

Using $ARGS.positional (requires jq 1.6)

$ array=("one" "two" "three")
$ jq '.x.y = $ARGS.positional' payload.json.tpl --args "${array[@]}"
{
  "foo": "bar",
  "x": {
    "y": [
      "one",
      "two",
      "three"
    ]
  }
}
  • Interesting ... – hek2mgl 2 days ago
1

Like this, works with jq < 1.6 too:

< payload.json.tpl jq --arg a "${array[*]}" '.x.y=($a|split(" "))'

Note the use of ${array[*]} instead of ${array[@]}. When using *, the elements of ${array} will be passed as a single string instead of multiple strings.

https://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/html_node/Arrays.html

  • 1
    It has to be noted that this won't work for arrays whose elements themselves contain spaces, which is the primary reason to use a shell array over a space-separated string in the first place. (Though you may be able to construct a string using a delimiter that doesn't appear in any element.) – chepner 2 days ago
  • 1
    No delimiter was used to declare the array; that's the point. It's the conversion of the array to a single string that gets bound to a that can pose a problem. (I still think this answer is useful if one is stuck with an older version of jq, but the drawbacks still have to be acknowledged.) – chepner 2 days ago
  • 1
    yeah, I realized that after posting my comment. Thanks for the feedback here!! – hek2mgl 2 days ago

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