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Can someone help me with this problem in R. am having a vector with 2434 numeric value and each time I have to compute the quantile using the first 250 value, then move one step and do the same thing. Example

c(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10)

let's say n=3
The first step I need the quantile of 1,2,3
The second step I need the quantile of 2,3,4
The third step I need the quantile of 3,4,5

and so on. Thanks

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  • What do you mean by 'the quantile of 1,2,3' ? Just applying the quantile() function? – thelatemail Dec 3 at 23:56
  • 1
    yes apply the quantile function on my vector of n length – edosa odigie Dec 3 at 23:58
3

You can use rollapply from zoo with window size of 3 and apply quantile to each window.

zoo::rollapply(x, 3, quantile)

#     0% 25% 50% 75% 100%
#[1,]  1 1.5   2 2.5    3
#[2,]  2 2.5   3 3.5    4
#[3,]  3 3.5   4 4.5    5
#[4,]  4 4.5   5 5.5    6
#[5,]  5 5.5   6 6.5    7
#[6,]  6 6.5   7 7.5    8
#[7,]  7 7.5   8 8.5    9
#[8,]  8 8.5   9 9.5   10

Here, every row represents the quantile values for that window. Change the window size to 250 for your case.

data

x <- 1:10
  • am very sorry Ronak Shah but I didn't formulate the question in the right way. I have edit it – edosa odigie Dec 3 at 23:51
  • 2
    Use rollapply instead of rollmean and specify quantile as function: rollapply(x, 3, quantile) – Edo Dec 3 at 23:57
  • @edosaodigie Updated the answer. – Ronak Shah Dec 4 at 0:03
  • @Ronak Shah not working – edosa odigie Dec 4 at 0:20
  • @edosaodigie Unfortunately, this isn't enough information to help you. When you say not working what do you mean by that? Do you have an error (What is it?) Do you get incorrect output? (What is your expected output then? ) Do you need something completely different ? As you can see it gives an output for the sample x shown. Do you need similar output or you need something else ? – Ronak Shah Dec 4 at 0:30
1

Ronak's solution works perfectly, but here's an alternative in case you don't want to use the zoo package. First, I create the dummy data:

# Create test vector
v <- 1:10

Next, I create the function that will do all the work.

# Function for estimating quantiles
foo <- function(v, n){
  do.call(rbind, lapply(1:(length(v)-n+1), function(x)quantile(v[x:(x+n-1)])))
}

Applying this to the test data with n=3 gives the following.

#Apply function
foo(v, 3)
#>      0% 25% 50% 75% 100%
#> [1,]  1 1.5   2 2.5    3
#> [2,]  2 2.5   3 3.5    4
#> [3,]  3 3.5   4 4.5    5
#> [4,]  4 4.5   5 5.5    6
#> [5,]  5 5.5   6 6.5    7
#> [6,]  6 6.5   7 7.5    8
#> [7,]  7 7.5   8 8.5    9
#> [8,]  8 8.5   9 9.5   10

Created on 2019-12-03 by the reprex package (v0.2.1.9000)

So, what does the function do? It has a vector of start points for each "window" of the calculation: 1:(length(v)-n+1). Note that it isn't 1:length(v) because a window starting at, say, length(v) would overshoot the end of the vector. It runs through this vector using lapply and calls quantile for the vector starting at element x and with size n. The do.call(rbind,...) packages it all up into a data frame.

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