7

I'm trying to find groups of repeated digits in a number, e.g. 12334555611 becomes (1 2 33 4 555 6 11).

This works:

$n.comb(/ 0+ | 1+ | 2+ | 3+ | 4+ | 5+ | 6+ | 7+ | 8+ | 9+ /)

but is not very elegant.

Is there a better way to do this?

  • 1
    Just to check 11223311 should become (11 22 33 11) and not (1111 22 33)? – Scimon Proctor Dec 4 '19 at 9:02
  • @Scimon: correct. – mscha Dec 4 '19 at 9:03
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    @Elizabeth Mattijsen: I know Perl 6 has been renamed, but must you really erase all traces of the name? That prevents people from finding this question by searching on [perl6 repeated digits], for instance. – mscha Dec 4 '19 at 9:08
  • See meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/391656/… for evidence that this may be a bad idea, – mscha Dec 4 '19 at 9:37
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    @mscha: I propose that if the op mentions Perl 6 in the title, we change this to "Raku (née Perl 6)". – Elizabeth Mattijsen Dec 4 '19 at 16:57
8
'12334555611'.comb(/\d+ % <same>/)

Please check the answer of the first task of Perl Weekly Challenge

  • Nice one! I had already accepted Wiktor's answer, but this one is even more elegant! – mscha Dec 4 '19 at 11:11
5

You may use

$n.comb(/(.) $0*/)

The (.) creates a capturing group and captures any char into Group 1, then there is a backreference to Group 1 that is $0 in Perl6 regex. The * quantifier matches zero or more occurrences of the same char as in Group 1.

Replace the . with \d to match any digit if you need to only match repeated digits.

See a Perl6 demo online.

  • Thanks. The elegance of this is debatable 😉 but it is a better solution than my original one. – mscha Dec 4 '19 at 9:10
  • Beats my attempt ( $n ~~ m/@<groups>=((<[0..9]>)$0+)*/ ).<groups>.map( *.Str ) – Scimon Proctor Dec 4 '19 at 9:16
  • @Wiktor, it's the {} that makes me find the elegance debatable. But to my surprise, it doesn't seem to be necessary, $n.comb(/(.) $0*/) works as well (at least on my Rakudo Star 2019.03.1). – mscha Dec 4 '19 at 9:27
  • @mscha OK, when I first tried it, it did not work. Good, let me change the link and the code. – Wiktor Stribiżew Dec 4 '19 at 10:05
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    @mscha "to my surprise, it [{}] doesn't seem to be necessary" My discussion of related issues in the first couple sections of "Publication" of match variables by Rakudo may help clear up why. (Perhaps in the sense that some folk use mud to try clear up acne, but I thought I'd comment anyway.) – raiph Dec 4 '19 at 13:12

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