318

I would like to concatenate a number of text files into one large file in terminal. I know I can do this using the cat command. However, I would like the filename of each file to precede the "data dump" for that file. Anyone know how to do this?

what I currently have:

file1.txt = bluemoongoodbeer

file2.txt = awesomepossum

file3.txt = hownowbrowncow

cat file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt

desired output:

file1

bluemoongoodbeer

file2

awesomepossum

file3

hownowbrowncow

19 Answers 19

462

Was looking for the same thing, and found this to suggest:

tail -n +1 file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt

Output:

==> file1.txt <==
<contents of file1.txt>

==> file2.txt <==
<contents of file2.txt>

==> file3.txt <==
<contents of file3.txt>

If there is only a single file then the header will not be printed. If using GNU utils, you can use -v to always print a header.

  • 2
    This works with the GNU tail (part of GNU Coreutils) as well. – ArjunShankar Apr 10 '12 at 16:35
  • 4
    Awesome -n +1 option! An alternative: head -n-0 file1 file2 file3. – Frozen Flame Dec 20 '15 at 3:22
  • 1
    Works great with both BSD tail and GNU tail on MacOS X. You can leave out the space between -n and +1, as in -n+1. – vdm Nov 22 '17 at 10:26
  • 3
    tail -n +1 * was exactly was I was looking for, thanks! – kR105 Jun 20 '18 at 16:39
  • 1
    works on MacOsX 10.14.4 sudo ulimit -n 1024; find -f . -name "*.rb" | xargs tail -n+1 > ./source_ruby.txt – kolas Apr 9 at 12:38
171

I used grep for something similar:

grep "" *.txt

It does not give you a 'header', but prefixes every line with the filename.

  • 1
    Thanks this worked best for me! – Jack Jan 10 '13 at 10:15
  • 7
    Output breaks if *.txt expands to only one file. In this regard, I'd advise grep '' /dev/null *.txt – antak Jul 10 '14 at 3:39
  • 1
    +1 for showing me a new use for grep. this met my needs perfectly. in my case, each file only contained one line, so it gave me a neatly formatted output that was easily parsable – verboze Mar 31 '15 at 21:03
  • 9
    grep will only print file headers if there is more than one file. If you want to make sure to print the file path always, use -H. If you don't want the headers use -h. Also note it will print (standard input) for STDIN. – Jorge Bucaran Sep 30 '15 at 22:31
  • 1
    You can also use ag (the silver searcher): by default, ag . *.txt prefixes each file with its name, and each line with its number. – anol Jul 25 '16 at 11:32
96

This should do the trick as well:

find . -type f -print -exec cat {} \;

Means:

find    = linux `find` command finds filenames, see `man find` for more info
.       = in current directory
-type f = only files, not directories
-print  = show found file
-exec   = additionally execute another linux command
cat     = linux `cat` command, see `man cat`, displays file contents
{}      = placeholder for the currently found filename
\;      = tell `find` command that it ends now here

You further can combine searches trough boolean operators like -and or -or. find -ls is nice, too.

  • 1
    Could you explain more what this command does? Is exactly what I Needed – AAlvz Feb 9 '14 at 2:57
  • 4
    This is linux' standard find command. It searches all files in the current directory, prints their name, then for each one, cats the file. Omitting the -print won't print the filename before the cat. – Maxim_united Apr 17 '14 at 9:45
  • 16
    You can also use -printf to customize the output. For example: find *.conf -type f -printf '\n==> %p <==\n' -exec cat {} \; to match the output of tail -n +1 * – Maxim_united Apr 17 '14 at 9:55
  • 1
    -printf doesn't work on mac, unless you want to brew install findutils and then use gfind instead of find. – Matt Fletcher Jan 13 '16 at 11:25
  • 1
    If you want colors you can use that fact that find allows multiple -execs: find -name '*.conf' -exec printf '\n\e[33;1m%s\e[0m\n' {} \; -exec cat {} \; – banbh Mar 20 at 17:24
22

This should do the trick:

for filename in file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt; do
    echo "$filename"
    cat "$filename"
done > output.txt

or to do this for all text files recursively:

find . -type f -name '*.txt' -print | while read filename; do
    echo "$filename"
    cat "$filename"
done > output.txt
  • 1
    didn't work. I just wrote some really ugly awk code: for i in $listoffiles do awk '{print FILENAME,$0,$1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7,$8,$9,$10,$11}' $i >> concat.txt done – Nick May 6 '11 at 22:13
  • 2
    ...care to elaborate? That's about as simple as bash code gets. – Chris Eberle May 6 '11 at 22:14
  • @Nick: your awk line shouldn't even work, considering that $0 is the entire line, so you've actually got repeating columns in there... – Chris Eberle May 6 '11 at 22:20
  • 1
    @Chris You're so totally right. – Nick May 6 '11 at 22:26
  • @Nick: Nifty solution otherwise :) – Chris Eberle May 6 '11 at 22:27
15
find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 -I % sh -c 'echo %; cat %'

This will print the full filename (including path), then the contents of the file. It is also very flexible, as you can use -name "expr" for the find command, and run as many commands as you like on the files.

  • 1
    It is also quite straightforward to combine with grep. To use with bash: find . -type f -print | grep PATTERN | xargs -n 1 -I {} -i bash -c 'echo ==== {} ====; cat {}; echo' – dojuba May 26 '15 at 11:06
15

I had a series of files that ended in stats.txt that I wanted to concatenate with the filenames.

I did the following and when there is more than one file, the "more" command includes the filename as a header.

more *stats.txt > stats.txt

or for a general case

more FILES_TO_CONCAT > OUTPUT_FILE
  • 4
    more <FILES> | cat – Acumenus Aug 22 '14 at 20:06
5

I like this option

for x in $(ls ./*.php); do echo $x; cat $x | grep -i 'menuItem'; done

Output looks like this:

./debug-things.php
./Facebook.Pixel.Code.php
./footer.trusted.seller.items.php
./GoogleAnalytics.php
./JivositeCode.php
./Live-Messenger.php
./mPopex.php
./NOTIFICATIONS-box.php
./reviewPopUp_Frame.php
            $('#top-nav-scroller-pos-<?=$active**MenuItem**;?>').addClass('active');
            gotTo**MenuItem**();
./Reviews-Frames-PopUps.php
./social.media.login.btns.php
./social-side-bar.php
./staticWalletsAlerst.php
./tmp-fix.php
./top-nav-scroller.php
$active**MenuItem** = '0';
        $active**MenuItem** = '1';
        $active**MenuItem** = '2';
        $active**MenuItem** = '3';
./Waiting-Overlay.php
./Yandex.Metrika.php
4

This is how I normally handle formatting like that:

for i in *; do echo "$i"; echo ; cat "$i"; echo ; done ;

I generally pipe the cat into a grep for specific information.

  • 2
    Be careful here. for i in * won't include subdirectories. – Acumenus Jan 27 '14 at 23:48
3

you can use this simple command instead of using a for loop,

ls -ltr | awk '{print $9}' | xargs head
3

If you like colors, try this:

for i in *; do echo; echo $'\e[33;1m'$i$'\e[0m'; cat $i; done | less -R

or:

tail -n +1 * | grep -e $ -e '==.*'

or: (with package 'multitail' installed)

multitail *
  • 1
    For the sake of colors highlighting the filename: find . -type f -name "*.txt" | xargs -I {} bash -c "echo $'\e[33;1m'{}$'\e[0m';cat {}" – MediaVince Jan 5 '17 at 10:22
2

Here is a really simple way. You said you want to cat, which implies you want to view the entire file. But you also need the filename printed.

Try this

head -n99999999 * or head -n99999999 file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt

Hope that helps

  • 4
    a cleaner syntax would be head -n -0 file.txt file2.txt file3.txt. Works for head in GNU coreutils – doubleDown Oct 20 '12 at 6:09
1

This method will print filename and then file contents:

tail -f file1.txt file2.txt

Output:

==> file1.txt <==
contents of file1.txt ...
contents of file1.txt ...

==> file2.txt <==
contents of file2.txt ...
contents of file2.txt ...
  • 2
    The -f is useful if you want to track a file which is being written to, but not really within the scope of what the OP asked. – tripleee Sep 4 '15 at 9:05
1

If you want to replace those ugly ==> <== with something else

tail -n +1 *.txt | sed -e 's/==>/\n###/g' -e 's/<==/###/g' >> "files.txt"

explanation:

tail -n +1 *.txt - output all files in folder with header

sed -e 's/==>/\n###/g' -e 's/<==/###/g' - replace ==> with new line + ### and <== with just ###

>> "files.txt" - output all to a file

0
find . -type f -exec cat {} \; -print
0

If you want the result in the same format as your desired output you can try:

for file in `ls file{1..3}.txt`; \
do echo $file | cut -d '.' -f 1; \ 
cat $file  ; done;

Result:

file1
bluemoongoodbeer
file2
awesomepossum
file3
hownowbrowncow

You can put echo -e before and after the cut so you have the spacing between the lines as well:

$ for file in `ls file{1..3}.txt`; do echo $file | cut -d '.' -f 1; echo -e; cat $file; echo -e  ; done;

Result:

file1

bluemoongoodbeer

file2

awesomepossum

file3

hownowbrowncow
  • Explanation: for loop goes through the list the ls command resulted. $ ls file{1..3}.txt Result: file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt each iteration will echo the $file string then it's piped into a cut command where I used . as a field separator which breaks fileX.txt into two pieces and prints out the field1 (field2 is the txt) The rest should be clear – Fekete Sumér Feb 1 '16 at 13:01
0
  • AIX 7.1 ksh

... glomming onto those who've already mentioned head works for some of us:

$ r head
head file*.txt
==> file1.txt <==
xxx
111

==> file2.txt <==
yyy
222
nyuk nyuk nyuk

==> file3.txt <==
zzz
$

My need is to read the first line; as noted, if you want more than 10 lines, you'll have to add options (head -9999, etc).

Sorry for posting a derivative comment; I don't have sufficient street cred to comment/add to someone's comment.

0

For solving this tasks I usually use the following command:

$ cat file{1..3}.txt >> result.txt

It's a very convenient way to concatenate files if the number of files is quite large.

0

If the files all have the same name or can be matched by find, you can do (e.g.):

find . -name create.sh | xargs tail -n +1

to find, show the path of and cat each file.

0

And the missing awk solution is:

$ awk '(FNR==1){print ">> " FILENAME " <<"}1' *

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