5

I have method which takes two parameters one as string and other as int.

The string has to compare with more than 50 string and Once the match is found int value need to be mapped with hard coded string as Example below

EX:

  string Compare_Method(std::string str, int val) {

     if(str == "FIRST")
{
  std::array<std::string, 3> real_value = {"Hello1","hai1","bye1"}
  return real_value[val];
}

     else if(str == "SECOND")
{
  std::array<std::string, 4> real_value = {"Hello2","hai2","bye2"}
  return real_value[val];
}

     else if(str == "THIRD")
{
  std::array<std::string, 5> real_value = {"Hello3","hai3","bye3"}
  return real_value[val];
}

//----- 50+ else if

}

My approach is as above. What will be the efficient way

1.To compare more than 50 string.

2. create std::array for each if case

EDITED : std::array size is not fixed it can be 3,4,5 as edited above.

4
  • 9
    Store your strings and string arrays in an unordered_map. This will be much more efficient. You can also form a composite key made of the string and the value and use that key to index the map. – Yves Daoust Dec 4 '19 at 14:02
  • 1
    Are the strings showed in the snippet just an example or the actual expected values? – Bob__ Dec 11 '19 at 9:39
  • 1
    @rim in all your else if's you also make the array of real_value bigger but you don't add more strings to the array. Just in case you weren't aware of it :) – Florian Humblot Dec 17 '19 at 14:44
  • Just an idea: Maybe it is possible to think of an approach using SMID. Not sure how this would actually look like with C++ though and for string operations it might also look quite ugly. – Sjoerd222888 Dec 18 '19 at 9:10
9
+50

This would be my way of doing that. The data structure is created only once and the access times should be fast enough

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <array>
#include <unordered_map>

std::string Compare_Method(const std::string& str, int val)
{
    //                                  or std::vector<std::string>
    static std::unordered_map<std::string, std::array<std::string, 3>> map
    {
        {  "FIRST", { "Hello1", "hail1", "bye1" }},
        { "SECOND", { "Hello2", "hail2", "bye2" }},
        {  "THIRD", { "Hello3", "hail3", "bye3" }},
        // 50+ more
    };

    // maybe check if str is present in the map

    return map[str][val];
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << Compare_Method("SECOND", 1) << std::endl;
}

If std::unordered_map isn't (fast) enough for you, you can come up with some sort of static optimal hash structure, since keys are known at compile time.

9
  • 1
    you can also make a custom hashing function for std::unordered_map to make it faster, since the keys are known – phuclv Dec 15 '19 at 11:36
  • 1
    Using the at() or operator [] on unordered_map is risky game as if passed first parameter to the function is not present in unordered_map then you have to face the out_of_bound exception. Better use the find(). – Build Succeeded Dec 17 '19 at 18:16
  • 1
    @Romen I took these into account. Just note the comments in my code. – Zereges Dec 17 '19 at 19:33
  • @Mannoj Yeah, that's why the comment maybe check if str is present in the map is there. If the OP will make sure not to call Compare_Method with invalid argument, find is not necessary. – Zereges Dec 17 '19 at 19:34
  • My personal preference would be to use find anyway, to avoid having the code used by operator[] to insert the key and a default value when calling map[str] and possible performance hit creating a default value to insert should str not be found. – 1201ProgramAlarm Dec 17 '19 at 23:17
2

If those 50 strings are something you will be widely using throughout your program, string comparisons will take a toll on performance. I'd suggest you to adapt them to an enum.

enum Strings
{
    FIRST,
    SECOND,
    THIRD,
    …
    …
}

You'll obviously need a method to convert string to int whenever you get one from the source (user input, file read, etc.). This should be as infrequent as possible since your system now works on enum values (which can be used as indices on STL containers as we see in the next step)

int GetEnumIndex(const std::string& str)
{
    // here you can map all variants of the same string to the same number
    if ("FIRST" == str || "first" == str) return 1;
    …
}

Then, the comparison method can be based on the enum instead of the string:

std::string Compare_Method(const int& strIndex, int val)
{
    static std::vector<std::vector<std::string>> stringArray
    {
        { "Hello1", "hail1", "bye1" },
        { "Hello2", "hail2", "bye2", "aloha2" },
        { "Hello3", "hail3", "bye3", "aloha3", "tata3" },
        …
    };
    return stringArray[strIndex][val];
}
2
  • 1
    You'll obviously need a method to convert string to int, so your GetEnumIndex will perform a lots of comparsions as well. – Zereges Dec 14 '19 at 14:45
  • You siad "string comparisons will take a toll on performance" but still GetEnumIndex do the string comparing ? – rim Dec 16 '19 at 6:59
2

With information provided by you, I tried various variations to find out best way to achieve objective. I am listing best one here. You can see other methods here.

You can compile it and run run.sh to compare performance of all cases.

std::string Method6(const std::string &str, int val) {
  static std::array<std::string, 5> NUMBERS{"FIRST", "SECOND", "THIRD",
                                            "FOURTH", "FIFTH"};
  static std::array<std::vector<std::string>, 5> VALUES{
      std::vector<std::string>{"FIRST", "hai1", "bye1"},
      std::vector<std::string>{"Hello1", "SECOND", "bye1"},
      std::vector<std::string>{"Hello1", "hai1", "THIRD"},
      std::vector<std::string>{"FOURTH", "hai1", "bye1"},
      std::vector<std::string>{"Hello1", "FIFTH", "bye1"}};
  for (int i = 0; i < NUMBERS.size(); ++i) {
    if (NUMBERS[i] == str) {
      return VALUES[i][val];
    }
  }
  return "";
}

For simplicity I have been using NUMBERS with length of 5 but you can use what ever length you want to.

VALUES is std::array of std::vector so you can add any number if element to std::vector.

output from github code.

Method1   880
Method2   851
Method3   7292
Method4   989
Method5   598
Method6   440

You output may be different based on you system and system load at the time of execution.

9
  • 1
    link is invalid – rim Dec 17 '19 at 9:54
  • @rim check now. – Manthan Tilva Dec 17 '19 at 10:07
  • 1
    accepting this since i found more info and best approach – rim Dec 17 '19 at 12:31
  • None of your other methods used std::unordered_map which can be measurably faster than std::map for lookups. I would test that variant of the map structure and include it for completeness of the answer. (It might even be faster than the method you chose for the answer?) – Romen Dec 17 '19 at 16:27
  • 1
    Your testing methodology seems biased as well, Method6 only has to perform up to 5 string comparisons since you chose such a small size for NUMBERS. The original question stated that NUMBERS would actually be at least 50 elements long, which would cause the more efficient lookup structures like std::map and std::unordered_map to demonstrate their performance better. I made my own tests and found std::unordered_map to be 10 - 10000 times faster than linearly searching a std::array (depending on how far down the key was in the array, also on MSVC instead of GCC). – Romen Dec 17 '19 at 18:02

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