38

I am building a carousel right now, in React. To scroll to the individual slides I am using document.querySelector like so :

useEffect(() => {
    document.querySelector(`#slide-${activeSlide}`).scrollIntoView({
      behavior: 'smooth',
      block: 'nearest',
      inline: 'nearest'
    });
  }, [activeSlide]);

Is this bad practice? After all, I am accessing the DOM directly here? What would be the React way of doing this?

edit: full return method

return (
    <>
      <button onClick={() => setActiveSlide(moveLeft)}>PREV</button>
      <Wrapper id="test">
        {children.map((child, i) => {
          return (
            <Slide id={`slide-${i}`} key={`slide-${i}`}>
              {child}
            </Slide>
          );
        })}
      </Wrapper>

      <button onClick={() => setActiveSlide(moveRight)}>NEXT</button>
    </>
  );
2
  • Is the element you're sliding into view rendered by your component? Dec 5, 2019 at 16:02
  • 1
    Yes. I'll edit my post to include the full return block Dec 5, 2019 at 16:05

2 Answers 2

46

I can't answer the "should you" part of whether to use refs for this instead other than if you do, you don't need those id values unless you use them for something else.

But here's how you would:

  1. Use useRef(null) to create the ref.

    const activeSlideRef = useRef(null);
    
  2. Put it on the Slide that's currently active

    <Slide ref={i === activeSlide ? activeSlideRef : null} ...>
    
  3. In your useEffect, use the ref's current property

    useEffect(() => {
        if (activeSlideRef.current) {
            activeSlideRef.current.scrollIntoView({
              behavior: 'smooth',
              block: 'nearest',
              inline: 'nearest'
            });
        }
    }, [activeSlide]);
    

    (I think activeSlide is a reasonable dependency for that effect. You can't use the ref, the ref itself doesn't vary...)

Live example, I've turned some of your components into divs for convenience:

const {useEffect, useRef, useState} = React;

function Deck({children}) {
    const [activeSlide, setActiveSlide] = useState(0);
    const activeSlideRef = useRef(null);

    useEffect(() => {
        if (activeSlideRef.current) {
            activeSlideRef.current.scrollIntoView({
              behavior: 'smooth',
              block: 'nearest',
              inline: 'nearest'
            });
        }
    }, [activeSlide]);

    const moveLeft = Math.max(0, activeSlide - 1);
    const moveRight = Math.min(children.length - 1, activeSlide + 1);

    return (
        <React.Fragment>
          <button onClick={() => setActiveSlide(moveLeft)}>PREV</button>
          <div id="test">
            {children.map((child, i) => {
              const active = i === activeSlide;
              return (
                <div className={`slide ${active ? "active" : ""}`} ref={active ? activeSlideRef : null} id={`slide-${i}`} key={`slide-${i}`}>
                  {child}
                </div>
              );
            })}
          </div>

          <button onClick={() => setActiveSlide(moveRight)}>NEXT</button>
        </React.Fragment>
    );
}

ReactDOM.render(
    <Deck>
      <div>slide 0 </div>
      <div>slide 1 </div>
      <div>slide 2 </div>
      <div>slide 3 </div>
      <div>slide 4 </div>
      <div>slide 5 </div>
      <div>slide 6 </div>
      <div>slide 7 </div>
      <div>slide 8 </div>
      <div>slide 9 </div>
    </Deck>,
    document.getElementById("root")
);
.slide {
  height: 4em;
  vertical-align: middle;
  text-align: center;
}
#test {
  overflow: scroll;
  max-height: 20em;
}
.active {
  font-weight: bold;
  color: blue;
}
<div id="root"></div>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.10.2/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.10.2/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>


In a comment you've asked:

Do you know whether it's possible to disable useEffect here for the first render?

To keep non-state per-component info around, interestingly you use useRef. The docs for useRef point out that it's not just for DOM element references, it's also for per-component non-state data. So you could have

const firstRenderRef = useRef(true);

then in your useEffect callback, check firstRenderRef.current &mndash; if it's true, set it false, otherwise do the scrolling:

const {useEffect, useRef, useState} = React;

function Deck({children}) {
    const [activeSlide, setActiveSlide] = useState(0);
    const activeSlideRef = useRef(null);
    // *** Use a ref with the initial value `true`
    const firstRenderRef = useRef(true);

    console.log("render");

    useEffect(() => {
        // *** After render, don't do anything, just remember we've seen the render
        if (firstRenderRef.current) {
            console.log("set false");
            firstRenderRef.current = false;
        } else if (activeSlideRef.current) {
            console.log("scroll");
            activeSlideRef.current.scrollIntoView({
              behavior: 'smooth',
              block: 'nearest',
              inline: 'nearest'
            });
        }
    }, [activeSlide]);

    const moveLeft = Math.max(0, activeSlide - 1);
    const moveRight = Math.min(children.length - 1, activeSlide + 1);

    return (
        <React.Fragment>
          <button onClick={() => setActiveSlide(moveLeft)}>PREV</button>
          <div id="test">
            {children.map((child, i) => {
              const active = i === activeSlide;
              return (
                <div className={`slide ${active ? "active" : ""}`} ref={active ? activeSlideRef : null} id={`slide-${i}`} key={`slide-${i}`}>
                  {child}
                </div>
              );
            })}
          </div>

          <button onClick={() => setActiveSlide(moveRight)}>NEXT</button>
        </React.Fragment>
    );
}

ReactDOM.render(
    <Deck>
      <div>slide 0 </div>
      <div>slide 1 </div>
      <div>slide 2 </div>
      <div>slide 3 </div>
      <div>slide 4 </div>
      <div>slide 5 </div>
      <div>slide 6 </div>
      <div>slide 7 </div>
      <div>slide 8 </div>
      <div>slide 9 </div>
    </Deck>,
    document.getElementById("root")
);
.slide {
  height: 4em;
  vertical-align: middle;
  text-align: center;
}
#test {
  overflow: scroll;
  max-height: 10em;
}
.active {
  font-weight: bold;
  color: blue;
}
<div id="root"></div>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.10.2/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.10.2/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>


As a thought experiment, I wrote a hook to make the ergonomics a bit easier:

function useInstance(instance = {}) {
    // assertion: instance && typeof instance === "object"
    const ref = useRef(instance);
    return ref.current;
}

Usage:

const inst = useInstance({first: true});

In useEffect, if inst.first is true, do inst.first = false;; otherwise, do the scrolling.

Live:

const {useEffect, useRef, useState} = React;

function useInstance(instance = {}) {
    // assertion: instance && typeof instance === "object"
    const ref = useRef(instance);
    return ref.current;
}

function Deck({children}) {
    const [activeSlide, setActiveSlide] = useState(0);
    const activeSlideRef = useRef(null);
    const inst = useInstance({first: true});

    console.log("render");

    useEffect(() => {
        // *** After render, don't do anything, just remember we've seen the render
        if (inst.first) {
            console.log("set false");
            inst.first = false;
        } else if (activeSlideRef.current) {
            console.log("scroll");
            activeSlideRef.current.scrollIntoView({
              behavior: 'smooth',
              block: 'nearest',
              inline: 'nearest'
            });
        }
    }, [activeSlide]);

    const moveLeft = Math.max(0, activeSlide - 1);
    const moveRight = Math.min(children.length - 1, activeSlide + 1);

    return (
        <React.Fragment>
          <button onClick={() => setActiveSlide(moveLeft)}>PREV</button>
          <div id="test">
            {children.map((child, i) => {
              const active = i === activeSlide;
              return (
                <div className={`slide ${active ? "active" : ""}`} ref={active ? activeSlideRef : null} id={`slide-${i}`} key={`slide-${i}`}>
                  {child}
                </div>
              );
            })}
          </div>

          <button onClick={() => setActiveSlide(moveRight)}>NEXT</button>
        </React.Fragment>
    );
}

ReactDOM.render(
    <Deck>
      <div>slide 0 </div>
      <div>slide 1 </div>
      <div>slide 2 </div>
      <div>slide 3 </div>
      <div>slide 4 </div>
      <div>slide 5 </div>
      <div>slide 6 </div>
      <div>slide 7 </div>
      <div>slide 8 </div>
      <div>slide 9 </div>
    </Deck>,
    document.getElementById("root")
);
.slide {
  height: 4em;
  vertical-align: middle;
  text-align: center;
}
#test {
  overflow: scroll;
  max-height: 10em;
}
.active {
  font-weight: bold;
  color: blue;
}
<div id="root"></div>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.10.2/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.10.2/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>

7
  • 1
    thank you very much, this works! Do you know whether it's possible to disable useEffect here for the first render? Dec 5, 2019 at 21:47
  • 1
    @R.Kohlisch - I've added to the end of the answer to show how to do that. Dec 6, 2019 at 9:52
  • 2
    this is so amazing, thank you so much. I wish I could upvote this answer more!! Dec 6, 2019 at 13:00
  • 5
    Refs are more reliable for getting the specific DOM node you care about. Using querySelector or something similar (getElementsByClass or getElementById) can give unexpected results if there are multiple elements that match the query, especially if there is one outside the element that matches it. If you're writing a component that will show up multiple times in many places, refs become more of a clear-cut winner. Apr 4, 2020 at 3:08
  • 1
    Step 2 in this answer (assigning a ref conditionally) is absolute genius. I've been fighting for days with a custom typeahead, where I only want to call some custom scrolling logic for keyboard events, because it screws up with mouse scrolling. So there was a need to have a ref to a child in a parent, and this solution works beautifully. Great stuff. May 17, 2021 at 20:31
15

Adding to the accepted answer and trying to answer the 'should' part of the question, wrt using refs for DOM manipulation:

  • refs make it easier to uniquely identify + select in linear time the corresponding element (as compared to id which multiple elements can, by mistake, have the same value for + compared to document.querySelector which needs to scan the DOM to select the correct element)
  • refs are aware of react component lifecycle, so react would make sure that refs are updated to null when component unmounts and more out of the box convenience.
  • refs as a concept + syntax are platform agnostic, so you can use the same understanding in react native and the browser, while query selector is a browser thing
  • for SSR, where there is no DOM, refs can still be used to target react elements

ofcourse, using query selector is not incorrect and it wouldn't break your functionality if you use it in the react world generally, but it is better to use something provided by the framework as it comes with some default benefits in most cases.

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