16

I have a code like

template <size_t N>
class A
{
    template <size_t N>
    someFunctions() {};
};

Now I want to create instances of the class and call the functions in it in a for loop for a set of many values like

// in main()

int main()
{
    for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++)
    {
        const int N = i;  // dont know how to do this
        A<N> a;
        a.functionCalls();
    }
}

How to do this? Hoping for a method to do this.

  • To be used as a template parameter N needs to be constexpr which if it is a loop variable that's not the case – CoryKramer Dec 5 '19 at 17:56
  • You can't, does A really need to be a template? – Alan Birtles Dec 5 '19 at 17:58
  • Yeah there is a need for the class A to be template for some reasons and it is a model of something so it has to be a template class – nachiappan venkatesh Dec 5 '19 at 18:00
11

This would require something called a template for which is the expected form expansion statements will take, which is something that look like a for loop but in reality is a templated block in a function that is instanciated multiple times.

Of course, there is a workaround. We can abuse generic lambdas to declare some sort of local templated block and instanciate it ourself:

template <typename T, T... S, typename F>
constexpr void for_sequence(std::integer_sequence<T, S...>, F f) {
    (static_cast<void>(f(std::integral_constant<T, S>{})), ...);
}

This function takes an integer sequence and instantiate the lambda F as many time as the length of the sequence.

It is used like this:

for_sequence(std::make_index_sequence<100>(), [](auto N) { /* N is from 0 to 99 */
  A<N + 1> a; /* N + 1 is from 1 to 100 */
  a.functionCalls();
});

Here, N can be sent as template parameter because it's an object that has a constexpr conversion operator to an integer type. More precisely, it's a std::integral_constant with an increasing value.

Live example

  • 3
    Ugh. When I see template fun like this, I just know I am going to have to debug it later without a callstack and have to guess what is going on... :) – Michael Dorgan Dec 5 '19 at 18:15
  • What is the purpose of static_cast<void> ? – Ayxan Dec 5 '19 at 18:28
  • 2
    @Ayxan avoid problems when the lambda f returns a type that overloads the comma operator – Guillaume Racicot Dec 5 '19 at 18:34
  • @MichaelDorgan This is why we need template for. Abusing language constructs like this is always more painful – Guillaume Racicot Dec 5 '19 at 18:35
  • @GuillaumeRacicot or we need better abstractions than templates for meta programming. – Ajay Brahmakshatriya Dec 6 '19 at 2:39
5

The N needs to be compile-time constant, which is with a normal for loop is not possible.

But, there are many workarounds. For instance, inspired by this SO post, you can do something like the following. (See a Live demo)

template<size_t N>
class A
{
public:
    // make the member function public so that you can call with its instance
    void someFunctions()
    {
        std::cout << N << "\n";
    };
};

template<int N> struct AGenerator
{
    static void generate()
    {
        AGenerator<N - 1>::generate();
        A<N> a;
        a.someFunctions();
    }
};

template<> struct AGenerator<1>
{
    static void generate()
    {
        A<1> a;
        a.someFunctions();
    }
};

int main()
{
    // call the static member for constructing 100 A objects
    AGenerator<100>::generate();
}

Prints 1 to 100


In , the above can be reduced to a single template AGenerator class(i.e. specialization can be avoided), using if constexpr. (See a Live demo)

template<std::size_t N>
struct AGenerator final
{
    static constexpr void generate() noexcept
    {
        if constexpr (N == 1)
        {
            A<N> a;
            a.someFunctions();
            // .. do something more with `a`
        }
        else
        {
            AGenerator<N - 1>::generate();
            A<N> a;
            a.someFunctions();
            // .. do something more with `a`
        }
    }
};

Output:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

In case of providing the range of iteration, you could use the following.(See a Live demo)

template<std::size_t MAX, std::size_t MIN = 1> // `MIN` is set to 1 by default
struct AGenerator final
{
    static constexpr void generate() noexcept
    {
        if constexpr (MIN == 1)
        {
            A<MIN> a;
            a.someFunctions();
            // .. do something more with `a`
            AGenerator<MAX, MIN + 1>::generate();
        }
        else if constexpr (MIN != 1 && MIN <= MAX)
        {
            A<MIN> a;
            a.someFunctions();
            // .. do something more with `a`
            AGenerator<MAX, MIN + 1>::generate();
        }
    }
};

int main()
{
    // provide the `MAX` count of looping. `MIN` is set to 1 by default
    AGenerator<10>::generate();
}

Outputs the same as the above version.

4

From C++20, you can use template lambdas, so you can try something as follows

[]<int ... Is>(std::integer_sequence<int, Is...>)
 { (A<Is+1>{}.functionCall(), ...); }
   (std::make_integer_sequence<int, 100>{});

The following is a full compiling example that print all numbers from 0 to 99

#include <utility>
#include <iostream>

int main()
 {
  []<int ... Is>(std::integer_sequence<int, Is...>)
   { (std::cout << Is << std::endl, ...); }
     (std::make_integer_sequence<int, 100>{});
 }
1

One way you can do this is with template meta-programming with something like this:

#include <iostream>

template <std::size_t N>
struct A {
  void foo() { std::cout << N << '\n'; }
};

template <std::size_t from, std::size_t to>
struct call_foo {
  void operator()() {
    if constexpr (from != to) {
      A<from + 1>{}.foo();
      call_foo<from + 1, to>{}();
    }
  }
};

int main() { call_foo<0, 100>{}(); }
0

Just fo completeness - is it really required for the class or function be templated, if the only usage of function is to be called from loop?

If so and you don't want to write by hand take look at boost.hana.

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