37

why the following code is giving error?

class Foo:
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        print("Creating Instance")
        instance = super(Foo, cls).__new__(cls,*args, **kwargs)
        return instance

    def __init__(self, a, b):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b

z= Foo(2,3)

it is giving the following error

TypeError: object.__new__() takes exactly one argument (the type to instantiate)
1
  • 2
    What makes you think this shouldn't generate an error? Commented Dec 6, 2019 at 17:37

6 Answers 6

29
    instance = super(Foo, cls).__new__(cls,*args, **kwargs)

is correct. However, you are responsible for first removing arguments that your class introduces, so that when object.__new__ is ultimately called, both *args and **kwargs are empty.

Your code should be something like

class Foo:
    def __new__(cls, a, b, *args, **kwargs):
        print("Creating Instance")
        instance = super(Foo, cls).__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)
        return instance

    def __init__(self, a, b, *args, **kwargs):
            super().__init__(*args, **kwargs)
            self.a = a
            self.b = b

This definition removes your new parameters a and b from args before passing it on to whoever is next on the MRO. Likewise for __init__.

6
  • 12
    It is a good suggestion, but still I cannot understand why if new is not overridden everything works just fine: new is supposed to get cls and constructor arguments. If new is not overridden then it is object.__new__, right? And it gets all these additional parameters (does it?) and never complains, however explicit call super().__new__ fails.
    – serge.v
    Commented Oct 17, 2020 at 19:04
  • Also, it is not always possible to remove "introduced arguments". E.g., class B is a child of some (yet unknown or prone to change) class A and we want just to do something in new, so it makes sense to call super().__new__ and give it all args we received. But if A does not override new then it will fail. It looks kind of inconsistent. Possible practical solution is to check super().__new__ == object.__new__() and if True and send only cls argument. But it looks like a workaround.
    – serge.v
    Commented Oct 17, 2020 at 19:08
  • Good questions. I suspect type.__call__ does something different, depending on whether the class (or an ancestor) overrides __new__, or if ultimately object.__new__ is being called immediately.
    – chepner
    Commented Oct 17, 2020 at 20:08
  • I had to remove *args, **kwargs from super().__init__(*args, **kwargs) to make it work
    – phoxd
    Commented May 9, 2023 at 4:07
  • Yeah, I should clean up and expand this answer. In the mean time, see rhettinger.wordpress.com/2011/05/26/super-considered-super for advice on using super with __init__. (In short, avoid positional arguments, and use keyword arguments exclusively.)
    – chepner
    Commented May 9, 2023 at 12:08
18

object.__new__() signature is (*args, **kwargs), you may check this by using inspect.signature function.

But why then you have this error? TLDR: because you defined custom __new__ method.

Small research

All tests were done on Python 3.9.1.


Consider next class.

class MyClass:
    def __init__(self): pass

Let's call object.__new__() on it:

>>> object.__new__(MyClass, *range(10), **{f'a{i}': i for i in range(10)})
<__main__.MyClass object at 0x000001E7B15B3550>

No problems at all. This class has only custom __init__ and no custom __new__. Now try to do the same call for your Foo:

>>> object.__new__(Foo, *range(10), **{f'a{i}': i for i in range(10)})
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: object.__new__() takes exactly one argument (the type to instantiate)

An exception about object.__new__(). This class has both custom __init__ and __new__. You will see the same error when only custom __new__ is defined:

>>> class OnlyNew:
...     def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs): return super().__new__(cls)
>>> object.__new__(OnlyNew, *range(10), **{f'a{i}': i for i in range(10)})
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: object.__new__() takes exactly one argument (the type to instantiate)

Let's check a class with no custom __init__ and __new__.

>>> class A: pass
>>> object.__new__(A, *range(10), **{f'a{i}': i for i in range(10)})
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: A() takes no arguments

Absolutely different error.


Let's check how it works with inheritance. Derive from A and define __init__.

>>> class B(A):
...     def __init__(self): pass
>>> object.__new__(B, *range(10), **{f'a{i}': i for i in range(10)})
<__main__.B object at 0x000001E7B15D23A0>

Derive from MyClass and define nothing.

>>> class MC(MyClass): pass
>>> object.__new__(MC, *range(10), **{f'a{i}': i for i in range(10)})
<__main__.MC object at 0x000001E7B15D2CA0>

Derive from MyClass and define __new__.

>>> class Sub(MyClass):
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs): return super().__new__(cls)
>>> object.__new__(Sub, *range(10), **{f'a{i}': i for i in range(10)})
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: object.__new__() takes exactly one argument (the type to instantiate)

Derive from Foo and define nothing.

>>> class F(Foo): pass
>>> object.__new__(F, *range(10), **{f'a{i}': i for i in range(10)})
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: object.__new__() takes exactly one argument (the type to instantiate)

And now let's look on an absolutely exotic case:

class Base:
    def __init__(self): pass
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs): return super().__new__(cls)


class Sub(Base):
    def __init__(self): pass
    __new__ = object.__new__


class Free:
    def __init__(self): pass
    __new__ = object.__new__
>>> object.__new__(Free, *range(10), **{f'a{i}': i for i in range(10)})
<__main__.Free object at 0x000001E7B15C5A90>
>>> object.__new__(Sub, *range(10), **{f'a{i}': i for i in range(10)})
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: object.__new__() takes exactly one argument (the type to instantiate)

Both Sub and Free do not have a custom __new__ method - in both classes __new__ is object.__new__(). But creating Sub raises an error while creating Free does not. Seems like object.__new__() checks not getattr(A_Class, '__new__', object.__new__) is object.__new__ but all(getattr(cls, '__new__', object.__new__) is object.__new__ for cls in A_Class.mro()).


Conclusion

  1. If a class has custom __new__ in its MRO, calling object.__new__() with >1 arguments raises TypeError.
  2. If a class has only custom __init__ and does not have custom __new__ in its MRO, calling object.__new__() with >1 arguments creates a proper instance.
  3. If a class does not have both custom __init__ and __new__ in its MRO, calling object.__new__() with >1 arguments raises TypeError.
1
  • 1
    Exotic case was great. It would be awesome if this was documented somewhere.
    – S.B
    Commented Sep 10, 2021 at 20:20
10

In addition to this and this answer, It's good to have this response from Guido van Rossum here.

This addresses the behavior of object.__new__ when overriding or not overriding __new__ in subclasses and what happens to the extra arguments which passed that method.

There's no point in calling object.__new__() with more than a class parameter, and any code that did so was just dumping those args into a black hole.

The only time when it makes sense for object.__new__() to ignore extra arguments is when it's not being overridden, but __init__ is being overridden -- then you have a completely default __new__ and the checking of constructor arguments is relegated to __init__.

The purpose of all this is to catch the error in a call like object(42) which (again) passes an argument that is not used. This is often a symptom of a bug in your program.

from inspect import signature

print(signature(object.__new__))
print('------------------------------')
print(signature(object.__init__))
print('------------------------------')
object(42)

output:

(*args, **kwargs)
------------------------------
(self, /, *args, **kwargs)
------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<>", line 7, in <module>
    object(42)
TypeError: object() takes no arguments
1
  • 2
    +1 This is the actual answer, imo. The accepted answer only explains how to avoid the bug that this is supposed to catch.
    – JMC
    Commented Jan 29, 2022 at 2:10
7

This should work:

class Foo:
    def __new__(cls, a, b):
        print("Creating Instance")
        instance = super(Foo, cls).__new__(cls)
        return instance


    def __init__(self, a, b):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b

foo_1 = Foo(a=1, b=2)
foo_2 = Foo(a=1, b=3)

if you want to use Singleton design pattern, and create instance of class with params in constructor, this should work:

class FooSingleton:
    _instances = {}

    def __new__(cls, a, b):
        if cls not in cls._instances:
            print('creating new FooSingleton instance')
            cls._instances[cls] = super(FooSingleton, cls).__new__(cls)
        else:
            print('using FooSingleton instance')
        return cls._instances[cls]

    def __init__(self, a, b):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b

foo_s1 = FooSingleton(a=1, b=2)
foo_s2 = FooSingleton(a=1, b=3)
1
  • 1
    Thanks, it works, can you explain with details of the python logic here?
    – storenth
    Commented Nov 15, 2022 at 5:56
5

You don't need to worry about passing the arguments up to the superclass. The arguments will also be passed into the __init__ call.

class User(object):
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        # do some logic with the initial parameters

        return super().__new__(cls)
4

object.__new__(cls), param is cls, not (cls, *args, **kwargs)

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