0

I have a function set to find if 100 exists in a string, then remove it if it does exist. It will run until all 100's are removed and then returns 'yes' if the array is now empty or 'no' if it's not empty.

The problem is that it only returns 'no', even though I've confirmed that it's empty.

const hun = (input) => {
  const splitArr = input.split('');
  let empty = 'no';

  if (splitArr.length === 0) {
    console.log('it is equal to 0')
    empty = 'yes';
    return empty;
  };

  for (i = 0; i < splitArr.length; i++) {
    let num = splitArr[i] + splitArr[i + 1] + splitArr[i + 2];
    if (num === '100') {
      splitArr.splice(i, 3);
      hun(splitArr.join(''))
    }
  }
  return empty;
}

console.log(hun('101000'))
console.log(hun('1010001'))

  • do you have some more examples with result? – Nina Scholz Dec 6 '19 at 19:30
  • Just out of curiosity, is there a reason you need to return 'no' or 'yes' as opposed to bools? – Dortimer Dec 6 '19 at 19:30
  • it's returning 'it is equal to 0', then 'no', then 'no'. The first 'no' should be a 'yes'. I'm just returning a string instead of a bool, but even with bool it doesn't work. – Matt Brody Dec 6 '19 at 19:31
  • The return value of any hun that isn’t the top-level one is ignored – hun(splitArr.join('')) is the entire statement. So there’s at least that. It’s in a bit of a suspicious spot, though. – Ry- Dec 6 '19 at 19:33
6

You need to return your function call.

return hun(splitArr.join(''));

const hun = input => {
  const splitArr = input.split('');

  if (splitArr.length === 0) {
    console.log('it is equal to 0');
    return 'yes';
  }

  for (let i = 0; i < splitArr.length; i++) {
    const num = splitArr[i] + splitArr[i + 1] + splitArr[i + 2];
    if (num === '100') {
      splitArr.splice(i, 3);
      return hun(splitArr.join(''));
    }
  }
  return 'no';
}

console.log(hun('101000'))
console.log(hun('1010001'))

1

This would be much easier to do with regex, and much safer.

const hun = str => {
    let prev = str;
    while (true) {
        let result = prev.replace(/100/g, "");
        if (result === prev || !result)
            return result ? "no" : "yes";
        prev = result;
    } 
}

/some regex/ defines regex in Javascript. The g modifier means "global", meaning that it will match all possible instances in the string, not just the first one.

Right now, the code in your for loop can go out of bounds:

  for (i = 0; i < splitArr.length; i++) {
    let num = splitArr[i] + splitArr[i + 1] + splitArr[i + 2];
 ...

i.e. You'll start getting splitArr[i] == undefined if, for example, splitArr.length = 5, once i = 3.

  • 1
    Because it’s JavaScript, though, it’ll be '00undefined' instead of an error and compare “correctly” to '100'. – Ry- Dec 6 '19 at 19:44
  • 1
    A single pass doesn't meet the requirements. Consider the string '110000'. After removing '100' what's left is again '100', which needs to be removed too, and the result should be an empty string. – Alexey Lebedev Dec 6 '19 at 19:48
  • @AlexeyLebedev Thanks, you're right. I rewrote it to make replacements until it gets the same result twice in a row. – Lightning Dec 6 '19 at 20:08
1

Here's a simplified solution that makes a single pass through the string without re-examining the same characters over and over.

The key insight is that as we examine the input characters one by one, we can build a prefix from them where removals can only occur at the end.

function hun(str) {
    let prefix = [];
    for (const char of str) {
        prefix.push(char);
        if (prefix.slice(-3) == '1,0,0') {
            prefix.length -= 3;
        }
    }
    return !prefix.length;
}
0

A simpler solution could be

const hun = str => {
    let value = str
    while(value.includes("100")){
        value = value.replace(/100/g,'')
    }
    
    return value
    }
    
console.log(hun('101000'))
console.log(hun('1010001'))

  • why isn't it correct? the target was to check if there was a 100 in a given string and this returns yes and no as required – Ahmed Gaafer Dec 6 '19 at 19:35
  • Because it doesn't strip out the "100"s, which is the original requirement. – Lightning Dec 6 '19 at 19:36
  • It’s to check whether repeating the process of removing all 100s in the string until there are none left results in an empty string. – Ry- Dec 6 '19 at 19:39
0

You could keep the string and get substrings of left and right side of find and call the function again.

const hun = (input) => {
    if (!input.length) return true;

    for (let i = 0; i < input.length - 2; i++) {
        if (input[i] === '1' && input[i + 1] === '0' && input[i + 2] === '0') {
            return hun(input.slice(0, i) + input.slice(i + 3));
        }
    }

    return false;
};

console.log(hun('101000'));
console.log(hun('1010001'));

0

I think this code is much simpler:

const hun = (input) => {
    let empty = 'no';

    while (input.includes("100")) {
        input = input.replace("100", "");
    }

    if (input === "")
        empty = 'yes';
    
    return empty;
}

console.log(hun(''))
console.log(hun('100'))
console.log(hun('1010'))
console.log(hun('100100'))
console.log(hun('101000'))
console.log(hun('1010001'))

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