11

I was looking at a solution to a puzzle on codewars and I don't understand why it works. How is minus() working?

function makeNum(num, func) {
    if (func === undefined) {
        return num;
    } else {
        return func(num);
    }
}

function three(func) {
    return makeNum(3, func);
}

function eight(func) {
    return makeNum(8, func);
}

function minus(right) {
    return function(left) {
        return left - right;
    };
}

console.log(eight(minus(three()))); // will log out 5

  • Here is a similar question with a slightly different approach which may help shed some light on how this works – Nick Parsons Dec 12 '19 at 5:06
  • 1
    I've voted to close this after failing it as a review audit : it wasn't obvious to me what you didn't understand about it. It would be better if edited to explain why you thought minus shouldn't work. – GS - Apologise to Monica Jan 4 at 19:25
8

It's a bit complicated. :-)

console.log(eight(minus(three()))); is run from the inside out, so let's follow it through:

  • three() - calls makeNum(3, undefined) and returns what it returns. makeNum(3, undefined) returns 3, so that's the return value.
  • minus(3) - calls minus, passing in 3 as right. minus returns a new function that closes over right.
  • eight(...) - calls makeNum(8, fnFromMinus) where fnFromMinus is the function that was returned by minus(3). makeNum(8, fnFromMinus) does fnFromMinus, passing in 8 as left. fnFromMinus returns the result of left - right (remember that right is 3, fnFromMinus closed over it).

Since 8 - 3 is 5, the final result is 5, which console.log returns.

Here's an instrumented version:

let indent = 0;
function show(label) {
    console.log(" ".repeat(indent * 4) + label);
}
function fname(fn) {
    return fn ? fn.name : "undefined";
}

function makeNum(num, func) {
    const descr = `makeNum(${num}, ${fname(func)})`;
    show(descr);
    ++indent;
    if (func === undefined) {
        --indent;
        show(`${descr} returns ${num}`);
        return num;
    } else {
        const rv = func(num);
        --indent;
        show(`${descr} returns ${num}`);
        return rv;
    }
}

function three(func) {
    const descr = `three(${fname(func)})`;
    console.log(descr);
    ++indent;
    const rv = makeNum(3, func);
    --indent;
    show(descr + ` returns ${rv}`);
    return rv;
}

function eight(func) {
    const descr = `eight(${fname(func)})`;
    console.log(descr);
    ++indent;
    const rv = makeNum(8, func);
    --indent;
    show(descr + ` returns ${rv}`);
    return rv;
}

function minus(right) {
    const fn = function fnFromMinus(left) {
        show(`${fname(fn)} returns ${left} - ${right} = ${left - right}`);
        return left - right;
    };
    try {
        // For browsers that don't do `name` properly
        fn.name = "fnFromMinus";
    } catch (e) { }
    show(`minus(${right}) returns ${fname(fn)}`);
    return fn;
}

console.log(eight(minus(three()))); // will log out 5
.as-console-wrapper {
    max-height: 100% !important;£
}

2

It's actually not that complicated if you work through it step by step. Let's work from the inside out. Calling:

three()

without a parameter means you're passing an undefined value as func. So it's the same as saying:

makeNum(3, undefined)

When makeNum sees that func is undefined, it returns num, which is 3.

So we've reduced this down to:

eight(minus(3))

Now let's see how

minus(3)

evaluates. minus sees that the parameter you've provided is 3, so it returns a function that can accept a "left" parameter and subtract the 3 that we've already provided from it. It does NOT execute. It just sits there, waiting to be called with a "left" parameter so it can subtract 3 from it.

So we've reduced this down to:

eight(function(left){
    return left - 3;
})

Now let's see how this evaluates. eight is called with the func parameter being this function:

function(left){
    return left - 3;
}

It then passes 8 and this function to makeNum when it says:

makeNum(8, func)

makeNum then sees that func has been provided (and is therefore not undefined) and returns func(num) back to the eight function, which is the same as passing:

8 - 3

back to the eight function. The eight function receives that value and then returns it. So we've reduced this down to:

5

which gets logged in the console.

0

minus returns a new function for each invocation with the parameters passed to it being captured. When the returned function is called it may reference the parameters passed when called, in addition to any parameters passed to it. This is one way to curry functions in JavaScript.

0

This code is an example of Higher Order Functions in functional programming languages like js. Javascript functions are treated as objects and they can be passed and returned too.

A Higher-Order function is a function that receives a function as an argument or returns the function as output.

minus is returning an anonymous(a function with no defined name) function basically as :

function(left) {
        return left - 3; //right = 3
    };

This function when passed to eight is get called as func(8) which then give result as 5

0

Another way to look at it--you can rewrite this line:

console.log(eight(minus(three())));

As:

const threeResult = three(); // = 3
const minusResult = minus(threeResult); // = a function that subtracts 3
const eightResult = eights(minusResult); // = 5

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