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Imagine we have a generic enum like this:

enum GenericEnum<T> {
    case typed(T)
    case untyped(Error)
}

For the sake of easier access for some UI work, we have to implement an extension for this:

extension GenericEnum {
    
    var validValue: T? {
        if case .typed(let value) = self {
            return value
        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }
}

validValue returns the actual value or nil. And we can use it like:

let genericEnums = [GenericEnum.typed(1), GenericEnum.typed(2), GenericEnum.typed(3)]
let result = genericEnums.compactMap { $0.validValue }

So far, so good.

The issue

Now for more easy to call code, I want to move the usage method into an extension on the Array like:

extension Array where Element == GenericEnum<Int> { // `Int` should be generic here
    var customCompacted: [Int] { // `Int` should be generic here
        compactMap { $0.validValue }
    }
}

But I need Int to be generic, but all attempts raise an error like:

Reference to generic type 'GenericEnum' requires arguments in <...>

And more different errors about generics and constraints. How can I make this generic?


The example provided in this question is just for others to quickly reproduce the situation and may not use in the real world project. The answer is going to show how we can use some of the powered features of Swift

  • Do you mean you want to add an extension to arrays of any kind of GenericEnum? – Sweeper Dec 8 '19 at 8:36
  • Exactly @Sweeper. – Mojtaba Hosseini Dec 8 '19 at 8:36
  • IDK exactly what your call sites look like but I'm not a fan of making an extension to tuck such frequent operations away. compactMap { $0.validValue } is short and well recognized, so I'm not sure customCompacted carries its weight – Alexander - Reinstate Monica Dec 8 '19 at 13:35
  • Me neither @Alexander-ReinstateMonica. That is just an example to prepare the situation for others and the real situation is different a bit. I'm trying to improve my knowledge about Generics and Constraints. Thanks for mentioning that by the way. – Mojtaba Hosseini Dec 8 '19 at 13:51
  • @MojtabaHosseini It's good to mention that in your question. "Frame challenges" are often unpopular, but are actually some of the most useful responses to questions. Often people paint themselves into corners, solving problems they don't actually need to solve :p – Alexander - Reinstate Monica Dec 8 '19 at 15:23
1

I think that you cannot constrain an extension like that. But you can define a constrained method instead:

extension Array {
    func customCompacted<T>() -> [T] where Element == GenericEnum<T> {
        return compactMap { $0.validValue }
    }
}

Usage examples:

let genericInts = [GenericEnum.typed(1), GenericEnum.typed(2), GenericEnum.typed(3)]
print(genericInts.customCompacted()) // [1, 2, 3]

let genericDoubles = [GenericEnum.typed(1.0), GenericEnum.typed(2.0), GenericEnum.typed(3.0)]
print(genericDoubles.customCompacted()) // [1.0, 2.0, 3.0]

An alternative is to define a protocol to which GenericEnum conforms:

enum GenericEnum<T> {
    case typed(T)
    case untyped(Error)
}

protocol GenericEnumProtocol {
    associatedtype T
    var validValue: T? { get }
}

extension GenericEnum: GenericEnumProtocol {
    var validValue: T? {
        if case .typed(let value) = self {
            return value
        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }
}

extension Array where Element : GenericEnumProtocol {
    var customCompacted: [Element.T] { // `Int` should be generic here
        compactMap { $0.validValue }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks Martin. I was thinking about this. But this is a func instead of var (not very important) and not constrained as we think. I leave it open. Maybe we think wrong. 🤷🏻‍♂️ – Mojtaba Hosseini Dec 8 '19 at 8:46
  • @MojtabaHosseini: How would you like it to be constrained instead? – Martin R Dec 8 '19 at 9:37
  • Like the alternative you provided. Perfect for the situation I faced. Thanks as always. – Mojtaba Hosseini Dec 8 '19 at 10:16

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