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I have a project that parses pushes from pushbullet and executes functions based on input. Here is my Push class:

class Push():
    def __init__(self, push):
        r = push
        self.iden = r['iden']
        self.type = r['type']
        if self.type == 'note':
            self.body = r['body']
    def register(self):
        self.is_processed = False
        push_log.append_iden(self.iden)
    def expire(self):
        self.is_processed = True
        push_log.update_status(self.iden)
    def is_command(self):
        if '!' in self.body:
            return True
        else:
            return False

So when the program detects a command, it runs another set of class function:

    def process_command(self):
        if 'shoot' in self.body:
            try:
                shoot()
                self.expire()
            except:
                self.expire()
        elif 'getip' in self.body:
            try:
                get_ip()
                self.expire()
            except:
                self.expire()
        elif 'wol' in self.body:
            try:
                ip = self.body.split(" ")[1]
                wake_on_lan(ip)
                self.expire()
            except:
                self.expire()

Notice that get_ip(), wake_on_lan(ip) and shoot() are not defined in class. However i'd like to avoid code repetition as much as possible. So i'm trying to re-write the process_command(self) function. I specifically want to avoid repeating self.expire() try/except clauses.

 def process_command(self):
        command_list = ['shoot', 'getip', 'wol']
        for command in command_list:
            if command in self.body:
                try:
                        # do something 
                        self.expire()
                    else:
                        self.expire()
                except:
                    self.expire

Which partially solves my problem. Is this a sane approach? I want to improve it by providing a tuple of (input command, function to execute) e.g.

command_list = [('shoot', shoot()), ('getip', get_ip()), ('wol', wake_on_lan(self.body.split(" ")[1]))]

However functions are executed on the go. Is there a better way of doing this?

EDIT

Based on responses here's the edited process_command. Thanks @deceze, @Jean and @Thierry.

    def process_command(self):
        command_count = 0
        command_dict = {
            'shoot': shoot,
            'getip': get_ip,
            'wol': wake_on_lan
        }
        for command in command_dict.keys():
            if command in self.body:
                try:
                    if command_count < 2:
                        # do something

                    else:
                        # do something else
                except:
                    # raise/catch exception
                finally:
                    self.expire()
  • 1
    Just don't include self.expire inside the try block, since you want to run it unconditionally in any case, and just put it after the entire if..else block…!? – deceze Dec 9 '19 at 8:15
  • 1
    Remove the parentheses at the end of the function names in your tuples so they don't get called, and call them later. Note that a dict would be better here. – Thierry Lathuille Dec 9 '19 at 8:15
  • 1
    @deceze I guess self.expire() should be put in a finally: block for it to run no matter what. – Jean-François Corbett Dec 9 '19 at 8:18
  • 1
    @Jean Depends on what exactly the code is supposed to do. If you're catching all possible exceptions in each individual case in the if..else block, there's no big need for a grand finally. But yes, perhaps this can be restructured into try: if .... finally: self.expire(). – deceze Dec 9 '19 at 8:19
  • 3
    Consider posting this on codereview.stackexchange.com – deceze Dec 9 '19 at 8:20
3

There is a lot of stuff in your question. I'm going to address the only part that is clear to me:

I specifically want to avoid repeating self.expire() try/except clauses.

Your self.expire() really only needs to appear once in a finally: block, like this:

try:
    # do something 
except:
    # Handle exceptions, perhaps re-raise some exceptions
finally:
    self.expire()  # Will run no matter what
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