8

I'd like to find the contiguous sequences of equal elements (e.g. of length 2) in a list

my @s = <1 1 0 2 0 2 1 2 2 2 4 4 3 3>;
say grep {$^a eq $^b}, @s;

# ==> ((1 1) (2 2) (4 4) (3 3))

This code looks ok but when one more 2 is added after the sequence of 2 2 2 or when one 2 is removed from it, it says Too few positionals passed; expected 2 arguments but got 1 How to fix it? Please note that I'm trying to find them without using for loop, i.e. I'm trying to find them using a functional code as much as possible.

Optional: In the bold printed section:

<1 1 0 2 0 2 1 2 2 2 4 4 3 3>

multiple sequences of 2 2 are seen. How to print them the number of times they are seen? Like:

((1 1) (2 2) (2 2) (4 4) (3 3))
8

There are an even number of elements in your input:

say elems <1 1 0 2 0 2 1 2 2 2 4 4 3 3>; # 14

Your grep block consumes two elements each time:

{$^a eq $^b}

So if you add or remove an element you'll get the error you're getting when the block is run on the single element left over at the end.


There are many ways to solve your problem.

But you also asked about the option of allowing for overlapping so, for example, you get two (2 2) sub-lists when the sequence 2 2 2 is encountered. And, in a similar vein, you presumably want to see two matches, not zero, with input like:

<1 2 2 3 3 4>

So I'll focus on solutions that deal with those issues too.

Despite the narrowing of solution space to deal with the extra issues, there are still many ways to express solutions functionally.


One way that just appends a bit more code to the end of yours:

my @s = <1 1 0 2 0 2 1 2 2 2 4 4 3 3>;
say grep {$^a eq $^b}, @s .rotor( 2 => -1 ) .flat

The .rotor method converts a list into a list of sub-lists, each of the same length. For example, say <1 2 3 4> .rotor: 2 displays ((1 2) (3 4)). If the length argument is a pair, then the key is the length and the value is an offset for starting the next pair. If the offset is negative you get sub-list overlap. Thus say <1 2 3 4> .rotor: 2 => -1 displays ((1 2) (2 3) (3 4)).

The .flat method "flattens" its invocant. For example, say ((1,2),(2,3),(3,4)) .flat displays (1 2 2 3 3 4).

A perhaps more readable way to write the above solution would be to omit the flat and use .[0] and .[1] to index into the sub-lists returned by rotor:

say @s .rotor( 2 => -1 ) .grep: { .[0] eq .[1] }

See also Elizabeth Mattijsen's comment for another variation that generalizes for any sub-list size.


If you needed a more general coding pattern you might write something like:

say @s .pairs .map: { .value xx 2 if .key < @s - 1 and [eq] @s[.key,.key+1] }

The .pairs method on a list returns a list of pairs, each pair corresponding to each of the elements in its invocant list. The .key of each pair is the index of the element in the invocant list; the .value is the value of the element.

.value xx 2 could have been written .value, .value. (See xx.)

@s - 1 is the number of elements in @s minus 1.

The [eq] in [eq] list is a reduction.


If you need text pattern matching to decide what constitutes contiguous equal elements you might convert the input list into a string, match against that using one of the match adverbs that generate a list of matches, then map from the resulting list of matches to your desired result. To match with overlaps (eg 2 2 2 results in ((2 2) (2 2)) use :ov:

say @s .Str .match( / (.) ' ' $0 /, :ov ) .map: { .[0].Str xx 2 }
  • It works quite fine. When I add 2 2s to make the sequence 2 2 2 2 it prints 3 (2 2)s which is as expected. Never heard of the method rotor I've initially come up with the squishmethod and checked if it has features or arguments like @s.squish(:length 2, :multiple_instances yes) but it didn't have such features and it was no fit for the task. Compared with the squish, rotor seems quite fit. Actually it might even be the fittest one for this type of operation. – Lars Malmsteen Dec 10 '19 at 13:07
  • 3
    my $size = 2; say <1 1 0 2 0 2 1 2 2 2 4 4 3 3>.rotor( $size => -$size + 1).grep: { [eq] $_ } # ((1 1) (2 2) (2 2) (4 4) (3 3)) You only need to adjust the $size for different lengths of sequences. – Elizabeth Mattijsen Dec 10 '19 at 18:09
  • Hi again @LarsMalmsteen. Please LMK if you think the two alternatives to rotor that I've added have weakened or strengthened my answer. – raiph Dec 16 '19 at 23:32
  • The refined version of the rotor solution i.e. say @s.rotor(2=>-1).grep:{.[0]eq.[1]} is welcome because it 's both shorter (by 3 to 5 chars depending on how the spaces are counted) and still looks decent. The generalized versions without the rotor method are welcome too because they show how some quirks like the xx and :ov are used. So the problem is very well solved :) – Lars Malmsteen Dec 17 '19 at 22:15
5

TIMTOWDI!

Here's an iterative approach using gather/take.

say gather for <1 1 0 2 0 2 1 2 2 2 4 4 3 3> { 
    state $last = ''; 
    take ($last, $_) if $last == $_; 
    $last = $_; 
};

# ((1 1) (2 2) (2 2) (4 4) (3 3))
  • Thank you for the answer. That looks quite fine in its own right. The take ($last, $_) part is a decent example on the usage of the gather and take duo. – Lars Malmsteen Dec 12 '19 at 19:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.