46

I use the following Github Actions workflow for my C project. The workflow finishes in ~40 seconds, but more than half of that time is spent by installing the valgrind package and its dependencies.

I believe caching could help me speed up the workflow. I do not mind waiting a couple of extra seconds, but this just seems like a pointless waste of GitHub's resources.

name: C Workflow

on: [push, pull_request]

jobs:
  build:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest

    steps:
    - uses: actions/checkout@v1

    - name: make
      run: make

    - name: valgrind
      run: |
        sudo apt-get install -y valgrind
        valgrind -v --leak-check=full --show-leak-kinds=all ./bin

Running sudo apt-get install -y valgrind installs the following packages:

  • gdb
  • gdbserver
  • libbabeltrace1
  • libc6-dbg
  • libipt1
  • valgrind

I know Actions support caching of a specific directory (and there are already several answered SO questions and articles about this), but I am not sure where all the different packages installed by apt end up. I assume /bin/ or /usr/bin/ are not the only directories affected by installing packages.

Is there an elegant way to cache the installed system packages for future workflow runs?

4 Answers 4

37

The purpose of this answer is to show how caching can be done with github actions, not necessarily to show how to cache valgrind, (which it does). I also try to explain why not everything can/should be cached, because the cost (in terms of time) of caching and restoring a cache, vs reinstalling the dependency needs to be taken into account.


You will make use of the actions/cache action to do this.

Add it as a step (before you need to use valgrind):

- name: Cache valgrind
  uses: actions/cache@v2
  id: cache-valgrind
  with:
      path: "~/valgrind"
      key: ${{secrets.VALGRIND_VERSION}}

The next step should attempt to install the cached version if any or install from the repositories:

- name: Install valgrind
  env:
    CACHE_HIT: ${{steps.cache-valgrind.outputs.cache-hit}}
    VALGRIND_VERSION: ${{secrets.VALGRIND_VERSION}}
  run: |
      if [[ "$CACHE_HIT" == 'true' ]]; then
        sudo cp --verbose --force --recursive ~/valgrind/* /
      else
        sudo apt-get install --yes valgrind="$VALGRIND_VERSION"
        mkdir -p ~/valgrind
        sudo dpkg -L valgrind | while IFS= read -r f; do if test -f $f; then echo $f; fi; done | xargs cp --parents --target-directory ~/valgrind/
      fi

Explanation

Set VALGRIND_VERSION secret to be the output of:

apt-cache policy valgrind | grep -oP '(?<=Candidate:\s)(.+)'

this will allow you to invalidate the cache when a new version is released simply by changing the value of the secret.

dpkg -L valgrind is used to list all the files installed when using sudo apt-get install valgrind.

What we can now do with this command is to copy all the dependencies to our cache folder:

dpkg -L valgrind | while IFS= read -r f; do if test -f $f; then echo $f; fi; done | xargs cp --parents --target-directory ~/valgrind/

Furthermore

In addition to copying all the components of valgrind, it may also be necessary to copy the dependencies (such as libc in this case), but I don't recommend continuing along this path because the dependency chain just grows from there. To be precise, the dependencies needed to copy to finally have an environment suitable for valgrind to run in is as follows:

  • libc6
  • libgcc1
  • gcc-8-base

To copy all these dependencies, you can use the same syntax as above:

for dep in libc6 libgcc1 gcc-8-base; do
    dpkg -L $dep | while IFS= read -r f; do if test -f $f; then echo $f; fi; done | xargs cp --parents --target-directory ~/valgrind/
done

Is all this work really worth the trouble when all that is required to install valgrind in the first place is to simply run sudo apt-get install valgrind? If your goal is to speed up the build process, then you also have to take into consideration the amount of time it is taking to restore (downloading, and extracting) the cache vs simply running the command again to install valgrind.


And finally to restore the cache, assuming it is stored at /tmp/valgrind, you can use the command:

cp --force --recursive /tmp/valgrind/* /

Which will basically copy all the files from the cache unto the root partition.

In addition to the process above, I also have an example of "caching valgrind" by installing and compiling it from source. The cache is now about 63MB (compressed) in size and one still needs to separately install libc which kind of defeats the purpose.


Note: Another answer to this question proposes what I could consider to be a safer approach to caching dependencies, by using a container which comes with the dependencies pre-installed. The best part is that you can use actions to keep those containers up-to-date.

References:

10
  • Oh, I see, that's ingenious. I had no idea you could safely take all the installed files and just move them to another directory without breaking something. I'm not sure it works though. I ran the workflow 3 times and always go Cache not found for input keys: ***.. I added the VALGRIND_VERSION secret in Settings > Secrets, is that right?
    – natiiix
    Dec 11, 2019 at 9:30
  • I've managed to get a cache hit now, but I'm getting the following error from valgrind: --2906-- Reading syms from /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.27.so --2906-- Considering /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/ld-2.27.so .. --2906-- .. CRC mismatch (computed 1b7c895e wanted 2943108a) --2906-- object doesn't have a symbol table
    – natiiix
    Dec 11, 2019 at 10:48
  • @natiiix there is a possibility that caching valgrind made it so that libc dependency is not installed when the cache is retrieved. I am not near a monitor now, but I looked up your error and it seems like it is a bug with valgrind. You can try also installing libc version 6 and see if that helps. I will update the answer later today
    – smac89
    Dec 11, 2019 at 14:50
  • 1
    Yes, it seems so. If I add sudo apt-get install -y libc6-dbg, then it works fine, but then I'm also where I started because the installation of that package takes 30 more seconds.
    – natiiix
    Dec 11, 2019 at 20:19
  • @natiiix It seems that caching valgrind may be more work than anticipated, but atleast this shows how caching can be done on ubuntu. Looking at the dependencies of valgrind, there is atleast 6 dependencies, and I think they probably all need to be cached if this is to work.
    – smac89
    Dec 11, 2019 at 20:21
34

You could create a docker image with valgrind preinstalled and run your workflow on that.

Create a Dockerfile with something like:

FROM ubuntu

RUN apt-get install -y valgrind

Build it and push it to dockerhub:

docker build -t natiiix/valgrind .
docker push natiiix/valgrind

Then use something like the following as your workflow:

name: C Workflow

on: [push, pull_request]

jobs:
  build:
    container: natiiix/valgrind

    steps:
    - uses: actions/checkout@v1

    - name: make
      run: make

    - name: valgrind
      run: valgrind -v --leak-check=full --show-leak-kinds=all ./bin

Completely untested, but you get the idea.

8
  • 2
    This is a very interesting idea, but it kind of undermines the whole principle of letting GitHub Actions cache the environment / artifacts for future runs and instead requires some additional effort from my side. On the other hand, once done, this could probably be reused quite easily.
    – natiiix
    Mar 30, 2020 at 12:29
  • 5
    It's up to you to decide what works best for you, or what requires the most offort from your side ¯_(ツ)_/¯
    – deivid
    Mar 31, 2020 at 19:13
  • 3
    Personally I think this is the most sensible answer, since other answers that show cache the dependency manually show how fraught that is. Jan 23, 2021 at 2:58
  • 1
    I honestly like this idea better than my answer. You can even create a separate workflow that continuously builds the container and deploys to github itself
    – smac89
    Apr 18, 2021 at 3:36
  • 2
    This is the way. The accepted answer is hyper-fragile and clearly guaranteed to fail. While deploying yet another third-party hosting service also adds a modicum of fragility, the one-line triviality of this solution speaks volumes for Docker. Like it or (more likely) not, this is the only sane solution for caching system-wide apt packages. Mar 25, 2022 at 5:59
9

Updated: I created a GitHub action which work as this solution, less code and better optimizations. Cache Anything New

This solution is similar to the most voted. I tried the proposed solution but it didn't work for me because I was installing texlive-latex, and pandoc which has many dependencies and sub-dependencies.

I created a solution which should help many people. One case is when you install a couple of packages (apt install), the other solution is when you make a program and it takes for a while.

Solution:

  1. Step which has all the logic, it will cache.
    • Use find to create a list of all the files in the container.
    • Install all the packages or make the programs, whatever that you want to cache.
    • Use find to create a list of all the files in the container.
    • Use diff to get the new created files.
    • Add these new files to the cache directory. This directory will automatically store with actions/cache@v2.
  2. Step which load the created cache.
    • Copy all the files from the cache directory to the main path /.
  3. Steps which will be benefited by the cache and other steps that you need.

When to use this?

  • I didn't use cache, the installation of the packages was around ~2 minutes to finish all the process.
  • With the cache, it takes 7~10 minutes to create it the first time.
    • Using the cache takes ~ 1 minute to finish all the process.
  • It is useful only if your main process take a lot of time also it is convenient if you're deploying very often.

Implementation:

release.yml

name: CI - Release books

on:
  release:
    types: [ released ]
  workflow_dispatch:

jobs:
  build:
    runs-on: ubuntu-18.04
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2

      - uses: actions/cache@v2
        id: cache-packages
        with:
          path: ${{ runner.temp }}/cache-linux
          key: ${{ runner.os }}-cache-packages-v2.1

      - name: Install packages
        if: steps.cache-packages.outputs.cache-hit != 'true'
        env:
          SOURCE: ${{ runner.temp }}/cache-linux
        run: |
          set +xv
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Action environment variables"
          echo "github.workspace: ${{ github.workspace }}"
          echo "runner.workspace: ${{ runner.workspace }}"
          echo "runner.os: ${{ runner.os }}"
          echo "runner.temp: ${{ runner.temp }}"
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Where am I?"
          pwd
          echo "SOURCE: ${SOURCE}"
          ls -lha /
          sudo du -h -d 1 / 2> /dev/null || true
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# APT update"
          sudo apt update
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Set up snapshot"
          mkdir -p "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Install tools"
          sudo rm -f /var/lib/apt/lists/lock
          #sudo apt install -y vim bash-completion
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Take first snapshot"
          sudo find / \
                -type f,l \
                -not \( -path "/sys*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/proc*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/mnt*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/dev*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/run*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/etc/mtab*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/var/cache/apt/archives*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/tmp*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/var/tmp*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/var/backups*" \) \
                -not \( -path "/boot*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/vmlinuz*" -prune \) \
                > "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_01.txt 2> /dev/null \
                || true
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Install pandoc and dependencies"
          sudo apt install -y texlive-latex-extra wget
          wget -q https://github.com/jgm/pandoc/releases/download/2.11.2/pandoc-2.11.2-1-amd64.deb
          sudo dpkg -i pandoc-2.11.2-1-amd64.deb
          rm -f pandoc-2.11.2-1-amd64.deb
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Take second snapshot"
          sudo find / \
                -type f,l \
                -not \( -path "/sys*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/proc*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/mnt*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/dev*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/run*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/etc/mtab*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/var/cache/apt/archives*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/tmp*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/var/tmp*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/var/backups*" \) \
                -not \( -path "/boot*" -prune \) \
                -not \( -path "/vmlinuz*" -prune \) \
                > "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_02.txt 2> /dev/null \
                || true
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Filter new files"
          diff -C 1 \
              --color=always \
              "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_01.txt \
              "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_02.txt \
              | grep -E "^\+" \
              | sed -E s/..// \
              > "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_new_files.txt
          < "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_new_files.txt wc -l
          ls -lha "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Make cache directory"
          rm -fR "${SOURCE}"
          mkdir -p "${SOURCE}"
          while IFS= read -r LINE
          do
            sudo cp -a --parent "${LINE}" "${SOURCE}"
          done < "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_new_files.txt
          ls -lha "${SOURCE}"
          echo ""
          sudo du -sh "${SOURCE}" || true
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"

      - name: Copy cached packages
        if: steps.cache-packages.outputs.cache-hit == 'true'
        env:
          SOURCE: ${{ runner.temp }}/cache-linux
        run: |
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Using Cached packages"
          ls -lha "${SOURCE}"
          sudo cp --force --recursive "${SOURCE}"/. /
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"

      - name: Generate release files and commit in GitHub
        run: |
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Generating release files"
          git fetch --all
          git pull --rebase origin main
          git checkout main
          cd ./src/programming-from-the-ground-up
          ./make.sh
          cd ../../
          ls -lha release/
          git config --global user.name 'Israel Roldan'
          git config --global user.email 'israel.alberto.rv@gmail.com'
          git add .
          git status
          git commit -m "Automated Release."
          git push
          git status
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"

Explaining some pieces of the code:

Here the action cache, indicate a key which will be generated once and compare in later executions. The path is the directory where the files should be to generate the cache compressed file.

      - uses: actions/cache@v2
        id: cache-packages
        with:
          path: ${{ runner.temp }}/cache-linux
          key: ${{ runner.os }}-cache-packages-v2.1

This conditional search for the key cache, if it exits the cache-hit is 'true'.

if: steps.cache-packages.outputs.cache-hit != 'true'
if: steps.cache-packages.outputs.cache-hit == 'true'

It's not critical but when the du command executes at first time, Linux indexed all the files (5~8 minutes), then when we will use the find, it will take only ~50 seconds to get all the files. You can delete this line, if you want.

The suffixed command || true prevents that 2> /dev/null return error otherwise the action will stop because it will detect that your script has an error output. You will see during the script a couple of theses.

sudo du -h -d 1 / 2> /dev/null || true

This is the magical part, use find to generate a list of the actual files, excluding some directories to optimize the cache folder. It also will be executed after the installations and make programs. In the next snapshot the file name should be different snapshot_02.txt.

sudo find / \
      -type f,l \
      -not \( -path "/sys*" -prune \) \
      -not \( -path "/proc*" -prune \) \
      -not \( -path "/mnt*" -prune \) \
      -not \( -path "/dev*" -prune \) \
      -not \( -path "/run*" -prune \) \
      -not \( -path "/etc/mtab*" -prune \) \
      -not \( -path "/var/cache/apt/archives*" -prune \) \
      -not \( -path "/tmp*" -prune \) \
      -not \( -path "/var/tmp*" -prune \) \
      -not \( -path "/var/backups*" \) \
      -not \( -path "/boot*" -prune \) \
      -not \( -path "/vmlinuz*" -prune \) \
      > "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_01.txt 2> /dev/null \
      || true

Install some packages and pandoc.

sudo apt install -y texlive-latex-extra wget
wget -q https://github.com/jgm/pandoc/releases/download/2.11.2/pandoc-2.11.2-1-amd64.deb
sudo dpkg -i pandoc-2.11.2-1-amd64.deb
rm -f pandoc-2.11.2-1-amd64.deb

Generate the text file with the new files added, the files could be symbolic files, too.

diff -C 1 \
      "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_01.txt \
      "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_02.txt \
      | grep -E "^\+" \
      | sed -E s/..// \
      > "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_new_files.txt

At the end copy all the files into the cache directory as an archive to keep the original information.

while IFS= read -r LINE
do
  sudo cp -a --parent "${LINE}" "${SOURCE}"
done < "${{ runner.temp }}"/snapshots/snapshot_new_files.txt

Step to copy all the cached files into the main path /.

      - name: Copy cached packages
        if: steps.cache-packages.outputs.cache-hit == 'true'
        env:
          SOURCE: ${{ runner.temp }}/cache-linux
        run: |
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Using Cached packages"
          ls -lha "${SOURCE}"
          sudo cp --force --recursive "${SOURCE}"/. /
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"

This step is where I'm using the installed packages generated by the cache, the ./make.sh script use pandoc to do some conversions. As I mentioned, you can create other steps which use the cache benefits or another which not use the cache.

      - name: Generate release files and commit in GitHub
        run: |
          echo "# --------------------------------------------------------"
          echo "# Generating release files"
          cd ./src/programming-from-the-ground-up
          ./make.sh
5

Just for instance, there is already exists several implementations:

1
  • Thank you for keeping this question's answers updated even after nearly 3 years. When I originally asked, Actions was still a closed beta feature, and it's obviously widely adopted across industries nowadays, so it's a very different situation with an incredibly different level of support from all sides.
    – natiiix
    Aug 27, 2022 at 13:58

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