2

I'm trying to create a script to remove all docstrings inside a folder. To do so, I'd like to make a regex as efficient as possible.

I've started with this one:

import re

doc_reg = r'(class|def)(.+)\s+("""[\w\s\(\)\-\,\;\:]+""")'

file_content = '''
"""
Mycopyright (c)
"""

from abc import d

class MyClass(MotherClass):
    """
    Some;
    Multi-
    Line Docstring:
    """

    def __init__(self, my_param):
        """Docstring"""
        self.my_param = my_param

def test_fctn():
    """
    Some Docstring
    """

    return True

def test_fctn():
    some_string = """
    Some Docstring
    """

    return some_string
'''

print(re.sub(doc_reg, r'\1\2', file_content))

It works quite well but I'm pretty sure it's possible to make this regex more efficient.

Thanks

4
  • \b(class|def)(.+)\s+"{3}[\w\s(),;:-]+"{3} is 345 vs 607 steps (262 fewer)?
    – ctwheels
    Dec 10 '19 at 15:01
  • It's just that I'm processing quite many files, it takes a lot of time. As I'm far from being a regex expert I thought there might be a way to improve that.
    – RobinFrcd
    Dec 10 '19 at 15:04
  • 2
    Have you benchmarked anything? I would bet that 95% of the processing time is reading the file and/or writing it back to the filesystem.
    – MonkeyZeus
    Dec 10 '19 at 15:17
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it belongs to codereview.stackexchange.com
    – Toto
    Dec 10 '19 at 15:55
2

There are a few things you can do to make it more efficient and some things you can also do to make it shorter/cleaner.

Original (607 steps)

(class|def)(.+)\s+("""[\w\s\(\)\-\,\;\:]+""")

Cleaning

You don't need to but a backslash before each character in a set. This may also have almost insignificant improvements in performance since sre_parse.py won't call _class_escape on line 554 (I'm using Python 3.8.0 as reference).

(class|def)(.+)\s+("""[\w\s(),;:-]+""")

Efficiency

Quantifiers

Use quantifiers for repeated characters (595 steps).

(class|def)(.+)\s+("{3}[\w\s(),;:-]+"{3})
                    ^^^              ^^^

Unneeded Capture Group

Remove unneeded capture groups (588 steps)

(class|def)(.+)\s+"{3}[\w\s(),;:-]+"{3}
                 ^^                   ^^

Anchor

Anchor when possible (345 steps)

\b(class|def)(.+)\s+"{3}[\w\s(),;:-]+"{3}
^^

Reducing Groups

Combine groups if possible (337 steps) - replacement now becomes \1

\b(class.+|def.+)\s+"{3}[\w\s(),;:-]+"{3}
  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Change Alternation Order

Changing class|def to def|class can also impact performance if you suspect more def than class instances (336 steps)

\b(def.+|class.+)\s+"{3}[\w\s(),;:-]+"{3}
  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
6
  • Thank for your detailed answer! The funny thing is that even if the last regex (with anchor) has almost 2 fewer steps it's about 50% slower than the one without it. Thanks anyway, your regex is much cleaner than mine!
    – RobinFrcd
    Dec 10 '19 at 15:19
  • @RobinFrcd it depends on the data you're parsing - assuming this is a subset of the data, it can vary.
    – ctwheels
    Dec 10 '19 at 15:21
  • @MonkeyZeus I'm aware - if you're referencing the regex101 link, steps don't appear on the python version.
    – ctwheels
    Dec 10 '19 at 15:34
  • @ctwheels That's news to me. JS doesn't show steps. Your regex is invalid for Python.
    – MonkeyZeus
    Dec 10 '19 at 15:36
  • @MonkeyZeus change the delimiter.
    – ctwheels
    Dec 10 '19 at 15:37
0

Generally, it is a very bad idea to parse source code (any, not only Python) using regular expressions. It is very buggy, hard in the future support and doesn't work as expected for any source code block.

Python has a great builtin library named ast which provides Python's internal parser which parses source code into tree structures that you can walk passthrough or modify (what we want).

Ok, here is a working example with a bit modified source code for analysis (added function in function to make the example harder =).

clean.py

import ast

import astor  # read more at https://astor.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

parsed = ast.parse(open('source.py').read())

for node in ast.walk(parsed):
    # let's work only on functions & classes definitions
    if not isinstance(node, (ast.FunctionDef, ast.ClassDef, ast.AsyncFunctionDef)):
        continue

    if not len(node.body):
        continue

    if not isinstance(node.body[0], ast.Expr):
        continue

    if not hasattr(node.body[0], 'value') or not isinstance(node.body[0].value, ast.Str):
        continue

    # Uncomment lines below if you want print what and where we are removing
    # print(node)
    # print(node.body[0].value.s)

    node.body = node.body[1:]

print('***** Processed source code output ******\n=========================================')

print(astor.to_source(parsed))

source.py

"""
Mycopyright (c)
"""

from abc import d


class MyClass(MotherClass):
    """
    Some;
    Multi-
    Line Docstring:
    """

    def __init__(self, my_param):
        """Docstring"""
        self.my_param = my_param


def test_fctn():
    """
    Some Docstring
    """

    def _wrapped(omg):
        "some extra docstring"
        pass

    return True


def test_fctn():
    some_string = """
    Some Docstring
    """

    return some_string

and console output, I've just printed it to make it easy for the case.

console.log

python clean.py
***** Processed source code output ******
=========================================
"""
Mycopyright (c)
"""
from abc import d


class MyClass(MotherClass):

    def __init__(self, my_param):
        self.my_param = my_param


def test_fctn():

    def _wrapped(omg):
        pass
    return True


def test_fctn():
    some_string = """
    Some Docstring
    """
    return some_string

I've used standard builtin library AST - Abstract Syntax Trees for parsing the source code and astor – AST observe/rewrite to build it back into python executable source code

all in one GitHub Gist https://gist.github.com/phpdude/1ae6f19de213d66286c8183e9e3b9ec1

1
  • 1
    That's not directly answering the question, so I can't accept your answer, but that's a fantastic advice you just gave here! Thank you very much mate!
    – RobinFrcd
    Dec 10 '19 at 16:56

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