5

What is the most beautiful way to break a larger range into smaller non overlapping ranges?

range = 1..375

Desired Output:

1..100
101..200
201..300
301..375
5
  • Does range.begin always equal one? If not, and range = 150..375 do you want the decomposed ranges to be 150..249, 250..349, 350..375? Is the size of each decomposed range but the last 100, regardless of the size of the range? Dec 11 '19 at 6:36
  • No the range can start with any number and just goes up by whatever interval you want to specify.
    – Tom Rossi
    Dec 11 '19 at 21:26
  • I suggest you incorporate your comment in your question and then we delete the comments. Dec 11 '19 at 22:04
  • My understanding is ActiveSupport extends Ruby for methods common to Rails users. This may be an extension to add to ActiveSupport?
    – Tom Rossi
    Dec 12 '19 at 15:15
  • Good point @CarySwoveland
    – Tom Rossi
    Dec 12 '19 at 18:26
7

You can use #each_slice in combination with #map:

(1..375).each_slice(100).map { |a,*,b| (a..b) }     

#=> [1..100, 101..200, 201..300, 301..375]
8
  • Woah! Whats up with the splat in the mapped arguments? I don't even understand how thats working!
    – Tom Rossi
    Dec 11 '19 at 0:58
  • @TomRossi Basically you're splitting each element passed to the block in three parts where the first part is the first element (a), the third part is the last element (b) and all elements between the first and the last element are the second part which isn't really used here. You could also do something like this |a, *x, b|, in this case all the elements between a and b would be assigned to the x variable and you could of course use the x variable, which stores all the elements between a and b, inside the block.
    – Viktor
    Dec 11 '19 at 1:20
  • 1
    Instead of explaining how the code works in a comment, put the explanation into the answer. That makes it obvious for others looking for the solution. Dec 11 '19 at 6:57
  • 1
    This is a nice answer but it does have the disadvantage of requiring map to create and discard temporary arrays [2,3,...,99], [101,102,...,199] and so on. If there is any question that that is happening, note the following: n = 1_000_000_000_000; (1..n).each_slice(n/2).map { |a,*,b| (a..b) } #=> NoMemoryError (failed to allocate memory). Dec 11 '19 at 7:49
  • 1
    It is only a downside if the range is large. It does read nicely—better than my solution—and would not be a problem if the range were of modest size. Dec 11 '19 at 9:47
2

The following may not be the most elegant solution but it is designed to be relatively efficient, by avoiding the creation of temporary arrays.

def divide_range(range, sz)
  start = range.begin
  (range.size/sz).times.with_object([]) do |_,arr|
    arr << (start..start+sz-1)
    start += sz
  end.tap { |arr| (arr << (start..range.end)) if start < range.end }
end

divide_range(1..375, 100)
  #=> [1..100, 101..200, 201..300, 301..375] 
divide_range(1..400, 100)
  #=> [1..100, 101..200, 201..300, 301..400] 
divide_range(50..420, 50)
  #=> [50..99, 100..149, 150..199, 200..249, 250..299, 300..349,
  #    350..399, 400..420]
n = 1_000_000_000_000
divide_range(1..n, n/2)
  #=> [1..500000000000, 500000000001..1000000000000] 
2
  • 1
    Is this more efficient than the solution I started with?
    – Tom Rossi
    Dec 11 '19 at 21:25
  • Somewhat red-faced I must confess I did not read your code very carefully. My answer is only a slight variant of yours, certainly not better than yours. Your use of step, for one, is an improvement. Dec 11 '19 at 22:08
0

Currently, I'm using the step method, but I don't like having to check the top of the range and do calculations to avoid overlapping:

For example:

range = 1..375
interval = 100
range.step(interval).each do |start|
  stop = [range.last, start + (interval - 1)].min
  puts "#{start}..#{stop}"
end

I've taken this code and extended Range as well:

class Range
  def in_sub_ranges(interval)
    step(interval).each do |start|
      stop = [range.last, start + (interval - 1)].min
      yield(start..stop)
    end
  end
end

This allows me to do

range.in_sub_ranges(100) { |sub| puts sub }
2
  • Why not just range.step(interval).map {|i| i..[i+interval-1, range.last].min } ? Dec 12 '19 at 18:40
  • @ChrisHeald I like the use of Array#min!
    – Tom Rossi
    Dec 12 '19 at 19:12

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