11

I created a Github action that prints out some strings with the statement. The action triggers when I make commits on github.com, but does not trigger when I make commits locally and push them to the remote repository at github.com. Why is this?

Here is my action...

name: FeatureCI
on:
  push:
    branches:
      - '*'
jobs:
  build:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
    - uses: actions/checkout@v1
    - name: Run a one-line script
      run: echo "Only on featuer branches"
    - name: Run a multi-line script
      run: |
        echo "Only on featuer branches1"
        echo "Only on featuer branches2"
1
  • 1
    I don't experience the same thing you say. Also if you don't have a branch to filter, then there is no need for the '*'. Can you show an example repo that contains this action
    – smac89
    Commented Dec 11, 2019 at 3:31

8 Answers 8

10

Not a solution, but in my case it was just a delay on GitHub side.

After poking around with my workflow .yml file I found nothing wrong, and then GH suddenly started to run my pipelines.

8

I ran into a similar issue. In addition to Lando1n's suggestion, I would recommend making sure that your action file is on the desired feature branch. When you push from feature-branch, Github will only execute actions that are specified in the action file on feature-branch. See my similar answer here.

1
  • 1
    Thank you. I had the same issue and it also was because I setup my actions in the main branch via github in the browser and pushed via github desktop to a feature branch and was wondering why the actions aren't triggered. That was solved by merging the main branch with the .yaml files for the actions into the feature branch.
    – Franz
    Commented Feb 11, 2023 at 12:38
4

Try simplifying your 'on' trigger. Since you don't care which branch you are pushing to, it can be stated as so:

on: [push]
1
  • Nope does not work in my case Commented Oct 5, 2021 at 14:02
4

My issue was that when I test pipelines etc. I push Empty Commits, something like this:

git commit --allow-empty -m "Empty Commit"

That didn't trigger it, but when I made an actual change it would trigger.

1

For me it was because I had unresolved conflicts in my branch.

0

In my case my .github/ folder was not in the root folder. I just moved to the root path and it worked.

0

My issue was because I was editing this on a forked repository and Actions was automatically disabled, I just went to the Actions tab on GitHub, hit 'Enable Actions' and created a new commit and it worked!

0

Also it could be an outage on the side of GitHub; right now this is the case; check https://www.githubstatus.com/ for details.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.