4

I have one model class:

public class Person 
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

When I adding two list with this:

List<Person> people1 = new List<Person> {
    new Person() { Id = 1, Name = "Name1" },
    new Person() { Id = 2, Name = "Name2" },
    new Person() { Id = 3, Name = "Name3" },
};

List<Person> people2 = new List<Person> {
    new Person() { Id = 1, Name = "Name1" },
    new Person() { Id = 4, Name = "Name4" },
    new Person() { Id = 5, Name = "Name5" },
};

people1.AddRange(people2);

If person in people2 has the same id in person in people1, I don't want it added. How can I do that?

  • So, you consider two instances of Person to be the same based on Id, only? What should happen if the Name property differs? Should the one that's already in people1 be kept or should it be replaced by the other? – Fildor Dec 11 '19 at 8:57
  • In fact, there is no such possibility because I retrieve this data from the database. But if you write this possibility as an answer, maybe you can help others. – Qwe Qwe Dec 11 '19 at 8:59
  • Since it doesn't solve your problem, I would prefer someone (preferably the accepted answer) to include it in theirs. – Fildor Dec 11 '19 at 9:00
10

You can use LINQ for this fairly easily but inefficiently:

people1.AddRange(people2.Where(p2 => !people1.Any(p1 => p1.Id == p2.Id)));

Or you could create a set of IDs first:

HashSet<int> people1Ids = new HashSet<int>(people1.Select(p1 => p1.Id));
people1.AddRange(people2.Where(p2 => !people1Ids.Contains(p2.id));

The first approach is obviously simpler, but if your lists get large, it could become slow, because for every element in people2, it'll look through every element in people1.

The second approach will be significantly faster if people1 is large. If it's people2 that's large instead, you won't get much benefit. For example, if people1 only contains a couple of people, then looking in a hash set for an ID won't be much faster than looking through the list.

You could take an entirely different approach though. If you make your Person type implement IEquatable<Person> based on ID - or create an IEqualityComparer<Person> that does so, and if you don't so much need the existing list to be modified, so much as you need "the union of the two lists", and if you don't care about the order, and if all the entries in each list are unique or you don't mind duplicates being removed, you could just use:

// Specify the comparer as another argument if you need to.
// You could call ToList on the result if you need a list.
var union = people1.Union(people2);

(That's a lot of conditions for that solution, but they may well all be valid.)

|improve this answer|||||
  • I have doubt whether OP considered the situation from my comment to the question. (What if two Persons have same Id but different Name?) – Fildor Dec 11 '19 at 8:59
  • +1 for adding 2 solutions, not sure if the second one is performant, but it's easily readable and testable. – Glenn van Acker Dec 11 '19 at 8:59
  • 1
    @GlennvanAcker: The second one should perform much better than the first if people1 is large. – Jon Skeet Dec 11 '19 at 9:00
  • @Fildor: I've assumed the OP asked the question they wanted to ask. – Jon Skeet Dec 11 '19 at 9:01
  • @JonSkeet Fair enough, it was just a thought. But it seems that's impossible anyway. So nevermind. – Fildor Dec 11 '19 at 9:02
3

You can use the Union operator for this with a custom IEqualityComparer. This will create a new list which is a combination of the other 2. Implementing a customer IEqualityComparer gives you control over what constitutes the same record.

var allPeople = people1.Union(people2, new PersonComparer());

public class PersonComparer : IEqualityComparer<Person>
{
  public bool Equals(Person x, Person y)
  {
    // ommited null checks etc
    return x.Id == y.Id;
  }

  public int GetHashCode(Person obj)
  {
    // ommited null checks etc
    obj.Id.GetHashCode()
  }
}
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  • This will not work. Union uses the Hashcode directly to compare. So just implementing Equals will not do the trick. You will need to add a proper GetHashCode(Person obj) implementation for this to work. – Robin B Dec 11 '19 at 9:11
  • @RobinB correct - I ommited null checks, GetHashCode etc from the above for brevity. Will update for clarity. – Fermin Dec 11 '19 at 9:16
  • 1
    Thanks. I think this could have been a big trap for people seeing this later and just going for return obj.GetHashCode() and then asking themselves why their Equals() is never executed. – Robin B Dec 11 '19 at 9:21
2

Use this:

people1.AddRange(people2.Except(people1));

But you first need to Override Equal and GetHashCode in Person class:

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (!(obj is Person))
            return false;
        Person p = (Person)obj;
        return (p.Id == Id && p.Name == Name);
    }
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return String.Format("{0}|{1}", Id, Name).GetHashCode();
    }
}

Or you can use a a custom equality comparer and then use Distinct(new DistinctItemComparer()):

public class DistinctItemComparer : IEqualityComparer<Person>
{

    public bool Equals(Person x, Person y)
    {
        return x.Id == y.Id &&
            x.Name == y.Name;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(Person obj)
    {
        return obj.Id.GetHashCode() ^
            obj.Name.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Then use it like this:

people1.AddRange(people2.Except(people1, new DistinctItemComparer()));

If you just need to distinct based on Id you can excluse the Name from this two methods.

Based on this, The second approach seems better, as the Microsoft already suggested to Do not overload operator equals on reference types.

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1

Have you thought about using a Dictionary instead?

You can use the Id as a Key and it won't allow duplicate Keys to exist?

The following code is a way I've used before:

var dictionary = people1.ToDictionary(x => x.Id, x => x);

foreach(var person in people2)
{
    if(!dictionary.ContainsKey(item.Id))
    {
        dictionary.Add(item.Id, item);
    }
}

There may be a better way of doing it but this has worked for me.

This way when you add an item to the dictionary it won't let you add something with the same Id.

Also check out HashSets as they do a similar thing.

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  • The "better way of doing this" is a dictionary[item.ID] = item. Except it prefers the data from the inner-collection in case of duplicates. – Holger Dec 11 '19 at 9:07
1

I think good solution here is to use LINQ. Its quite simple and short code to write :

people1.AddRange(people2.Where(x => !people1.Any(y => x.Id == y.Id)));
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