113

error: RPC failed; curl 92 HTTP/2 stream 0 was not closed cleanly: PROTOCOL_ERROR (err 1)

I tried 'push' while writing 'git'. However, the following message does not solve the problem.

enter image description here

3
  • I got this error because I was trying git push origin branch_name and there was no remote branch corresponding to the local branch I'm trying to push.
    – user15813867
    Sep 27 '21 at 14:04
  • Just try a better internet network. Oct 25 '21 at 6:12
  • Note: you can also get the almost same error message in completely different context. In my case, it was not related to git. The api response status code was 204, but there was data in response body which made content-length check fail. Jan 18 at 10:30

28 Answers 28

135

You can force git using http version 1.1

git config --global http.version HTTP/1.1

https://gist.github.com/daofresh/0a95772d582cafb202142ff7871da2fc

10
  • 15
    Why should one downgrade the HTTP version? eventually, we will be moving on to HTTP2. Apr 3 '20 at 21:04
  • 5
    This fixed the issue on MacOSX, git config http.postBuffer 524288000 can not fix this issue. But @AbhishekSharma's question is good, why should we downgrade the HTTP version.
    – Aisuko
    May 13 '20 at 5:35
  • 1
    This version command fixed my issue. I tried the post buffer approach and also other options like adding user name in the git URL which didn't help me either.
    – Santosh
    Jun 3 '20 at 20:02
  • In reply to questions about downgrading to HTTP/1.1, the error message posted by OP points to an issue with HTTP/2; it is likely that something beyond OP's control (a proxy, the GIT server, etc.) does not work well with HTTP/2. Until that's fixed, downgrading to HTTP/1.1 is a valid workaround.
    – quiram
    Sep 10 '20 at 9:23
  • 9
    Something else to mention: you may not want to include the --global flag, unless you always work with the same central server. If you work with multiple servers (e.g. GitHub, BitBucket, GitLab, etc.), then you may want to set this config in a repo-by-repo basis.
    – quiram
    Sep 10 '20 at 9:26
61

You might be pushing data larger than the postBuffer size.

You can try increasing post buffer size using

git config --global http.postBuffer 157286400

For reference: https://confluence.atlassian.com/bitbucketserverkb/git-push-fails-fatal-the-remote-end-hung-up-unexpectedly-779171796.html

9
  • Thank you for the valuable reference but not working for me getting same error frequently. May 12 '21 at 10:09
  • 1
    If you have not set it globally, you will experience this in every git repo and config locally for every repo. Also check if you are uploading a really big file to the repo then the value of buffer size should be set accordingly May 17 '21 at 6:53
  • I tried with global as well as local but not working for me and actually I'm not uploading that much of big files also. I read reference provided by you. May 18 '21 at 4:45
  • 1
    It was nice reference and after reading and trying that I asked separate question May 18 '21 at 4:46
  • 1
    For future references, if the solution is not working you can find a possible explanation here May 18 '21 at 5:24
45

Simple solution (reverts to http 2 after) :

git config --global http.version HTTP/1.1
git push 
git config --global http.version HTTP/2
4
  • 2
    Why is recomended to return http/2?
    – AntoCode
    Feb 2 '21 at 22:13
  • @AntoCode, it's because it was originally in version http/2. Other pipelines that might be dependant on v2 might fail if the http version remains at 1.1 Aug 22 '21 at 17:02
  • 2
    Why not just run git config http.version HTTP/1.1 for that repository? That way you don't need to set it back to HTTP/2 afterwards. Since that change will only apply to the current git repository.
    – YJH16120
    Sep 25 '21 at 14:03
  • Nice idea @Xys. However, it's possible that HTTP/2 is a default, not a set configuration name. This is the case when git config --global http.version returns nothing. In that case, the commands should be git config --global http.version HTTP/1.1; git push; git config --global --unset http.version A bash script that does the right thing in either case is left as an exercise for the reader!
    – Arthur
    Dec 23 '21 at 21:16
39

XCode 11.4.1

Increasing the git buffer size worked for me

git config --global http.postBuffer 524288000
3
  • 1
    whats the difference between using the --global tag and not?
    – benmneb
    Jul 21 '21 at 12:30
  • 1
    --global tag makes it so that all git repositories you have will have a postBuffer of that amount. Omitting global means only that git repo will have a postBuffer of 524288000
    – YJH16120
    Sep 25 '21 at 14:02
  • 1
    this did it for me on raspberry pi over WLAN
    – Mathy
    Oct 17 '21 at 11:52
32

Working Solution:

First change HTTP version to 1.1 and then push and once done change back to HTTP2

$ git config --global http.version HTTP/1.1
After it push was ok and I have changed HTTP version to 2 again:
$ git config --global http.version HTTP/2
20
git config http.postBuffer 524288000

This is the latest, should solve your issue

1
  • 1
    This is really a live saver, anytime anyday
    – Godstime
    Sep 29 '21 at 10:42
13

I followed most of the answers but not solved my problem.

In my case, the answer is very simple

I encountered this error when pushing GIT through an ADSL Broadband Wi-Fi network with low signal strength, low stability, and low speed.

Then, I was able to push it very successfully when I pushed it into the GIT through a Fibre Broadband Wi-Fi network with greater signal strength, greater stability, and higher speed.

Error:

Push failed Enumerating objects: 44, done. Delta compression using up to 12 threads RPC failed; curl 92 HTTP/2 stream 0 was not closed cleanly: CANCEL (err 8) the remote end hung up unexpectedly Total 30 (delta 18), reused 0 (delta 0) the remote hung up unexpectedly

enter image description here

1
  • 6
    It would be a lot more helpful to people using search engines if you could post that error as text in your question instead of an image. Considering that this error is different than the one in the question, people getting this error might still arrive and find your answer helpful, but they can't do it if it's an image
    – Tomerikoo
    Oct 25 '21 at 6:22
7

It's was not working for me. But worked after downgrading version of HTTP from 2 to 1.1:

$ git config --global http.version HTTP/1.1

After this change, pushing was successful and I have changed HTTP version to 2 again:

$ git config --global http.version HTTP/2
1
  • 1
    it is also possible to make it not global but in project specific git config http.version HTTP/1.1 Oct 23 '21 at 18:49
5

In most cases git config http.postBuffer 524288000 should work.

In my case, I was pushing a large number of changes (I changed a lot of packages thus there were many lines updated) in my yarn.lock/package-lock.json file. Since it is usually not required, removing it made the error go away. So you can try this too if you are working with Javascript

3

It sounds like either the remote server you're using or some middlebox (e.g., a proxy) is not speaking the HTTP/2 protocol correctly. You can either fix that by asking the owner of that remote server or middlebox to fix their server, or you can force the use of HTTP/1.1.

If you want to force the use of HTTP/1.1, you can set the http.version configuration option to HTTP/1.1. That can also be set on a per-URL basis as described in the http.<url>.* section in the git-config manual page.

4
  • If a normal file has no 'push' error, if I 'push' the image file, an error occurs. Dec 16 '19 at 4:35
  • It may be that whatever network issue, remote server, or middlebox is there is causing problems with certain content, but this is definitely a network-related problem.
    – bk2204
    Dec 16 '19 at 23:18
  • In my case the remote server is github.com. You would think they had their stuff together. I never had to change my http on my other repository. This one kept giving me 'fatal: the remote end hung up unexpectedly', but after doing the change to http/2, my push succeeded.
    – TARKUS
    Feb 25 '21 at 19:54
  • 1
    GitHub supports both and both should work without problems (and do for millions of people a day). It is likely that there is something else, such as a non-default antivirus or firewall, a proxy server, or TLS MITM device, all of which are known to cause problems with Git in general.
    – bk2204
    Feb 25 '21 at 23:43
3

For my case with the bitbucket behind nginx, disabling proxy request buffering was the answer:

server {
    listen 443 ssl http2 default_server;
    ...
    proxy_request_buffering off;

    # These are also relevant:
    proxy_read_timeout      600;
    client_max_body_size    0;
3

In most cases, increasing the buffer size will work.

git config http.postBuffer 524288000

It worked for me.

Use of

git config --global http.version HTTP/1.1

should be kept as a last option.

Using a gitbash terminal on a windows machine (if this info helps you in any way).

2

In my case I had to reset the origin to ssh instead of http/https:

git remote set-url origin git@your-git.com

To check your origins you can use:

git remote -v
1

for me helped just this

server {
    listen 443 ssl http2 default_server;
    ...
    location / {
         ...
         proxy_request_buffering off;
         ...
    }
}
1

To me this is worked:

git checkout --orphan newBranch
git add -A  # Add all files and commit them
git commit -am "Clean Repo"
git branch -D master  # Deletes the master branch
git branch -m master  # Rename the current branch to master
git push -f origin master  # Force push master branch to github

Thanks to: https://panjeh.medium.com/cleaning-up-git-github-repository-without-deleting-git-directory-c86b7415b51b

However my issue was slighty different, with a "packages already packed" info with the RPC::HTTP/2 stream not closed cleanly message

0

For me this was caused by a forgotten return 444; in my nginx config. The connection termination caused this misleading error message under HTTP 2.0

0

I went through a similar situation. I tried;

git config --global http.version HTTP/1.1  
git config --global http.postBuffer 157286400
git config --global http.postBuffer 524288000

even,

git config --global core.compression 0  

failed example

but, nothing changed. I had two folders with this error. one with 10MB size and one with 65MB.

finally. I tried with a Fibre connection.

worked proof

So yeah. try with a different, higher speed connection. probably it will work.

Good Luck!

0

Following the advice of some people here:

git config http.postBuffer 524288000
git push

Results to an error:

remote: error: See http://git.io/iEPt8g for more information.
remote: error: File public/img/layout/group-photo.psd is 184.91 MB; this exceeds GitHub's file size limit of 100.00 MB
remote: error: GH001: Large files detected. You may want to try Git Large File Storage - https://git-lfs.github.com.

So this is more of a file issue rather than a network connectivity issue in my case. Move the large file out of the project and proceed to commit and push the whole thing.

0

Don't forget to add an SSH key to your Github account. That was causing the error for me.

0

Ironically, for me it turned out to be bad internet connection - I tried everything above, nothing worked, then I did a speed test and found I had 100+Mb download but only 0.x Mb upload at the time, due to some wifi issues. After I fixed it the problem disappeared.

0

For me I thought that was my internet so I tried with a better internet but the error persists. Until I have found this solution:

Basicaly I had to copy into another branch the files and delete the other and rename the current one. To clean the repo.

git checkout --orphan newBranch
git add -A  # Add all files and commit them
git commit -am "Clean Repo"
git branch -D master  # Deletes the master branch
git branch -m master  # Rename the current branch to master
git push -f origin master  # Force push master branch to github
1
  • The point is with this you will lose all previous commits from the branch master Dec 29 '21 at 12:18
0

I have tried most of the answers but it still not work for me. It turns out that I have some file that > 100 MB. So I removed those file and it works.

0

I live rurally and have mobile broadband, that is based on a very low 4g signal, I get two bars of signal on a good day. I was pushing several files amounting to only 39mb, which is well below github's max file size, I have also pushed much bigger commits on the same repo from this location, so it did not make sense that the file size caused the problems for me. I tried everything mentioned here, changing to HTTP1, and changing postbuffer did not help.

After several hours of head scratching, I restarted my router and was able to push the commit to github.

Hopefully this can help someone out there that also has terrible a internet connection.

-1

If your error is related to trying to push large file (I had that error message in my case), run:

git filter-branch -f --index-filter 'git rm --cached --ignore-unmatch {your full path file name}'

https://medium.com/@marcosantonocito/fixing-the-gh001-large-files-detected-you-may-want-to-try-git-large-file-storage-43336b983272

-1

Also check if you maybe using a VPN, I got the error while using VPN, I decided to turn my VPN off and try again, then it Worked

-1

For me this query works : git push --set-upstream origin main

1
  • This does not answer the question Dec 27 '21 at 7:31
-2

The only issue in this case is Bad Internet Connection and nothing else. I fixed it by switching to better internet connection. enter image description here

-5

In my case, I changed my password on the server (Gitlab) but not in my local git credentials.

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