8

Is it possible to use the return value of a function instead of a specific value as optional parameter in a function? For example instead of:

public void ExampleMethod(int a, int b, int c=10)
{
}

I want something like

private int ChangeC(int a, int b)
{
    return a+b;
}

public void ExampleMethod(int a, int b, int c=ChangeC(a,b))
{
}
3
  • 4
    No, because the parameters for that method do not exist in that context. You could just use it on the first line of your method: c = c ?? ChangeC(a,b) Dec 11, 2019 at 12:22
  • Please give an example in pseudo code. It is a bit unclear what you want to achieve.
    – Rob
    Dec 11, 2019 at 12:23
  • You could have two overloads of the method - one with three parameters & one with two that calls the first using the results of the function call as the third parameter
    – PaulF
    Dec 11, 2019 at 12:25

3 Answers 3

16

No this is not possible. For a parameter to be optional the value must be a compile time constant. You can however overload the method like so:

private int ChangeC(int a, int b)
{
    return a + b;
}

public void ExampleMethod(int a, int b, int c) {}

public void ExampleMethod(int a, int b)
{
    ExampleMethod(a, b, ChangeC(a, b));
}

This way you don't have to deal with nullable value types

8

One of the ways:

private int ChangeC(int a, int b)
{
    return a+b; 
} 

public void ExampleMethod(int a, int b, int? c=null)
{
    c = c ?? ChangeC(a,b);
}
3

Is it possible to use the return value of a function instead of a specific value as optional parameter in a function?

No. It is not possible. The C# programming guide on Optional Arguments says:

A default value must be one of the following types of expressions:

  • a constant expression;

  • an expression of the form new ValType(), where ValType is a value type, such as an enum or a struct;

  • an expression of the form default(ValType), where ValType is a value type.

See other answers for alternative solutions.

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