12
#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <functional>

struct PacketFrom
{
    typedef std::unique_ptr<PacketFrom> SPtr;
};

template<class P> 
class R{
    public:
    void queue_read(P *t)
    {
        doSomething([t = typename PacketFrom::SPtr(t)](){test(std::move(t));});
    }

    void doSomething(std::function<void()> f) {

    }

    void test(PacketFrom::SPtr p) {

    }
};

int main()
{
    R<PacketFrom> r;

    return 0;
}

How can this code work if the lambda function is being passed by copy? The lambda owns a unique_ptr which cannot be copied. I thought it was simply not capturing the unique_ptr so I added test() just to be sure it was capturing. However the code compiles fine.

  • 2
    Nothing is copied here. f is move-constructed from the lambda expression in queue_read. But it still shouldn't work because in doSomething you no longer know that f can't be copied. – Max Langhof Dec 11 '19 at 17:09
  • 4
    clang errors; g++ and MSVC compile: godbolt.org/z/Nuv-hn suggest [language-lawyer] tag – Richard Critten Dec 11 '19 at 17:09
  • 1
    Always keep in mind that C++ has this unique failure mode where asking the compiler "is this a valid program" has false positives.. – Jesper Juhl Dec 11 '19 at 17:50
  • (t)](){test(std::move(t));}); Is it normal to have so many ()()({][][}}[[]]{]]())(( without spaces in C++? – Alexander - Reinstate Monica Dec 12 '19 at 2:26
16

This code doesn't actually "work" in that sense. It compiles, but only because you don't ever call queue_read.

If you try to use it (which forces the compiler to actually instantiate the R<P>::queue_read, which it doesn't have to do until that point) then you get an error from every compiler:

template<class P> 
class R{
    public:
    void queue_read(P *t)
    {
        doSomething([this, t = std::unique_ptr<P>(t)]() { test(std::move(t)); });
    }

    void doSomething(std::function<void()> f) {
        (void)f;
    }

    void test(std::unique_ptr<P> p) {
        (void)p;
    }
};

int main()
{
    R<int> r;
    r.queue_read(new int(1));

    return 0;
}

clang 9.0:

error: call to deleted constructor of 'std::unique_ptr<int>'
    doSomething([this, t = std::unique_ptr<P>(t)]() { test(std::move(t)); });

gcc 9.2:

error: use of deleted function 'std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Dp>::unique_ptr(const std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Dp>&) [with _Tp = int; _Dp = std::default_delete<int>]'
11 |         doSomething([this, t = std::unique_ptr<P>(t)]() { test(std::move(t)); });

MSVC 19.22:

error C2280: 'std::unique_ptr<P,std::default_delete<_Ty>>::unique_ptr(const std::unique_ptr<_Ty,std::default_delete<_Ty>> &)': attempting to reference a deleted function

https://godbolt.org/z/KmjVJB (thanks Richard!)

Again, the key here is that the compiler didn't actually compile the code of queue_read because there was no need. The function is implicitly inline by virtue of being defined within the class body. Instantiating R<P> for some P causes only the declarations, but not the definitions of its member functions to be instantiated. Only once you actually call queue_read does the compiler have to complain.

This is a good thing by the way. You can use std::vector<MoveOnlyType> and do everything that doesn't require copying, even though some of the std::vector member functions require a copyable type. But as long as you never use the latter functions, everything is fine. If the compiler always instantiated all the member function definitions and reported errors in those (even if never used) it would be way more cumbersome.

  • github.com/OpenVPN/openvpn3/blob/… do you have any idea of why the same code works here? I've written my question from here, but it shouldn't work. However it works – Guerlando OCs Dec 11 '19 at 17:29
  • 1
    @GuerlandoOCs If you give me links to the classes TunIO is instantiated with I can take a look, but I don't have the time to dig for some instantiation and the definitions of the classes used as template parameters of TunIO in there myself. – Max Langhof Dec 11 '19 at 17:32
  • 2
    @GuerlandoOCs async_read_some doesn’t accept a std::function but a HANDLER&&, where HANDLER is a template type. In other words, nothing to see here: the lambda is moved into the function. – Konrad Rudolph Dec 11 '19 at 17:32
  • @GuerlandoOCs There is no same code there. I see neither std::unique_ptr nor std::function. – eerorika Dec 11 '19 at 17:35
  • 1
    @GuerlandoOCs No. Each lambda has a unique, un-nameable type. That's the type that the template parameter will have. Think of it as struct __SOME_HASH__ { auto operator()(/* your arguments */) { /* your code */ }; /* your captures */ }; - on a high level. If std::function didn't exist, lambdas would work exactly like they do right now (but accepting a capturing lambda into a non-templated method would require essentially a std::function reimplementation). Lambdas are not a std::function and do not "decay" to them automatically (but can be converted to them seamlessly). – Max Langhof Dec 11 '19 at 18:12
10

How can std::function be copied if it captures an unique_ptr?

A std::function doesn't capture anything.

A lambda that captures a non-copyable object such as std::unique_ptr is itself non-copyable. Such lambda doesn't satisfy, nor does any other non-copyable function object type satisfy the requirements of std::function which requires the functor to be copyable. Standard rule (from latest draft):

[func.wrap.func.con]

template<class F> function(F f);

Requires: F shall be Cpp17CopyConstructible.


However the code compiles fine.

This is typical when the ill-formed function is an unused function of a template. It should fail to compile if you attempt to call the function.

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