40

The JSON response from my ASP.NET Core 3.1 API controller is missing properties. This happens when a property uses a derived type; any properties defined in the derived type but not in the base/interface will not be serialized to JSON. It seems there is some lack of support for polymorphism in the response, as if serialization is based on a property's defined type instead of its runtime type. How can I change this behavior to ensure that all public properties are included in the JSON response?

Example:

My .NET Core Web API Controller returns this object that has a property with an interface type.

    // controller returns this object
    public class Result
    {
        public IResultProperty ResultProperty { get; set; }   // property uses an interface type
    }

    public interface IResultProperty
    { }

Here is a derived type that defines a new public property named Value.

    public class StringResultProperty : IResultProperty
    {
        public string Value { get; set; }
    }

If I return the derived type from my controller like this:

    return new MainResult {
        ResultProperty = new StringResultProperty { Value = "Hi there!" }
    };

then the actual response includes an empty object (the Value property is missing):

enter image description here

I want the response to be:

    {
        "ResultProperty": { "Value": "Hi there!" }
    }

8 Answers 8

29

While the other answers are good and solves the problem, if all you want is the general behavior to be like pre netcore3, you can use the Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.NewtonsoftJson NuGet package and in Startup.cs do:

services.AddControllers().AddNewtonsoftJson()

More info here. This way, you don't need to create any extra json-converters.

2
21

I ended up creating a custom JsonConverter (System.Text.Json.Serialization namespace) which forces JsonSerializer to serialize to the object's runtime type. See the Solution section below. It's lengthy but it works well and does not require me to sacrifice object oriented principles in my API's design. (If you need something quicker and can use Newtonsoft then check out the top voted answer instead.)

Some background: Microsoft has a System.Text.Json serialization guide with a section titled Serialize properties of derived classes with good information relevant to my question. In particular it explains why properties of derived types are not serialized:

This behavior is intended to help prevent accidental exposure of data in a derived runtime-created type.

If that is not a concern for you then the behavior can be overridden in the call to JsonSerializer.Serialize by either explicitly specifying the derived type or by specifying object, for example:

    // by specifying the derived type
    jsonString = JsonSerializer.Serialize(objToSerialize, objToSerialize.GetType(), serializeOptions);
    
    // or specifying 'object' works too
    jsonString = JsonSerializer.Serialize<object>(objToSerialize, serializeOptions);

To accomplish this with ASP.NET Core you need to hook into the serialization process. I did this with a custom JsonConverter that calls JsonSerializer.Serialize one of the ways shown above. I also implemented support for deserialization which, while not explicitly asked for in the original question, is almost always needed anyway. (Oddly, supporting only serialization and not deserialization proved to be tricky anyway.)

Solution

I created a base class, DerivedTypeJsonConverter, which contains all of the serialization & deserialization logic. For each of your base types, you would create a corresponding converter class for it that derives from DerivedTypeJsonConverter. This is explained in the numbered directions below.

This solution follows the "type name handling" convention from Json.NET which introduces support for polymorphism to JSON. It works by including an additional $type property in the derived type's JSON (ex: "$type":"StringResultProperty") that tells the converter what the object's true type is. (One difference: in Json.NET, $type's value is a fully qualified type + assembly name, whereas my $type is a custom string which helps future-proof against namespace/assembly/class name changes.) API callers are expected to include $type properties in their JSON requests for derived types. The serialization logic solves my original problem by ensuring that all of the object's public properties are serialized, and for consistency the $type property is also serialized.

Directions:

1) Copy the DerivedTypeJsonConverter class below into your project.

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Dynamic;
    using System.IO;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Reflection;
    using System.Text;
    using System.Text.Json;
    using System.Text.Json.Serialization;

    public abstract class DerivedTypeJsonConverter<TBase> : JsonConverter<TBase>
    {
        protected abstract string TypeToName(Type type);
    
        protected abstract Type NameToType(string typeName);
    

        private const string TypePropertyName = "$type";
    

        public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
        {
            return typeof(TBase) == objectType;
        }
    
    
        public override TBase Read(ref Utf8JsonReader reader, Type typeToConvert, JsonSerializerOptions options)
        {
            // get the $type value by parsing the JSON string into a JsonDocument
            JsonDocument jsonDocument = JsonDocument.ParseValue(ref reader);
            jsonDocument.RootElement.TryGetProperty(TypePropertyName, out JsonElement typeNameElement);
            string typeName = (typeNameElement.ValueKind == JsonValueKind.String) ? typeNameElement.GetString() : null;
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(typeName)) throw new InvalidOperationException($"Missing or invalid value for {TypePropertyName} (base type {typeof(TBase).FullName}).");
    
            // get the JSON text that was read by the JsonDocument
            string json;
            using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
            using (var writer = new Utf8JsonWriter(stream, new JsonWriterOptions { Encoder = options.Encoder })) {
                jsonDocument.WriteTo(writer);
                writer.Flush();
                json = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(stream.ToArray());
            }
    
            // deserialize the JSON to the type specified by $type
            try {
                return (TBase)JsonSerializer.Deserialize(json, NameToType(typeName), options);
            }
            catch (Exception ex) {
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Invalid JSON in request.", ex);
            }
        }
    

        public override void Write(Utf8JsonWriter writer, TBase value, JsonSerializerOptions options)
        {
            // create an ExpandoObject from the value to serialize so we can dynamically add a $type property to it
            ExpandoObject expando = ToExpandoObject(value);
            expando.TryAdd(TypePropertyName, TypeToName(value.GetType()));
    
            // serialize the expando
            JsonSerializer.Serialize(writer, expando, options);
        }
    

        private static ExpandoObject ToExpandoObject(object obj)
        {
            var expando = new ExpandoObject();
            if (obj != null) {
                // copy all public properties
                foreach (PropertyInfo property in obj.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance).Where(p => p.CanRead)) {
                    expando.TryAdd(property.Name, property.GetValue(obj));
                }
            }
    
            return expando;
        }
    }

2) For each of your base types, create a class that derives from DerivedTypeJsonConverter. Implement the 2 abstract methods which are for mapping $type strings to actual types. Here is an example for my IResultProperty interface that you can follow.

    public class ResultPropertyJsonConverter : DerivedTypeJsonConverter<IResultProperty>
    {
        protected override Type NameToType(string typeName)
        {
            return typeName switch
            {
                // map string values to types
                nameof(StringResultProperty) => typeof(StringResultProperty)

                // TODO: Create a case for each derived type
            };
        }
    
        protected override string TypeToName(Type type)
        {
            // map types to string values
            if (type == typeof(StringResultProperty)) return nameof(StringResultProperty);

            // TODO: Create a condition for each derived type
        }
    }

3) Register the converters in Startup.cs.

    services.AddControllers()
        .AddJsonOptions(options => {
            options.JsonSerializerOptions.Converters.Add(new ResultPropertyJsonConverter());

            // TODO: Add each converter
        });

4) In requests to the API, objects of derived types will need to include a $type property. Example JSON: { "Value":"Hi!", "$type":"StringResultProperty" }

Full gist here

6
  • 2
    Upvoted, was struggling with this as well. Also I'm pretty sure you know this but another option is to use Newtonsoft.Json, which provides support for derived types out of the box.
    – OnoSendai
    Jan 6, 2020 at 21:06
  • 4
    This is a pretty disappointing caveat of the System.Text.Json. Good old Newtonsoft sounds a lot easier
    – JamesFaix
    Jan 13, 2020 at 20:57
  • I've struggling with the same problem but for some reason only when I deploy my application in a Docker Container. Locally it works fine. I use net core 3.1.3 and my application targets netcoreapp3.1. Does anybody know why? Is it possible to check during runtime which serializer is used?
    – chuchu42
    Jul 9, 2020 at 13:52
  • 2
    Why don't they simply provide a setting for this?
    – PhillipM
    Apr 7, 2021 at 14:07
  • 2
14

The documentation shows how to serialize as the derived class when calling the serializer directly. The same technique can also be used in a custom converter that we then can tag our classes with.

First, create a custom converter

public class AsRuntimeTypeConverter<T> : JsonConverter<T>
{
    public override T Read(ref Utf8JsonReader reader, Type typeToConvert, JsonSerializerOptions options)
    {
        return JsonSerializer.Deserialize<T>(ref reader, options);
    }

    public override void Write(Utf8JsonWriter writer, T value, JsonSerializerOptions options)
    {
        JsonSerializer.Serialize(writer, value, value?.GetType() ?? typeof(object), options);
    }
}

Then mark the relevant classes to be used with the new converter

[JsonConverter(typeof(AsRuntimeTypeConverter<MyBaseClass>))]
public class MyBaseClass
{
   ...

Alternately, the converter can be registered in startup.cs instead

services
  .AddControllers(options =>
     .AddJsonOptions(options =>
            {
                options.JsonSerializerOptions.Converters.Add(new AsRuntimeTypeConverter<MyBaseClass>());
            }));
3
  • 2
    Certainly looks cleaner, but caused a StackOverflowException in my application when serializing an instance of MyBaseClass because the writer.Write method is called which steps back into the AsRuntimeTypeConverter<T> type.
    – ColinM
    Nov 13, 2020 at 17:24
  • Doesn't that only work if I know in advance (i.e. at compile time) to which derived type I want to deserialize the received JSON string?
    – Frank
    Jun 13, 2021 at 15:17
  • @Frank this is serialization of the controller response, not deserialization of the request data. You do have a similar issue if you want to allow for derived types as input as well but the solution would be very different.
    – nimatt
    Jun 14, 2021 at 10:54
2

I had a similar issue, where I was returning an enumerable of type TAnimal (but the object instances were of derived types such as Dog, Cat, etc.):

[HttpGet]
public IEnumerable<TAnimal> GetAnimals()
{
    IEnumerable<TAnimal> list = GetListOfAnimals();
    return list;
}

This only included properties defined in TAnimal.

However, in ASP .NET Core 3.1 at least, I found that I could just cast the object instances to object, and the JSON serializer then included all the properties from the derived classes:

[HttpGet]
public IEnumerable<object> GetAnimals()
{
    IEnumerable<TAnimal> list = GetListOfAnimals();
    return list.Select(a => (object)a);
}

(Note that the signature of the GetAnimals method must also changed, but that doesn't usually matter much in a web API context). If you need to provide type information for Swagger or whatever, you can annotate the method:

[HttpGet]
[Produces(MediaTypeNames.Application.Json, Type = typeof(TAnimal[]))]
public IEnumerable<object> GetAnimals()
{
    ...
}

Casting to object is a simple solution if you only have a 1-layer-deep object hierarchy to worry about.

1
  • this worked for me!! thanks so much for posting it, i had the same very simple scenario and this approach was so quick and easy Jul 8 at 13:05
1

This is the expected result. You're upcasting when you do that, so what will be serialized is the upcasted object, not the actual derived type. If you need stuff from the derived type, then that has to be the type of the property. You may want to use generics for this reason. In other words:

public class Result<TResultProperty>
    where TResultProperty : IResultProperty
{
    public TResultProperty ResultProperty { get; set; }   // property uses an interface type
}

Then:

return new Result<StringResultProperty> {
    ResultProperty = new StringResultProperty { Value = "Hi there!" }  
};
1

I solved it by writing this extension:

public static class JsonSerializationExtensions
{
    public static string ToJson<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable, bool includeDerivedTypesProperties = true)
            where T : class
    {
        var jsonOptions = new JsonSerializerOptions()
        {
            PropertyNamingPolicy = JsonNamingPolicy.CamelCase
        };

        if (includeDerivedTypeProperties)
        {
            var collection = enumerable.Select(e => e as object).ToList();
            return JsonSerializer.Serialize<object>(collection, jsonOptions);
        }
        else
        {
            return JsonSerializer.Serialize(enumerable, jsonOptions);
        }
    }
}
0

I was also struggling with this in a .NET Core 3.1 API, where I wanted the result to include $type attribute.

As suggested, install the correct package and then 'AddNewtonsoftJson'.

I wanted the $type field to be added to show the derived type handling, to get that

services.AddControllers().AddNewtonsoftJson(options => 
{ 
    options.SerializerSettings.TypeNameHandling = Newtonsoft.Json.TypeNameHandling.All;
});
0

Not knocking Newtonsoft, but I found an easier way to resolve this with the built handlers.

    [OperationContract]
    [WebInvoke(Method = "GET", UriTemplate = "/emps", BodyStyle = WebMessageBodyStyle.Wrapped, RequestFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json, ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json)]
    List<emp> GetEmps();

//[DataContract(Namespace = "foo")] <<< comment/removed this line
public class emp
{
    public string userId { get; set; }
    public string firstName { get; set; }
}
public class dept
{
    public string deptId{ get; set; }
    public string deptName{ get; set; }
}

In my case dept objects where working fine, but emp ones were not - they came across as empty.

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