1

Is it possible to remove a node from a tree in Rascal? Take the ColoredTree for an example.

How do you write a function deleteNode? For example:

public ColoredTree deleteNode(ColoredTree t){
   return visit(t) {
     case red(l, r) => someProperty ? DELETE : DO NOTHING;   
   };
}
1

That is interesting.

See the definition of ColoredTree in the example is this:

data ColoredTree = leaf(int N)      
                 | red(ColoredTree left, ColoredTree right) 
                 | black(ColoredTree left, ColoredTree right);

Similar to a Java enum the type ColoredTree can be one of 3 things: a leaf, a red or a black constructor. There is no alternative for "nothing" and Rascal has no "null" (on purpose! see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Hoare)

If you want to remove something, it must be in a context where a correct value is left over, such as elements in a list, a set or a map. Or you might want to introduce your own special "null" value.

Here is an example. We add an alternative to ColoredTree to represent nothingness:

data ColoredTree = choppedTheBranch();

and now we can rewrite the tree like you proposed:

ColoredTree deleteNode(ColoredTree t){
   return visit(t) {
     case t:red(l, r) => someProperty ? choppedTheBranch() : t;   
   };
}

Although this is more idiomatically written as:

ColoredTree deleteNode(ColoredTree t){
   return visit(t) {
     case t:red(l, r) => choppedTheBranch() when someProperty;
   };
}

A different approach is to use containers such as lists. Here I changed red and black nodes to have a list of children rather than only a left and right child:

data ColoredTree = leaf(int N)      
                 | red(list[ColoredTree] children) 
                 | black(list[ColoredTree] children);

This allows us to remove elements from these lists without destroying the type-correctness of the trees. For example:

ColoredTree deleteNode(ColoredTree t){
   return visit(t) {
     case list[ColoredTree] children => [c | c <- children, !someProperty(c)]
   };
}

I usually make sure to match a context around a list, to avoid accidental matches, like so:

ColoredTree deleteNode(ColoredTree t){
   return visit(t) {
     case red(children) => red([c | c <- children, !someProperty(c)])
     case black(children) => black([c | c <- children, !someProperty(c)])
   };

This example makes it look like a code clone, but in AST analysis often the fact that two nodes require the same treatment is best made explicit/declarative, and more often each node requires a different treatment.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.