0

This is the query:

EXPLAIN (analyze, BUFFERS, SETTINGS)
SELECT
    operation.id
FROM
    operation
RIGHT JOIN(
    SELECT uid, did FROM (
            SELECT uid, did FROM operation where id = 993754
        ) t
    ) parts ON (operation.uid = parts.uid AND operation.did = parts.did)

and EXPLAIN info:

Nested Loop Left Join  (cost=0.85..29695.77 rows=100 width=8) (actual time=13.709..13.711 rows=1 loops=1)
  Buffers: shared hit=4905
  ->  Unique  (cost=0.42..8.45 rows=1 width=16) (actual time=0.011..0.013 rows=1 loops=1)
        Buffers: shared hit=5
        ->  Index Only Scan using oi on operation operation_1  (cost=0.42..8.44 rows=1 width=16) (actual time=0.011..0.011 rows=1 loops=1)
              Index Cond: (id = 993754)
              Heap Fetches: 1
              Buffers: shared hit=5
  ->  Index Only Scan using oi on operation  (cost=0.42..29686.32 rows=100 width=24) (actual time=13.695..13.696 rows=1 loops=1)
        Index Cond: ((uid = operation_1.uid) AND (did = operation_1.did))
        Heap Fetches: 1
        Buffers: shared hit=4900
Settings: max_parallel_workers_per_gather = '4', min_parallel_index_scan_size = '0', min_parallel_table_scan_size = '0', parallel_setup_cost = '0', parallel_tuple_cost = '0', work_mem = '256MB'
Planning Time: 0.084 ms
Execution Time: 13.728 ms

Why does Nested Loop cost more and more time than sum of childs cost? What can I do for that? The Execution Time should less than 1 ms right?


update:

Nested Loop Left Join  (cost=5.88..400.63 rows=101 width=8) (actual time=0.012..0.012 rows=1 loops=1)
  Buffers: shared hit=8
  ->  Index Scan using oi on operation operation_1  (cost=0.42..8.44 rows=1 width=16) (actual time=0.005..0.005 rows=1 loops=1)
        Index Cond: (id = 993754)
        Buffers: shared hit=4
  ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on operation  (cost=5.45..391.19 rows=100 width=24) (actual time=0.004..0.005 rows=1 loops=1)
        Recheck Cond: ((uid = operation_1.uid) AND (did = operation_1.did))
        Heap Blocks: exact=1
        Buffers: shared hit=4
        ->  Bitmap Index Scan on ou  (cost=0.00..5.42 rows=100 width=0) (actual time=0.003..0.003 rows=1 loops=1)
              Index Cond: ((uid = operation_1.uid) AND (did = operation_1.did))
              Buffers: shared hit=3
Settings: max_parallel_workers_per_gather = '4', min_parallel_index_scan_size = '0', min_parallel_table_scan_size = '0', parallel_setup_cost = '0', parallel_tuple_cost = '0', work_mem = '256MB'
Planning Time: 0.127 ms
Execution Time: 0.028 ms

Thanks all of you, when I split the index to btree(id) and btree(uid, did), everything's going perfect, but what caused those can not be used together? Any details or rules?

BTW, the sql is used for Real-Time Calculation, there are some Window Functions code didn't show here.

  • What happens upon repeated execution? Also, Can you set track_io_timing to on? – jjanes Dec 14 '19 at 13:01
  • The main time is spent in the Index Only Scan. The Nested Loop only adds about 0.015ms to that. The total time in each node includes all children as well – a_horse_with_no_name Dec 14 '19 at 14:29
  • The order of columns in a multi-column index is important. The index can only be used efficiently if there are constraints on the leftmost columns. Also updated my answer. Consider creating a new question in the future for your update because your original question was answered and it contains a different question. – Florian Gutmann Dec 15 '19 at 14:49
4

The Nested Loop does not take much time actually. The actual time of 13.709..13.711 means that it took 13.709 ms until the first row was ready to be emitted from this node and it took 0.002 ms until it was finished.

Note that the startup cost of 13.709 ms includes the cost of its two child nodes. Both of the child nodes need to emit at least one row before the nested loop can start.

The Unique child began emitting its first (and only) row after 0.011 ms. The Index Only Scan child however only started to emit its first (and only) row after 13.695 ms. This means that most of your actual time spent is in this Index Only Scan.

There is a great answer here which explains the costs and actual times in depth.

Also there is a nice tool at https://explain.depesz.com which calculates an inclusive and exclusive time for each node. Here it is used for your query plan which clearly shows that most of the time is spent in the Index Only Scan.


Since the query is spending almost all of the time in this index only scan, optimizations there will have the most benefit. Creating a separate index for the columns uid and did on the operation table should improve query time a lot.

CREATE INDEX operation_uid_did ON operation(uid, did);

The current execution plan contains 2 index only scans.

A slow one:

  ->  Index Only Scan using oi on operation  (cost=0.42..29686.32 rows=100 width=24) (actual time=13.695..13.696 rows=1 loops=1)
        Index Cond: ((uid = operation_1.uid) AND (did = operation_1.did))
        Heap Fetches: 1
        Buffers: shared hit=4900

And a fast one:

  ->  Index Only Scan using oi on operation operation_1  (cost=0.42..8.44 rows=1 width=16) (actual time=0.011..0.011 rows=1 loops=1)
        Index Cond: (id = 993754)
        Heap Fetches: 1
        Buffers: shared hit=5

Both of them use the index oi but have different index conditions. Note how the fast one, who uses the id as index condition only needs to load 5 pages of data (Buffers: shared hit=5). The slow one needs to load 4900 pages instead (Buffers: shared hit=4900). This indicates that the index is optimized to query for id but not so much for uid and did. Probably the index oi covers all 3 columns id, uid, did in this order.


A multi-column btree index can only be used efficently when there are constraints in the query on the leftmost columns. The official documentation about multi-column indexes explains this very well in depth.

| improve this answer | |
  • I get it, thanks. I'll read the official documentation more carefully. – simline Dec 16 '19 at 15:12
  • It would be nice of you to mark the answer as accepted :-) – Florian Gutmann Dec 16 '19 at 16:09
1

Why does Nested Loop cost more and more time than sum of childs cost?

Based on your example, it doesn't. Can you elaborate on what makes you think it does?

Anyway, it seems extravagant to visit 4900 pages to fetch 1 tuple. I'm guessing your tables are not getting vacuumed enough.

Although now I prefer Florian's suggestion, that "uid" and "did" are not the leading columns of the index, and that is why it is slow. It is basically doing a full index scan, using the index as a skinny version of the table. It is a shame that EXPLAIN output doesn't make it clear when a index is being used in this fashion, rather than the traditional "jump to a specific part of the index"

So you have a missing index.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The 4900 pages are quite excessive indeed. The index oi is used twice in the plan. One time with condition on id and one time on uid and did. Since id access is reasonable, I came to the conclusion that the index covers something like (id, uid, did) and therefore is quite slow on uid and did alone. Do you think this conclusion is reasonable? – Florian Gutmann Dec 14 '19 at 13:19
  • 1
    Yes, that seems reasonable. – jjanes Dec 14 '19 at 13:29

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