10

I'd like to ensure that two interfaces are never found on the same class at compile-time, similar to how AttributeUsage checks custom Attributes at compile-time.

e.g.:

[InterfaceUsage(MutuallyExclusive = typeof(B))]
interface A {
    //...
}

interface B {
    //...
}

class C : A, B { //should throw an error on compile time
    //...
}

I can obviously do this at runtime with reflection, but I'm interested in a compile-time solution.

I'd imagine that one probably doesn't exist out of the box - but is there a way to create a custom attribute that is run at compile-time, much like AttributeUsage is?

  • 4
    Not with just the regular C# compiler... – Marc Gravell May 9 '11 at 12:56
  • 3
    You could build an FxCop rule. – Steven May 9 '11 at 12:57
  • 3
    Is it possible to use abstract classes instead of interfaces? – Mike Two May 9 '11 at 13:06
  • 6
    I would consider rethinking your object model, i.e. using composition instead of inheritance. If something can't be both an ICat and an IDog, then those shouldn't be interfaces. – Evan M May 9 '11 at 13:27
  • 2
    You'll likely get diminishing returns from a compile time solution. The .Net Framework makes no attempt to stop a user from making illogical interface implementation choices and neither should you! If it is absolutely necessary a few run-time checks are ok, but really, if a user wants to go out of their way to implement something silly (e.g. the hypothetical IQueue, IStack, and IDictionary all the while deriving from LinkedList) you should probably let them. – user7116 May 9 '11 at 14:57
7

A different approach could be to change them to Abstract classes.

2

How about giving them two methods with identical signatures, but incompatible return types?

  • I would consider this more of a warning since they can explicitly implement one of the interfaces. Although I'm pretty sure you can't do much better without an external tool. – ChaosPandion May 9 '11 at 13:16

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.