8

I'm using the Provider Package to manage state in my Flutter App. I am running into issues when I start nesting my objects.

A very simple example: Parent A has child of type B, which has child of type C, which has child of type D. In child D, I want to manage a color attribute. Code example below:

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

class A with ChangeNotifier
{
    A() {_b = B();}

    B _b;
    B get b => _b;

    set b(B value)
    {
        _b = value;
        notifyListeners();
    }
}

class B with ChangeNotifier
{
    B() {_c = C();}

    C _c;
    C get c => _c;

    set c(C value)
    {
        _c = value;
        notifyListeners();
    }
}

class C with ChangeNotifier
{
    C() {_d = D();}

    D _d;
    D get d => _d;

    set d(D value)
    {
        _d = value;
        notifyListeners();
    }
}

class D with ChangeNotifier
{
    int                 _ColorIndex = 0;
    final List<Color>   _ColorList = [
        Colors.black,
        Colors.blue,
        Colors.green,
        Colors.purpleAccent
    ];

    D()
    {
        _color = Colors.red;
    }

    void ChangeColor()
    {
        if(_ColorIndex < _ColorList.length - 1)
        {
            _ColorIndex++;
        }
        else
        {
            _ColorIndex = 0;
        }

        color = _ColorList[_ColorIndex];
    }

    Color _color;

    Color get color => _color;

    set color(Color value)
    {
        _color = value;
        notifyListeners();
    }
}

Now my main.dart (which is managing my Placeholder() widget) contains the following:

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';
import 'package:provider/provider.dart';
import 'package:provider_example/NestedObjects.dart';

void main() => runApp(MyApp());

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget
{
    @override
    Widget build(BuildContext context)
    {
        return MaterialApp(
            home: ChangeNotifierProvider<A>(
                builder: (context) => A(),
                child: MyHomePage()
            ),
        );
    }
}

class MyHomePage extends StatefulWidget
{

    @override
    State createState()
    {
        return _MyHomePageState();
    }
}

class _MyHomePageState extends State<MyHomePage>
{
    @override
    Widget build(BuildContext context)
    {
        A   a = Provider.of<A>(context);
        B   b = a.b;
        C   c = b.c;
        D   d = c.d;

        return Scaffold(
            body: Center(
                child: Column(
                    children: <Widget>[
                        Text(
                            'Current selected Color',
                        ),
                        Placeholder(color: d.color,),
                    ],
                ),
            ),
            floatingActionButton: FloatingActionButton(
                onPressed: () => ButtonPressed(context),
                tooltip: 'Increment',
                child: Icon(Icons.arrow_forward),
            ),
        );
    }

    void ButtonPressed(BuildContext aContext)
    {
        A   a = Provider.of<A>(context);
        B   b = a.b;
        C   c = b.c;
        D   d = c.d;

        d.ChangeColor();
    }
}

The above shows that the Placeholder Widget's color attribute is defined by Class D's color property (A -> B -> C -> D.color). The above code is extremely simplified, but it does show the issue I'm having.

Back to the point: how would I assign child D's color property to a widget, so that when updating child D's property, it also automatically updates the widget (using notifyListeners(), not setState()).

I've used Stateless, Stateful, Provider.of and Consumer, all which gives me the same result. Just to reiterate, the objects can't be decoupled, it has to have parent-child relationships.


EDIT

More complex example:

import 'dart:ui';

enum Manufacturer
{
    Airbus, Boeing, Embraer;
}

class Fleet
{
    List<Aircraft> Aircrafts;
}

class Aircraft
{
    Manufacturer        AircraftManufacturer;
    double              EmptyWeight;
    double              Length;
    List<Seat>          Seats;
    Map<int,CrewMember> CrewMembers;
}

class CrewMember
{
    String Name;
    String Surname;
}

class Seat
{
    int     Row;
    Color   SeatColor;
}

The above code is a simplified version of a real world example. As you can imagine the rabbit hole can go deeper and deeper. So, what I meant by the A through D example was trying to simplify the convolution of the situation.

Lets say for example you want to display and/or change a crew members' name in a widget. In the app itself you would typically select an Aircraft from the Fleet (passed to widget by List index), then select a CrewMember from the Aircraft (passed by Map key) and then display/change the Name of CrewMember.

In the end your widget will be able to see what Crew Member's name you are referring to by using the passed in Aircrafts index and CrewMembers key.

I'm definitely open to a better architecture and designs.

8
  • 1
    have you tried ProxyProvider ? – Abhay Koradiya Dec 17 '19 at 13:28
  • 1
    Consider having one ChangeNotifierProvider per ChangeNotifier, and potentially use ChangeNotifierProxyProvider to make a ChangeNotifier that depends on another one – Rémi Rousselet Dec 17 '19 at 13:37
  • Possibility of doing this aside, this strikes me as an antipattern. Having A through D all implementing ChangeNotifier as well as being children of one another as well as giving each of them a dedicated Provider (which you'd have to in order to get the nested classes to have their notifications processed correctly) sounds like a good way to start down a slippery slope toward dependency hell. I can't help but feel that whatever you need this for, there's a more efficient way to do it. – Abion47 Dec 17 '19 at 17:09
  • @Abion47 if that is what his dependency graph looks like, what would be a more efficient way to do it? Use a global service locator instead of Provider? – Frank Treacy Dec 17 '19 at 20:41
  • 1
    @frank06 It's hard to say without knowing exactly why his dependency graph looks like that. Perhaps a global service provider, or perhaps having the different services available in general to pass to normal providers without needing to bring proxy providers into it. Or maybe not all of the classes really need to be change notifiers. Or just say screw it and bring in something like BLoC. All I know is that this whole example just has the sort of smell that hints at it being more complicated than it needs to be. – Abion47 Dec 17 '19 at 21:32
7

EDIT: answer to the updated question, original below

It was not clear what A, B, C and D stood for in your original question. Turns out those were models.

My current thinking is, wrap your app with MultiProvider/ProxyProvider to provide services, not models.

Not sure how you are loading your data (if at all) but I assumed a service that asynchronously fetches your fleet. If your data is loaded by parts/models through different services (instead of all at once) you could add those to the MultiProvider and inject them in the appropriate widgets when you need to load more data.

The example below is fully functional. For the sake of simplicity, and since you asked about updating name as an example, I only made that property setter notifyListeners().

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';
import 'package:provider/provider.dart';

main() {
  runApp(
    MultiProvider(
      providers: [Provider.value(value: Service())],
      child: MyApp()
    )
  );
}

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  @override
  Widget build(context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      home: Scaffold(
        body: Center(
          child: Consumer<Service>(
            builder: (context, service, _) {
              return FutureBuilder<Fleet>(
                future: service.getFleet(), // might want to memoize this future
                builder: (context, snapshot) {
                  if (snapshot.hasData) {
                    final member = snapshot.data.aircrafts[0].crewMembers[1];
                    return ShowCrewWidget(member);
                  } else {
                    return CircularProgressIndicator();
                  }
                }
              );
            }
          ),
        ),
      ),
    );
  }
}

class ShowCrewWidget extends StatelessWidget {

  ShowCrewWidget(this._member);

  final CrewMember _member;

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return ChangeNotifierProvider<CrewMember>(
      create: (_) => _member,
      child: Consumer<CrewMember>(
        builder: (_, model, __) {
          return GestureDetector(
            onDoubleTap: () => model.name = 'Peter',
            child: Text(model.name)
          );
        },
      ),
    );
  }
}

enum Manufacturer {
    Airbus, Boeing, Embraer
}

class Fleet extends ChangeNotifier {
    List<Aircraft> aircrafts = [];
}

class Aircraft extends ChangeNotifier {
    Manufacturer        aircraftManufacturer;
    double              emptyWeight;
    double              length;
    List<Seat>          seats;
    Map<int,CrewMember> crewMembers;
}

class CrewMember extends ChangeNotifier {
  CrewMember(this._name);

  String _name;
  String surname;

  String get name => _name;
  set name(String value) {
    _name = value;
    notifyListeners();
  }

}

class Seat extends ChangeNotifier {
  int row;
  Color seatColor;
}

class Service {

  Future<Fleet> getFleet() {
    final c1 = CrewMember('Mary');
    final c2 = CrewMember('John');
    final a1 = Aircraft()..crewMembers = { 0: c1, 1: c2 };
    final f1 = Fleet()..aircrafts.add(a1);
    return Future.delayed(Duration(seconds: 2), () => f1);
  }

}

Run the app, wait 2 seconds for data to load, and you should see "John" which is crew member with id=1 in that map. Then double-tap the text and it should update to "Peter".

As you can notice, I am using top-level registering of services (Provider.value(value: Service())), and local-level registering of models (ChangeNotifierProvider<CrewMember>(create: ...)).

I think this architecture (with a reasonable amount of models) should be feasible.

Regarding the local-level provider, I find it a bit verbose, but there might be ways to make it shorter. Also, having some code generation library for models with setters to notify changes would be awesome.

(Do you have a C# background? I fixed your classes to be in line with Dart syntax.)

Let me know if this works for you.


If you want to use Provider you'll have to build the dependency graph with Provider.

(You could choose constructor injection, instead of setter injection)

This works:

main() {
  runApp(MultiProvider(
    providers: [
        ChangeNotifierProvider<D>(create: (_) => D()),
        ChangeNotifierProxyProvider<D, C>(
          create: (_) => C(),
          update: (_, d, c) => c..d=d
        ),
        ChangeNotifierProxyProvider<C, B>(
          create: (_) => B(),
          update: (_, c, b) => b..c=c
        ),
        ChangeNotifierProxyProvider<B, A>(
          create: (_) => A(),
          update: (_, b, a) => a..b=b
        ),
      ],
      child: MyApp(),
  ));
}

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  @override
  Widget build(context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      title: 'My Flutter App',
      home: Scaffold(
          body: Center(
              child: Column(
                  mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
                  children: <Widget>[
                      Text(
                          'Current selected Color',
                      ),
                      Consumer<D>(
                        builder: (context, d, _) => Placeholder(color: d.color)
                      ),
                  ],
              ),
          ),
          floatingActionButton: FloatingActionButton(
              onPressed: () => Provider.of<D>(context, listen: false).color = Colors.black,
              tooltip: 'Increment',
              child: Icon(Icons.arrow_forward),
          ),
      ),
    );
  }
}

This app works based on your A, B, C and D classes.

Your example does not use proxies as it only uses D which has no dependencies. But you can see Provider has hooked up dependencies correctly with this example:

Consumer<A>(
  builder: (context, a, _) => Text(a.b.c.d.runtimeType.toString())
),

It will print out "D".

ChangeColor() did not work because it is not calling notifyListeners().

There is no need to use a stateful widget on top of this.

8
  • Thanks for the answer. I added more information to my question. The Aircraft object has two children CrewMembers and Seats. How would you take into account these two base children in the answer (the objects not only being linearly related)? ( ChangeColor() should call notifyListeners() because it's declared in the setter ) – JBM Dec 18 '19 at 9:01
  • To answer your question, no, I don't believe this is scalable. Every new model class you would add to your app means new providers, new change notifiers, new consumers, and it becomes a bit of a spaghettified mess. The problem is that in this approach to state management, you're effectively having the state manage itself. There's a reason that in state management libraries (and in architecture design in general) the "model" and the "controller" are two separate entities. Instead of having each class and subclass in the model manage updates, have one controller that manages it all. – Abion47 Dec 18 '19 at 16:18
  • @Abion47 in more concrete terms, what would be your suggestion? Ditch the notifiers in favor of something like a stream/BLoC? – Frank Treacy Dec 18 '19 at 16:36
  • While I agree with this can be "more complicated than it needs to be", BLoC is terrible in terms of boilerplate. Terrible. With enough models, I'd argue it's worse than notifiers. Look at the official Todo sample app on the BLoC website – an insane amount of code for little functionality, too much liability for what it's worth. – Frank Treacy Dec 18 '19 at 17:04
  • 1
    Also to point out Remi's silent edit, you don't want to pass in a constructed value to the .value constructor of a provider. That constructor is for passing in pre-existing values. If you are creating the resource locally in that constructor, use the regular constructor with the create property. (See ChangeNotifierProvider docs) – Abion47 Dec 18 '19 at 17:14
5

As I've expressed before, the setup you have seems overly complicated. Every instance of a model class is a ChangeNotifier and is therefore responsible for maintaining itself. This is an architectural problem that is going to lead to scaling and maintenance issues down the line.

Just about every software architecture in existence has something in common - separate the state from the controller. Data should only just be data. It shouldn't need to concern itself with the operations of the rest of the program. Meanwhile, the controller (the bloc, the view model, the manager, the service, or whatever you want to call it) supplies the interface for the rest of the program to access or modify the data. In this way, we maintain a separation of concerns and reduce the number of points of interaction between services, thus greatly reducing relationships of dependency (which goes a long way toward keeping the program simple and maintainable).

In this case, a good fit might be the immutable state approach. In this approach, the model classes are just that - immutable. If you want to change something in a model, instead of updating a field, you swap out the entire model class instance. This might seem wasteful, but it actually creates several properties in your state management by design:

  1. Without the ability to change fields directly, consumers of the model are forced to use update endpoints in the controller instead.
  2. Each model class becomes a self-contained source of truth that no amount of refactoring in the rest of your program is going to affect, eliminating the side effects from over coupling.
  3. Each instance represents an entirely new state for your program to exist, so with the proper listening mechanism (achieved here with provider) it's extremely simple to tell the program to update based on a state change.

Here's an example of how your model classes might be represented by immutable state management:

main() {
  runApp(
    ChangeNotifierProvider(
      create: FleetManager(),
      child: MyApp(),
    ),
  );
}

...

class FleetManager extends ChangeNotifier {
  final _fleet = <String, Aircraft>{};
  Map<String, Aircraft> get fleet => Map.unmodifiable(_fleet);

  void updateAircraft(String id, Aircraft aircraft) {
    _fleet[id] = aircraft;
    notifyListeners();
  }

  void removeAircraft(String id) {
    _fleet.remove(id);
    notifyListeners();
  }
}

class Aircraft {
  Aircraft({
    this.aircraftManufacturer,
    this.emptyWeight,
    this.length,
    this.seats = const {},
    this.crewMembers = const {},
  });

  final String aircraftManufacturer;
  final double emptyWeight;
  final double length;
  final Map<int, Seat> seats;
  final Map<int, CrewMember> crewMembers;

  Aircraft copyWith({
    String aircraftManufacturer,
    double emptyWeight,
    double length,
    Map<int, Seat> seats,
    Map<int, CrewMember> crewMembers,
  }) => Aircraft(
    aircraftManufacturer: aircraftManufacturer ?? this.aircraftManufacturer,
    emptyWeight: emptyWeight ?? this.emptyWeight,
    length: length ?? this.length,
    seats: seats ?? this.seats,
    crewMembers: crewMembers ?? this.crewMembers,
  );

  Aircraft withSeat(int id, Seat seat) {
    return Aircraft.copyWith(seats: {
      ...this.seats,
      id: seat,
    });
  }

  Aircraft withCrewMember(int id, CrewMember crewMember) {
    return Aircraft.copyWith(seats: {
      ...this.crewMembers,
      id: crewMember,
    });
  }
}

class CrewMember {
  CrewMember({
    this.firstName,
    this.lastName,
  });

  final String firstName;
  final String lastName;

  CrewMember copyWith({
    String firstName,
    String lastName,
  }) => CrewMember(
    firstName: firstName ?? this.firstName,
    lastName: lastName ?? this.lastName,
  );
}

class Seat {
  Seat({
    this.row,
    this.seatColor,
  });

  final int row;
  final Color seatColor;

  Seat copyWith({
    String row,
    String seatColor,
  }) => Seat(
    row: row ?? this.row,
    seatColor: seatColor ?? this.seatColor,
  );
}

Whenever you want to add, modify, or remove an aircraft from the fleet, you go through the FleetManager, not the individual models. For example, if I had a crewmember and I wanted to change their first name, I'd do it like this:

final oldCrewMember = oldAircraft.crewMembers[selectedCrewMemberId];
final newCrewMember = oldCrewMember.copyWith(firstName: 'Jane');
final newAircraft = oldAircraft.withCrewMember(selectedCrewMemberId, newCrewMember);
fleetManager.updateAircraft(aircraftId, newAircraft);

Sure, it's a bit more verbose than just crewMember.firstName = 'Jane';, but consider the architectural benefits in play here. With this approach, we don't have a massive web of inter-dependencies, where a change anywhere could have repercussions in a ton other places, some of which may be unintentional. There is only one state, so there is only one place where something could possibly change. Anything else listening to this change has to go through FleetManager, so there is only one point of interface to need to worry about - one point of failure as opposed to potentially dozens. With all this architectural security and simplicity, a bit more verbosity in the code is a worthwhile trade.

This is a bit of a simple example, and though there are definitely ways to improve it, there are packages to handle this sort of stuff for us anyway. For more robust executions of immutable state management, I'd recommend checking out the flutter_bloc or redux packages. The redux package is essentially a direct port of Redux in React to Flutter, so if you have React experience you'll feel right at home. The flutter_bloc package takes a slightly less regimented approach to immutable state and also incorporates the finite state machine pattern, which further reduces the complexities surrounding how to tell what state your app is in at any given time.

(Also note that in this example, I changed the Manufacturer enum to just be a string field in the Airline class. This is because there are so many airline manufacturers in the world that it is going to be a chore keeping up with them all, and any manufacturer that isn't represented by the enum cannot be stored in the fleet model. Having it be a string is just one less thing you need to actively maintain.)

5
  • what did you think about Mobx, – TDM Dec 22 '20 at 10:56
  • @TDM I haven't tried using MobX in an actual project, so I don't know how scalable/maintainable it is in the long run. At first glance, it seems like a solid enough approach for people who like accessing everything using DAOs. Personally, I lean toward the simplicity and flexibility of using provider and ChangeNotifier together with my own homebrew MVVM approach, but that's a judgment call and a matter of personal preference. – Abion47 Jan 1 at 17:31
  • Personally I mostly liked for changeNotifier + provider , I have done some testing apps with mobx , But it doesnt fit as ChangeNotifier. So I decided to use ChangeNotifier + Provider for my all future projects. [Thanks for your thoughts about provider.] – TDM Jan 4 at 12:07
  • I agree with this answer for the fundamentals of reducing complexity and globalising state á la Redux. I think the answer could be improved by showing how an individual UI entity might update itself in response to state changes. For example, how does one update a UI element representing an individual CrewMember? Are you supposed to use a Provider.of<FleetManager>(context).fleet and then search through for the member? Surely this has implications for re-rendering other UI elements that have not been changed? Is it possible, with this version, to use a Consumer for the CrewMembers? – shennan May 28 at 14:58
  • @shennan With the Redux-style state management and reactivity paradigm, yes, you would rebuild all the dependencies of the entire fleet even if a single CrewMember was changed, and leave it up to Flutter to decide if it's worth rebuilding each Element if its corresponding Widget did or did not change. If this seems inefficient in this use case, that's because it is - and it's one of the shortcomings of the Redux-esque approach. If you want a setup that listens to individual CrewMember objects rather than the fleet as a whole, then that's a whole different answer. – Abion47 Jun 1 at 0:36

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