6

Given a numpy array of the form below:

x = [[4.,3.,2.,1.,8.],[1.2,3.1,0.,9.2,5.5],[0.2,7.0,4.4,0.2,1.3]]

is there a way to retain the top-3 values in each row and set others to zero in python (without an explicit loop). The result in the case of the example above would be

x = [[4.,3.,0.,0.,8.],[0.,3.1,0.,9.2,5.5],[0.0,7.0,4.4,0.0,1.3]]

Code for one example

import numpy as np
arr = np.array([1.2,3.1,0.,9.2,5.5,3.2])
indexes=arr.argsort()[-3:][::-1]
a = list(range(6))
A=set(indexes); B=set(a)
zero_ind=(B.difference(A)) 
arr[list(zero_ind)]=0

The output:

array([0. , 0. , 0. , 9.2, 5.5, 3.2])

Above is my sample code (with many lines) for a 1-D numpy array. Looping through each row of a numpy array and performing this same computation repeatedly would be quite expensive. Is there a simpler way?

2

5 Answers 5

4

Here is a fully vectorized code without third party outside numpy. It is using numpy's argpartition to efficiently find the k-th values. See for instance this answer for other use cases.

def truncate_top_k(x, k, inplace=False):
    m, n = x.shape
    # get (unsorted) indices of top-k values
    topk_indices = numpy.argpartition(x, -k, axis=1)[:, -k:]
    # get k-th value
    rows, _ = numpy.indices((m, k))
    kth_vals = x[rows, topk_indices].min(axis=1)
    # get boolean mask of values smaller than k-th
    is_smaller_than_kth = x < kth_vals[:, None]
    # replace mask by 0
    if not inplace:
        return numpy.where(is_smaller_than_kth, 0, x)
    x[is_smaller_than_kth] = 0
    return x    
1

Use np.apply_along_axis to apply a function to 1-D slices along a given axis

import numpy as np

def top_k_values(array):
    indexes = array.argsort()[-3:][::-1]
    A = set(indexes)
    B = set(list(range(array.shape[0])))
    array[list(B.difference(A))]=0
    return array

arr = np.array([[4.,3.,2.,1.,8.],[1.2,3.1,0.,9.2,5.5],[0.2,7.0,4.4,0.2,1.3]])
result = np.apply_along_axis(top_k_values, 1, arr)
print(result)

Output

[[4.  3.  0.  0.  8. ]
 [0.  3.1 0.  9.2 5.5]
 [0.  7.  4.4 0.  1.3]]
1
def top_k(arr, k, axis = 0):
    top_k_idx =  = np.take_along_axis(np.argpartition(arr, -k, axis = axis), 
                                      np.arange(-k,-1), 
                                      axis = axis)  # indices of top k values in axis
    out = np.zeros.like(arr)                        # create zero array
    np.put_along_axis(out, top_k_idx,               # put idx values of arr in out
                      np.take_along_axis(arr, top_k_idx, axis = axis), 
                      axis = axis)
    return out

This should work for arbitrary axis and k, but does not work in-place. If you want in-place it's a bit simpler:

def top_k(arr, k, axis = 0):
    remove_idx =  = np.take_along_axis(np.argpartition(arr, -k, axis = axis), 
                                           np.arange(arr.shape[axis] - k), 
                                           axis = axis)    # indices to remove
    np.put_along_axis(out, remove_idx, 0, axis = axis)     # put 0 in indices
0

Here is an alternative that use a list comprehension to look thru your array and applying the keep_top_3 function

import numpy as np
import heapq

def keep_top_3(arr): 
    smallest = heapq.nlargest(3, arr)[-1]  # find the top 3 and use the smallest as cut off
    arr[arr < smallest] = 0 # replace anything lower than the cut off with 0
    return arr 

x = [[4.,3.,2.,1.,8.],[1.2,3.1,0.,9.2,5.5],[0.2,7.0,4.4,0.2,1.3]]
result = [keep_top_3(np.array(arr)) for arr  in x]

I hope this helps :)

0

I was lead here looking for a function that does not retain equal values in the top-k result. So top-2 for the input would be:

input: [[1, 4, 0, 4, 0],
        [1, 0, 2, 1, 3],
        [1, 0, 1, 2, 1],
        [1, 3, 3, 2, 4],
        [4, 0, 3, 1, 0],
        [2, 3, 1, 4, 3],
        [4, 1, 0, 0, 4],
        [0, 2, 0, 1, 0],
        [2, 2, 1, 3, 2],
        [0, 2, 0, 1, 1]])

output: [[0., 4., 0., 4., 0.],
         [0., 0., 2., 0., 3.],
         [0., 0., 0., 2., 1.], # <- notice 1's set to 0
         [0., 3., 0., 0., 4.],
         [4., 0., 3., 0., 0.],
         [0., 3., 0., 4., 0.],
         [4., 0., 0., 0., 4.],
         [0., 2., 0., 1., 0.],
         [0., 0., 0., 3., 2.],
         [0., 2., 0., 0., 1.]])

I slightly modified the solution from Emile to result in:

def truncate_top_k(x, k):
    m, n = x.shape
    # get (unsorted) indices of top-k values
    topk_indices = numpy.argpartition(x, -k, axis=1)[:, -k:]
    # get the indices for the topk values (ties broken)
    rows, _ = numpy.indices((m, k))
    # mask out the unselected indices
    mask = numpy.zeros((m, n))
    mask[rows, topk_indices] = 1
    x = x * mask
    return x

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.