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I started using EF Core with Dapper and while trying to use them both inside a TransactionScope when I call context.SaveChanges() I get the error SqlConnection does not support parallel transactions. The code is the following:

public class TestController : ControllerBase
{
    private readonly MyDbContext dbContext;
    private readonly IDbConnection dbConnection;

    public TestController(MyDbContext dbContext,
        IDbConnection dbConnection)
    {
        this.dbContext = dbContext;
        this.dbConnection = dbConnection;
    }

    public void Test2()
    {
        using (IDbTransaction transaction = dbConnection.BeginTransaction())
        {
            Client client = new Client();
            client.ClientId = 3;
            client.Name = "New Client 3";

            dbContext.Entry<Client>(client).State = EntityState.Modified;

            List<Client> clients = new List<Client>();
            clients.Add(new Client
            {
                ClientId = 1,
                Name = "New Client 1",
            });
            clients.Add(new Client
            {
                ClientId = 2,
                Name = "New Client 2",
            });
            clients.Add(new Client
            {
                ClientId = 4,
                Name = "New Client 4",
            });

            string sql = "UPDATE Client SET Name = @Name WHERE ClientId = @ClientId;";

            try
            {
                dbConnection.Execute(sql, clients, transaction: transaction);

                dbContext.SaveChanges();

                transaction.Commit();
            }
            catch (System.Exception ex)
            {

            }
        }
    }
}

How can I mix EF Core and Dapper operations in a single transactionscope successfully?

3
  • When you use your dbContext, instead of injecting new instance. you should use using(var dbContext = new MyDbContext()). and your connection string should allow multiple connection with MultipleActiveResultSets=true in connection string – phonemyatt Dec 19 '19 at 7:47
  • @phonemyatt I dont think that is correct in my case. I am using autofac so I dont want to create new dbContext instances within a controller. – pantonis Dec 19 '19 at 7:50
  • any dependency injection will use interface to inject like you did with IDbConnection. may need to consider about your life cycle. I am suggesting to create MyDbContext in your controller because it is still logical the controller class use and dispose by itself. – phonemyatt Dec 19 '19 at 8:14
1

I found the solution to my problem for anyone having the same problem here is what I did.

public class TestController : ControllerBase
{
    private readonly MyDbContext dbContext;
    private readonly DbConnection dbConnection;

    public TestController(MyDbContext dbContext,
        DbConnection dbConnection)
    {
        this.dbContext = dbContext;
        this.dbConnection = dbConnection;
    }

    public void Test2()
    {
        IExecutionStrategy strategy = dbContext.Database.CreateExecutionStrategy();
        strategy.Execute(() =>
        {
            using (DbTransaction transaction = dbConnection.BeginTransaction())
            {
                Client client = new Client();
                client.ClientId = 3;
                client.Name = "New Client 3";

                dbContext.Database.UseTransaction(transaction);

                dbContext.Entry<Client>(client).State = EntityState.Modified;

                List<Client> clients = new List<Client>();
                clients.Add(new Client
                {
                    ClientId = 1,
                    Name = "New Client 1",
                });
                clients.Add(new Client
                {
                    ClientId = 2,
                    Name = "New Client 2",
                });
                clients.Add(new Client
                {
                    ClientId = 4,
                    Name = "New Client 4",
                });

                string sql = "UPDATE Client SET Name = @Name WHERE ClientId = @ClientId;";

                try
                {
                    dbContext.SaveChanges();

                    dbConnection.Execute(sql, clients, transaction: transaction);

                    transaction.Commit();
                }
                catch (System.Exception ex)
                {

                }
            }
        });
    }
}
1

in dotnet core 3.1 you could try the following. But its only for relational database though.

context.Database.UseTransaction((DbTransaction)transaction);
context.SaveChanges();
transaction.Commit();
1
  • Excellent, this worked like a charm. Fun part is I am using the connection from the context itself via: Context.Database.GetDbConnection() – Vedran Mandić Sep 4 '20 at 13:18
-1

below i made your code easier** to read.

why are you mixing ways of communicating with the db

i have left comments, this will help you determine where the actual issue is.

ps the reason is you open a transaction and then open another transaction... using (IDbTransaction transaction is an open and _dbContext.SaveChanges(); is also an transaction.

public class TestController : ControllerBase
{
    private readonly MyDbContext _dbContext;
    private readonly IDbConnection _dbConnection;

    public TestController(MyDbContext dbContext, IDbConnection dbConnection)
    {
        _dbContext = dbContext;
        _dbConnection = dbConnection;
    }

    public void Test2()
    {
        var client = new Client();
        client.ClientId = 3;
        client.Name = "New Client 3";

        //is the correct way to attach and entrity mark as modified.
         _dbContext.Entry<Client>(client).State = EntityState.Modified;
         _dbContext.SaveChanges();

        var clients = new List<Client>();
        clients.Add(new Client { ClientId = 1, Name = "New Client 1", });
        clients.Add(new Client { ClientId = 2, Name = "New Client 2", });
        clients.Add(new Client { ClientId = 4, Name = "New Client 4", });

        using (IDbTransaction transaction = _dbConnection.BeginTransaction())
        {
            string sql = "UPDATE Client SET Name = @Name WHERE ClientId = @ClientId;";
            //is this the correct way to call dapper
            _dbConnection.Execute(sql, clients, transaction: transaction);
            transaction.Commit();
        }
    }
}
3
  • For performance reasons I need to use both. p.s DbConnection is opened from the context using autofac container builder. I need both saves (EF Core and Dapper to be inside the same transaction block so that if one fails to not commit the other one. – pantonis Dec 19 '19 at 8:20
  • A lot. and the software is a SaaS so we try to keep costs low. – pantonis Dec 19 '19 at 8:42
  • a lot is relative..., and yes all for keeping costs down, im writing my own SaaS. EF, without tweaking can suck at performance, they should really give the tricks which are out there, out of the box so that multiple frameworks or custom extensions don't need to be written. – Seabizkit Dec 19 '19 at 8:58

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