30

I am fairly new to Spring and wondering how to create JUnit tests that use a mocked datasource and how to use a JNDI context with that? Currently my application uses a JNDI context from tomcat to retrieve a connection and via that connection retrieves data from a database. So I guess I need to mock the JNDI calls and the data retrieval. Any good pointers on what the best way to tackle this would be great! Thanks a lot!

32

I usually define my JNDI dependencies in seperate file, like datasource-context.xml:

<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xmlns:jee="http://www.springframework.org/schema/jee"
    xmlns:p="http://www.springframework.org/schema/p"
    xsi:schemaLocation="
        http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans 
        http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.0.xsd
        http://www.springframework.org/schema/jee
        http://www.springframework.org/schema/jee/spring-jee-3.0.xsd">

    <jee:jndi-lookup id="dataSource" 
        jndi-name="java:comp/env/dataSource" 
        expected-type="javax.sql.DataSource" />

</beans>

So that in test resources I can create another file and define the test datasource however it suits me, like datasource-testcontext.xml:

<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xmlns:p="http://www.springframework.org/schema/p"
    xsi:schemaLocation="
        http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans 
        http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.0.xsd">

    <bean id="dataSource"
        class="org.springframework.jdbc.datasource.DriverManagerDataSource"
        p:driverClassName="org.hsqldb.jdbcDriver"
        p:url="jdbc:hsqldb:hsql://localhost:9001"
        p:username="sa"
        p:password="" /> 

</beans>

And then in my test class I use the test configuration of the datasource instead of production one that depends on JNDI:

@ContextConfiguration({
    "classpath*:META-INF/spring/datasource-testcontext.xml",
    "classpath*:META-INF/spring/session-factory-context.xml"
})
public class MyTest {

}

If the data source is not defined in a separate file You can still stub the object returned by JNDI calls easily:

  • I did that, but I'm still getting exception Caused by: javax.naming.NoInitialContextException: Need to specify class name in environment or system property, or as an applet parameter, or in an application resource file: java.naming.factory.initial – fastcodejava Jul 30 '12 at 0:29
  • @fastcodejava You did what exactly? Used separate file for JNDI related configs? Created JNDI context in the test setup? Or used SimpleNamingContextBuilder? – Roadrunner Aug 10 '12 at 18:40
  • unfortunately the link to the oracle blog post seems dead. I cound not find an equivalend replacement... – Nicktar Nov 15 '18 at 9:00
33

You can use SimpleNamingContextBuilder to make a jndi datasource available to your tests:

    SimpleNamingContextBuilder builder = new SimpleNamingContextBuilder();
    builder.bind("java:comp/env/jdbc/mydatasource", dataSource);
    builder.activate();

https://fisheye.springsource.org/browse/spring-framework/spring-test/src/main/java/org/springframework/mock/jndi/SimpleNamingContextBuilder.java?hb=true

This isn't exactly mocking the datasource, but it does make the datasource available via jndi for your tests.

  • I did that, but I'm still getting exception Caused by: javax.naming.NoInitialContextException: Need to specify class name in environment or system property, or as an applet parameter, or in an application resource file: java.naming.factory.initial – fastcodejava Jul 30 '12 at 0:30
4

You can create your own mock DataSource by extending Spring's AbstractDataSource.

import java.sql.Connection;
import java.sql.SQLException;

import org.springframework.jdbc.datasource.AbstractDataSource;

/**
 * Mock implementation of DataSource suitable for use in testing.
 * 
 *
 */
public class MockDataSource extends AbstractDataSource {
    private Connection connection;

    /**
     * Sets the connection returned by javax.sql.DataSource#getConnection()
     * and javax.sql.DataSource#getConnection(java.lang.String, java.lang.String)
     * 
     * @param connection
     */
    public void setConnection(Connection connection) {
        this.connection = connection;
    }

    /*
     * (non-Javadoc)
     * @see javax.sql.DataSource#getConnection()
     */
    public Connection getConnection()
            throws SQLException {
        return connection;
    }

    /*
     * (non-Javadoc)
     * @see javax.sql.DataSource#getConnection(java.lang.String, java.lang.String)
     */
    public Connection getConnection(String username, String password)
            throws SQLException {
        return connection;
    }
}

I'd separate the JNDI lookup of the connection from the rest of the code. Inject the DataSource into your Data Access Objects (DAOs) and use the MockDataSource for testing the DAOs.

  • If I inject the datasource, would this not eliminate the need of a JNDI lookup? – Marco May 9 '11 at 20:10
  • It could. There are a number of ways in Spring to get the DataSource. Once you have it, you can inject. Spring can read a DataSource from JNDI, though. – Paul Croarkin May 9 '11 at 20:30
  • 1
    I edited your answer to remove the indent of the first line. Now the syntax highlighting works. I hope you don't mind. – Grzegorz Oledzki May 9 '11 at 21:27
  • @Grzegorz Thanks! – Paul Croarkin May 10 '11 at 12:25
2

You can allways create a beans.test.xml configuration, where you first reference the beans.xml, and then override the datasource configuration:

src/main/resources/beans.xml

<!-- Database configuration -->
<import resource="beans.datasource.jndi.xml" />

src/test/resources/beans.test.xml

<import resource="beans.xml" />
<import resource="beans.datasource.test.xml" />

JUnit Test Class:

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(locations = { "classpath:/beans.test.xml" })
public class ASRTests
{
...
}

In your jndi bean, declare the reference

<jee:jndi-lookup expected-type="javax.sql.DataSource" id="mysqlDataSource" jndi-name="jdbc/mysql"/>

In your test bean, declare the datasource

<bean id="mysqlDataSource" ...>
...
</bean>

Keep in mind to move the test datasource bean into test folder.

1

Spring's org.springframework.jndi.JndiObjectFactoryBean is best suited for JNDI lookups. As per its documentation, it allows injecting default values as well for spring based test cases.

Refer to the below spring configuration (named as spring-test-db-config.xml)

<bean id="dataSource" class="oracle.jdbc.pool.OracleDataSource">
    <property name="URL" value="jdbc:oracle:thin:@localhost:1521:XE"/>
    <property name="user" value="UNITTEST"/>
    <property name="password" value="UNITTEST"/>
</bean>

<bean id="dataSourceFromJndi" class="org.springframework.jndi.JndiObjectFactoryBean">
    <!-- Any junk value will suffice as that is always gonna throw NamingException -->
    <property name="jndiName" value="jdbc/Ds"/>
    <property name="defaultObject" ref="dataSource"/>
</bean>

Add bean defined on other configuration file shall refer to dataSourceFromJndi bean

<!-- START OF SERVICES -->
<bean class="com.sample.Service" >
    <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSourceFromJndi" />
</bean>

The advantage of this approach is that you can keep 2 different DB configuration files - one for production and other for unit testing. Just import the correct one. Test configuration will contain a default object.

0

Java Config.....

Junit Test Case

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration(classes = {DatabaseConfigStub.class}, loader= AnnotationConfigContextLoader.class)
public class DatabaseConfigTest  {

@Autowired
private DataSource datasource;
@Autowired
private JdbcTemplate jdbcTemplate;


@Before
public void setUp() throws Exception {

}

@After
public void tearDown() throws Exception {
}

@Test
public void testDataSource() {
    assertNotNull(datasource);
    assertNotNull(jdbcTemplate);
}

}

DatabaseConfigStub

public class DatabaseConfigStub {

private static final Logger log = Logger.getLogger(DatabaseConfigStub.class);

        private static final String DS_NAME = "jdbc/DS_NAME";

@Bean
DataSource dataSource() {
    JndiObjectFactoryBean jndiObjectBean = EasyMock.createMock(JndiObjectFactoryBean.class);
    jndiObjectBean.setJndiName(DS_NAME);
    jndiObjectBean.setResourceRef(true);
    jndiObjectBean.setProxyInterfaces(DataSource.class);

    EasyMock.expect( (DataSource)jndiObjectBean.getObject()).andReturn(new DataSource() {

            public <T> T unwrap(Class<T> iface) throws SQLException {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                return null;
            }

            public boolean isWrapperFor(Class<?> iface) throws SQLException {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                return false;
            }

            public void setLoginTimeout(int seconds) throws SQLException {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub

            }

            public void setLogWriter(PrintWriter out) throws SQLException {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub

            }

            public int getLoginTimeout() throws SQLException {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                return 0;
            }

            public PrintWriter getLogWriter() throws SQLException {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                return null;
            }

            public Connection getConnection(String username, String password)
                    throws SQLException {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                return null;
            }

            public Connection getConnection() throws SQLException {
                // TODO Auto-generated method stub
                return null;
            }
        }
    );
    EasyMock.replay(jndiObjectBean);

    return (DataSource) jndiObjectBean.getObject();
}

@Bean
JdbcTemplate jdbcTemplate(){
    return new JdbcTemplate( dataSource());
}

}

0

You can also use Simple-JNDI. It is an in-memory JNDI Implementation for working with JNDI contexts outside of a J2EE container. It lets you use the same bean definition file in production and test. Assume this is your bean definition in production:

<bean id="dataSource" class="org.springframework.jndi.JndiObjectFactoryBean">
    <property name="jndiName" value="java:comp/env/jdbc/DataSource"/>
</bean>
<bean id="dao" class="my.Dao">
    <property name="dataSource" ref="dataSource" />
</bean>

Create a property file like this

type=javax.sql.DataSource
driverClassName=org.gjt.mm.mysql.Driver
url=jdbc:mysql://localhost/testdb
username=user_name
password=password

Put Simple-JNDI and a jndi.properties file with a little configuration in your classpath. Then access your datasource as usual.

More about Simple-JNDI is found here.

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