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I have an app that will performs various operations on a database on a timer. The database is injected into the operator and all the dependencies and it works just fine. Now, I'd like to extend that to perform the same operations on two different databases, and would like to just create a timer for "Db1" and a second timer for "Db2". Is there an easy way to accomplish this with SimpleInjector?

Here's a current sample implementation:

public interface IDatabase { ...}
public class Operator {
    //Note: IOtherDependencies can also depend on IDatabase
    public Operator(IDatabase database, IOtherDependencies etc) { ... }
}
public class ConsoleApplicationTimer
{
    public void TimerWorkThread()
    {
        using (IoC.BeginScope())
        using(var app = IoC.Container.GetInstance<Operator>())
        {
            app.DoTheThings();
        }
    }
}
new ConsoleApplicationTimer().StartTimer();

Desired Future concept:

public class ConsoleApplicationTimer
{
    private readonly string _db;
    public ConsoleApplicationTimer(string db) { _db = db; }

    public void TimerWorkThread()
    {
        using (IoC.BeginScope())
        // Here, the app's IDatabase should be created with the appropriate connection, based on _db
        using(var app = IoC.Container.GetInstance<Operator>())
        {
            app.DoTheThings();
        }
    }
}
new ConsoleApplicationTimer("db1").StartTimer();
new ConsoleApplicationTimer("db2").StartTimer();

I thought about refactoring to the factory pattern, but I think that may be too big of a change, and all the other dependent code would have to accept a factory instead, and each connection "created" by the factory would not be unique in the scope?

Is there a SOLID way to accomplish this?

  • 1
    Is this the same database scheme only on a different server? And if not, where do they differ? – Ric .Net Dec 19 '19 at 16:34
  • Yes. Same database schema on different database / different server. The only difference should be the data contained. – Matt Murrell Dec 19 '19 at 18:57
  • So I guess it is not important to know to which of both you're talking? – Ric .Net Dec 19 '19 at 19:07
  • Not important to the app code. Could be useful in the logs, but the log entries would also include the the '_db' variable as well. – Matt Murrell Dec 19 '19 at 19:08

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