0

I need some help with creating new lists from a dictionary of lists. The processing has to happen in descending order. I need to create lists that link every kind of pairing that could happen.

var mappings = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>
{
    { "Policy", new List<string> { "PlPolicy" } },
    { "Location", new List<string> { "L1", "L2" } },
    { "Claim", new List<string> { "C1", "C2", "C3" } }
};

foreach (var keyValuePair in mappings.OrderByDescending(x => x.Value.Count))
{
     Console.WriteLine(@"Entity {0} has {1} items.", keyValuePair.Key, keyValuePair.Value.Count);
}

//I need to create lists that pair every kind of pairing that could happen.
//Example: (I think this is every iteration from the above dictionary)
//There are probably more here but this is just a sample.
var listOne = new List<string> {"C1", "L2", "PlPolicy"};
var listTwo = new List<string> {"C1", "L1", "PlPolicy"};
var listThree = new List<string> {"C2", "L2", "PlPolicy"};
var listFour = new List<string> {"C2", "L1", "PlPolicy"};
var listFive = new List<string> {"C3", "L1", "PlPolicy"};
var listSix = new List<string> {"C3", "L2", "PlPolicy"};

My brain is stuck at the moment so any help is appreciated...thanks

  • 3
    You can make a triple nested loop over each key in the dictionary and generate each combination in the inner-most loop. – Babak Naffas Dec 19 '19 at 21:16
2

Based on your example, what you are looking for is called the "cartesian product" of the dictionary's values. Eric Lippert has a series of blog posts about various ways of permuting and combining sets and sequences in C# including one about the generation of cartesian products via a linq extension method.

From the cited link, the following

public static class Program
{
    static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> CartesianProduct<T>(this IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> sequences)
    {
        IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> emptyProduct =
          new[] { Enumerable.Empty<T>() };
        return sequences.Aggregate(
          emptyProduct,
          (accumulator, sequence) =>
            from accseq in accumulator
            from item in sequence
            select accseq.Concat(new[] { item }));
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var mappings = new Dictionary<string, List<string>> {
            { "Policy", new List<string> { "PlPolicy" } },
            { "Location", new List<string> { "L1", "L2" } },
            { "Claim", new List<string> { "C1", "C2", "C3" } }
        };
        foreach(var triple in CartesianProduct(mappings.Values)) {
            Console.WriteLine( string.Join(" , ", triple) );
        }
     }
}    

generates

PlPolicy , L1 , C1
PlPolicy , L1 , C2
PlPolicy , L1 , C3
PlPolicy , L2 , C1
PlPolicy , L2 , C2
PlPolicy , L2 , C3
  • 1
    Thanks this worked very nicely! – Villain Dec 20 '19 at 17:13
0

You can do that simply by using LINQ to objects. Here is an example:

var mappings = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>
      {
          { "Policy", new List<string> { "PlPolicy" } },
          { "Location", new List<string> { "L1", "L2" } },
          { "Claim", new List<string> { "C1", "C2", "C3" } }
      };

      var query = from policy in mappings["Policy"]
                  from location in mappings["Location"]
                  from claim in mappings["Claim"]
                  select new { Policy = policy, Location = location, Claim = claim };

      var list = query.ToList();

      foreach (var item in list)
      {
        Console.WriteLine($"{item.Policy} - {item.Location} - {item.Claim}");
      }

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