104

Is it possible to include the headers somehow when using the MySQL INTO OUTFILE?

18 Answers 18

145

You'd have to hard code those headers yourself. Something like:

SELECT 'ColName1', 'ColName2', 'ColName3'
UNION ALL
SELECT ColName1, ColName2, ColName3
    FROM YourTable
    INTO OUTFILE '/path/outfile'
  • 10
    But it will not work if there is an ORDER BY in the SELECT clause. The header line can be anywhere in the generated file depending on the order. – COil May 19 '14 at 14:29
  • See a few answers below for ideas on using ORDER BY and also matt's answer for a way to quickly get all the ColName1, ColName2, etc. Very useful add-ons to this great answer! – Andrew T Oct 5 '15 at 1:11
  • 1
    This answer seems about right, hell I even used it almost blindly on my dev server... Without column headers, it takes about 50 seconds to dump 240million lines. With this UNION ALL, the server is getting into big troubles trying to do a temporary table before dumping everything, it has been over 10 minutes now and still waiting for the temporary table to get written on disk! Be aware of that! You'd certainly prefer adding the column names another way, even if it means opening the file after with another programming language. – Salketer May 2 '16 at 14:31
  • This only appears to work if all the columns of YourTable are a character data type, which does make sense. Otherwise you get the unhelpful error: "The used SELECT statements have a different number of columns". – TheBamf Jul 8 '16 at 11:37
  • 1
    This is one of the reasons why I'm considering switching to another DBMS. – e18r Jul 13 '16 at 0:34
77

The solution provided by Joe Steanelli works, but making a list of columns is inconvenient when dozens or hundreds of columns are involved. Here's how to get column list of table my_table in my_schema.

-- override GROUP_CONCAT limit of 1024 characters to avoid a truncated result
set session group_concat_max_len = 1000000;

select GROUP_CONCAT(CONCAT("'",COLUMN_NAME,"'"))
from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
WHERE TABLE_NAME = 'my_table'
AND TABLE_SCHEMA = 'my_schema'
order BY ORDINAL_POSITION

Now you can copy & paste the resulting row as first statement in Joe's method.

  • 1
    This returns all the columns concatenated together in a single field. I'm unable to union that with another select statement that returns multiple fields. This is really useful for getting a line I can copy and paste as the header of my outfile, though. – tmoore82 Nov 18 '14 at 19:13
  • 1
    The idea is to copy the resulting single field and paste that into your UNION statement instead of manually typing in column1, column2, etc when using Joe's method (the accepted answer) so you can get the list of columns quicker! – Andrew T Oct 5 '15 at 1:10
  • I was looking to export all my table/fields schema. This answer combined with the accepted one did the trick! – Rémi Breton Mar 15 '17 at 14:29
  • Very nice solution for a csv outfile!!!! – shadow0359 Jun 26 '18 at 13:39
  • @Chris ORDER BY ORDINAL_POSITION handles that – matt Nov 21 '18 at 19:25
13

For complex select with ORDER BY I use the following:

SELECT * FROM (
    SELECT 'Column name #1', 'Column name #2', 'Column name ##'
    UNION ALL
    (
        // complex SELECT statement with WHERE, ORDER BY, GROUP BY etc.
    )
) resulting_set
INTO OUTFILE '/path/to/file';
  • This solution works well when ordering the second (complex) query; if you don't do it this way you will end up ordering the first column also which is undesirable. Nice suggestion @evilguc! – Aaron Feb 4 '16 at 4:29
  • Did not work with me, after doing UNION ALL the order of id column is messed up – Mohanad Kaleia Jan 11 '18 at 20:09
6

I simply make 2 queries, first to get query output (limit 1) with column names (no hardcode, no problems with Joins, Order by, custom column names, etc), and second to make query itself, and combine files into one CSV file:

CSVHEAD=`/usr/bin/mysql $CONNECTION_STRING -e "$QUERY limit 1;"|head -n1|xargs|sed -e "s/ /'\;'/g"`
echo "\'$CSVHEAD\'" > $TMP/head.txt
/usr/bin/mysql $CONNECTION_STRING -e "$QUERY into outfile '${TMP}/data.txt' fields terminated by ';' optionally enclosed by '\"' escaped by '' lines terminated by '\r\n';"
cat $TMP/head.txt $TMP/data.txt > $TMP/data.csv
5

You can use prepared statement with lucek's answer and export dynamically table with columns name in CSV :

--If your table has too many columns
SET GLOBAL group_concat_max_len = 100000000;
--Prepared statement
SET @SQL = ( select CONCAT('SELECT * INTO OUTFILE \'YOUR_PATH\' FIELDS TERMINATED BY \',\' OPTIONALLY ENCLOSED BY \'"\' ESCAPED BY \'\' LINES TERMINATED BY \'\\n\' FROM (SELECT ', GROUP_CONCAT(CONCAT("'",COLUMN_NAME,"'")),' UNION select * from YOUR_TABLE) as tmp') from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS WHERE TABLE_NAME = 'YOUR_TABLE' AND TABLE_SCHEMA = 'YOUR_SCHEMA' order BY ORDINAL_POSITION );
--Execute it
PREPARE stmt FROM @SQL;
EXECUTE stmt;

Thank lucek.

5

This will alow you to have ordered columns and/or a limit

SELECT 'ColName1', 'ColName2', 'ColName3'
UNION ALL
SELECT * from (SELECT ColName1, ColName2, ColName3
    FROM YourTable order by ColName1 limit 3) a
    INTO OUTFILE '/path/outfile';
  • 1
    Just a note that this query layout worked for me in MariaDB 10.1 as well; other layouts suggested in this thread did not. – ProgrammerDan Dec 29 '16 at 14:09
  • Pops the header on the bottom for some reason, but works fine to pop that back on top in a spreadsheet app, strange but cheers – Dmitri DB Aug 2 '17 at 1:34
  • I'm stuck using mariaDB as well. with an extraction of just 100 leads, this was over 14 sec faster than running the accepted answer. First pass with accepted: Query OK, 100 rows affected (14.72 sec) Second pass with yours Query OK, 101 rows affected (0.00 sec) – Casper Wilkes Aug 4 '18 at 16:29
5

I faced similar problem while executing mysql query on large tables in NodeJS. The approach which I followed to include headers in my CSV file is as follows

  1. Use OUTFILE query to prepare file without headers

        SELECT * INTO OUTFILE [FILE_NAME] FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' OPTIONALLY ENCLOSED 
        BY '\"' LINES TERMINATED BY '\n' FROM [TABLE_NAME]
    
  2. Fetch column headers for the table used in point 1

        select GROUP_CONCAT(CONCAT(\"\",COLUMN_NAME,\"\")) as col_names from 
        INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS WHERE TABLE_NAME = [TABLE_NAME] AND TABLE_SCHEMA 
        = [DATABASE_NAME] ORDER BY ORDINAL_POSITION
    
  3. Append the column headers to the file created in step 1 using prepend-file npm package

Execution of each step was controlled using promises in NodeJS.

3

This is an alternative cheat if you are familiar with Python or R, and your table can fit into memory.

Import the SQL table into Python or R and then export from there as a CSV and you'll get the column names as well as the data.

Here's how I do it using R, requires the RMySQL library:

db <- dbConnect(MySQL(), user='user', password='password', dbname='myschema', host='localhost')

query <- dbSendQuery(db, "select * from mytable")
dataset <- fetch(query, n=-1)

write.csv(dataset, 'mytable_backup.csv')

It's a bit of a cheat but I found this was a quick workaround when my number of columns was too long to use the concat method above. Note: R will add a 'row.names' column at the start of the CSV so you'll want to drop that if you do need to rely on the CSV to recreate the table.

2

So, if all the columns in my_table are a character data type, we can combine the top answers (by Joe, matt and evilguc) together, to get the header added automatically in one 'simple' SQL query, e.g.

select * from (
  (select column_name
    from information_schema.columns
    where table_name = 'my_table'
    and table_schema = 'my_schema'
    order by ordinal_position)
  union all
  (select *  // potentially complex SELECT statement with WHERE, ORDER BY, GROUP BY etc.
  from my_table)) as tbl
into outfile '/path/outfile'
fields terminated by ',' optionally enclosed by '"' escaped by '\\'
lines terminated by '\n';

where the last couple of lines make the output csv.

Note that this may be slow if my_table is very large.

  • it has "The used SELECT statements have a different number of columns" error. Sir – Bowei Liu Jan 11 '17 at 0:41
1

Since the 'include-headers' functionality doesn't seem to be build-in yet, and most "solutions" here need to type the columns names manually, and/or don't even take joins into account, I'd recommand to get around the problem.

  • The best alternative I found so far is using a decent tool (I use HeidiSQL).
    Put your request, select the grid, just right click and export to a file. It got all necessary options for a clean export, ans should handle most needs.

  • In the same idea, user3037511's approach works fine, and can be automated easily.
    Just launch your request with some command line to get your headers. You may get the data with a SELECT INTO OUTFILE... or by running your query without the limit, yours to choose.

    Note that output redirect to a file works like a charm on both Linux AND Windows.


This makes me want to highlight that 80% of the time, when I want to use SELECT FROM INFILE or SELECT INTO OUTFILE, I end-up using something else due to some limitations (here, the absence of a 'headers options', on an AWS-RDS, the missing rights, and so on.)

Hence, I don't exactly answer to the op's question... but it should answer his needs :)
EDIT : and to actually answer his question : no
As of 2017-09-07, you just can't include headers if you stick with the SELECT INTO OUTFILE command
:|

1

an example from my database table name sensor with colums (id,time,unit)

select ('id') as id, ('time') as time, ('unit') as unit
UNION ALL
SELECT * INTO OUTFILE 'C:/Users/User/Downloads/data.csv'
  FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' OPTIONALLY ENCLOSED BY '"'
  LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'
  FROM sensor
0

I think if you use a UNION it will work:

select 'header 1', 'header 2', ...
union
select col1, col2, ... from ...

I don't know of a way to specify the headers with the INTO OUTFILE syntax directly.

  • 1
    UNION ALL would be safer and faster. – toxalot Dec 9 '13 at 18:40
0

Actually you can make it work even with an ORDER BY.

Just needs some trickery in the order by statement - we use a case statement and replace the header value with some other value that is guaranteed to sort first in the list (obviously this is dependant on the type of field and whether you are sorting ASC or DESC)

Let's say you have three fields, name (varchar), is_active (bool), date_something_happens (date), and you want to sort the second two descending:

select 
        'name'
      , 'is_active' as is_active
      , date_something_happens as 'date_something_happens'

 union all

 select name, is_active, date_something_happens

 from
    my_table

 order by
     (case is_active when 'is_active' then 0 else is_active end) desc
   , (case date when 'date' then '9999-12-30' else date end) desc
0

I was writing my code in PHP, and I had a bit of trouble using concat and union functions, and also did not use SQL variables, any ways I got it to work, here is my code:

//first I connected to the information_scheme DB

$headercon=mysqli_connect("localhost", "USERNAME", "PASSWORD", "information_schema");

//took the healders out in a string (I could not get the concat function to work, so I wrote a loop for it)

    $headers = '';
    $sql = "SELECT column_name AS columns FROM `COLUMNS` WHERE table_schema = 'YOUR_DB_NAME' AND table_name = 'YOUR_TABLE_NAME'";
    $result = $headercon->query($sql);
    while($row = $result->fetch_row())
    {
        $headers = $headers . "'" . $row[0] . "', ";
    }
$headers = substr("$headers", 0, -2);

// connect to the DB of interest

$con=mysqli_connect("localhost", "USERNAME", "PASSWORD", "YOUR_DB_NAME");

// export the results to csv
$sql4 = "SELECT $headers UNION SELECT * FROM YOUR_TABLE_NAME WHERE ... INTO OUTFILE '/output.csv' FIELDS TERMINATED BY ','";
$result4 = $con->query($sql4);
0

Here is a way to get the header titles from the column names dynamically.

/* Change table_name and database_name */
SET @table_name = 'table_name';
SET @table_schema = 'database_name';
SET @default_group_concat_max_len = (SELECT @@group_concat_max_len);

/* Sets Group Concat Max Limit larger for tables with a lot of columns */
SET SESSION group_concat_max_len = 1000000;

SET @col_names = (
  SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(QUOTE(`column_name`)) AS columns
  FROM information_schema.columns
  WHERE table_schema = @table_schema
  AND table_name = @table_name);

SET @cols = CONCAT('(SELECT ', @col_names, ')');

SET @query = CONCAT('(SELECT * FROM ', @table_schema, '.', @table_name,
  ' INTO OUTFILE \'/tmp/your_csv_file.csv\'
  FIELDS ENCLOSED BY \'\\\'\' TERMINATED BY \'\t\' ESCAPED BY \'\'
  LINES TERMINATED BY \'\n\')');

/* Concatenates column names to query */
SET @sql = CONCAT(@cols, ' UNION ALL ', @query);

/* Resets Group Contact Max Limit back to original value */
SET SESSION group_concat_max_len = @default_group_concat_max_len;

PREPARE stmt FROM @sql;
EXECUTE stmt;
DEALLOCATE PREPARE stmt;
  • 1
    Quite a solution should I say. Adopted it for my purposes. Thanks! – Denis Kulagin Dec 23 '18 at 8:12
0

I would like to add to the answer provided by Sangam Belose. Here's his code:

select ('id') as id, ('time') as time, ('unit') as unit
UNION ALL
SELECT * INTO OUTFILE 'C:/Users/User/Downloads/data.csv'
  FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' OPTIONALLY ENCLOSED BY '"'
  LINES TERMINATED BY '\n'
  FROM sensor

However, if you have not set up your "secure_file_priv" within the variables, it may not work. For that, check the folder set on that variable by:

SHOW VARIABLES LIKE "secure_file_priv"

The output should look like this:

mysql> show variables like "%secure_file_priv%";
+------------------+------------------------------------------------+
| Variable_name    | Value                                          |
+------------------+------------------------------------------------+
| secure_file_priv | C:\ProgramData\MySQL\MySQL Server 8.0\Uploads\ |
+------------------+------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set, 1 warning (0.00 sec)

You can either change this variable or change the query to output the file to the default path showing.

0

MySQL alone isn't enough to do this simply. Below is a PHP script that will output columns and data to CSV.

Enter your database name and tables near the top.

<?php

set_time_limit( 24192000 );
ini_set( 'memory_limit', '-1' );
setlocale( LC_CTYPE, 'en_US.UTF-8' );
mb_regex_encoding( 'UTF-8' );

$dbn = 'DB_NAME';
$tbls = array(
'TABLE1',
'TABLE2',
'TABLE3'
);

$db = new PDO( 'mysql:host=localhost;dbname=' . $dbn . ';charset=UTF8', 'root', 'pass' );

foreach( $tbls as $tbl )
{
    echo $tbl . "\n";
    $path = '/var/lib/mysql/' . $tbl . '.csv';

    $colStr = '';
    $cols = $db->query( 'SELECT COLUMN_NAME AS `column` FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS WHERE TABLE_NAME = "' . $tbl . '" AND TABLE_SCHEMA = "' . $dbn . '"' )->fetchAll( PDO::FETCH_COLUMN );
    foreach( $cols as $col )
    {
        if( $colStr ) $colStr .= ', ';
        $colStr .= '"' . $col . '"';
    }

    $db->query(
    'SELECT *
    FROM
    (
        SELECT ' . $colStr . '
        UNION ALL
        SELECT * FROM ' . $tbl . '
    ) AS sub
    INTO OUTFILE "' . $path . '"
    FIELDS TERMINATED BY ","
    ENCLOSED BY "\""
    LINES TERMINATED BY "\n"'
    );

    exec( 'gzip ' . $path );

    print_r( $db->errorInfo() );
}

?>

You'll need this to be the directory you'd like to output to. MySQL needs to have the ability to write to the directory.

$path = '/var/lib/mysql/' . $tbl . '.csv';

You can edit the CSV export options in the query:

INTO OUTFILE "' . $path . '"
FIELDS TERMINATED BY ","
ENCLOSED BY "\""
LINES TERMINATED BY "\n"'

At the end there is an exec call to GZip the CSV.

-2
SELECT 'ColName1', 'ColName2', 'ColName3'
UNION ALL
SELECT ColName1, ColName2, ColName3
    FROM YourTable
    INTO OUTFILE 'c:\\datasheet.csv' FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' OPTIONALLY ENCLOSED BY '"' LINES TERMINATED BY '\n' 

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