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There're a lot of questions on SO about details of pointer and array declarations in C (and C subset of C++).
I'm more interested in why.
Why do we have to put *, [] in front of every variable when we declare several pointers/arrays in a row?

int *a, *b;
int c[1], d[1];

Why do we have to type out things after/around variable names in function pointers?

void (*foo_ptr)(int, int);

Why do we have this feature that confuses a lot of newcomers, when even compilers recognize and report these things as part of type? Ex: function foo accepts int** but it was given int*

I guess I'm looking for intuition behind it that caused it being created this way, so that I can apply it to my understanding of the language. Right now I just don't see it...

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  • @Mat that's consequence of pointer symbol being next to name, not a cause. I believe in std::function from cpp it was solved via void*(int, int) vs void(int, int)* – Noone AtAll Dec 21 '19 at 13:14
  • You do not have to; you are free to declare typedef int *IntPointer; typedef int IntArrayOf1Element[1]; and then use IntPointer a, b; IntArrayOf1Element c, d;. – Eric Postpischil Dec 21 '19 at 13:15
  • @EricPostpischil I'm asking for intuition/logic behind language design. I know that there are workarounds, but that's not what I'm looking for. – Noone AtAll Dec 21 '19 at 13:20
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    The logic is that a declaration declares a list of things; int X, Y, Z; declares X, Y, and Z to be int, and each of X, Y, and Z is a “picture” of some expression, such as b, *b, b[10], *b[10], and so on. The actual type for the declared identifier is derived from the picture: Since *b[10] is an int, then b[10] is a pointer to an int, so b is an array of 10 pointers to int. – Eric Postpischil Dec 21 '19 at 13:22
  • @EricPostpischil Interesting proposal. I would've even accepted this intuition as an answer (if you make it an answer and not a comment). The only hole in your theory I see is that int a = 0, *b = 0 can't be changed to int X = 0, Y = 0 as easily as you suggest. But it feels close to truth. – Noone AtAll Dec 21 '19 at 13:38
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Kernighan and Ritchie write, in The C Programming Language, 1978, page 90:

The declaration of the pointer px is new.

int *px;

is intended as a mnemonic; it says the combination *px is an int, that is, if px occurs in the context *px, it is equivalent to a variable of the type int. In effect, the syntax of the declaration for a variable mimics the syntax of expressions in which the variable might appear. This reasoning is useful in all cases involving complicated declarations. For example,

double atof(), *dp;

says that in an expression atof() and *dp have values of type double.

Thus, we see that, in declarations such as int X, Y, Z, X, Y, and Z give us “pictures” of expressions, such as b, *b, b[10], *b[10], and so on. The actual type for the declared identifier is derived from the picture: Since *b[10] is an int, then b[10] is a pointer to an int, so b is an array of 10 pointers to int.

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Why do we have to put *, [] in front of every variable when we declare several pointers/arrays in a row?

The answer would be: explicit is better than implicit. In such a case we can even declare different types on the same row, int *a, *b, c; and so on, in another case it would be too messy. The same true for the second question.

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  • why would "declaring different types on the same row" be a good thing? why explicitly stating type "pointer of int" once is worse than stating "this line is for ints and this variable is a pointer, this variable is a pointer, this variable is a pointer"? – Noone AtAll Dec 21 '19 at 13:11
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    The pointer is just a variable that contains an address for an object with the type specified. If we would have "pointer of int", then we would need to create "special" pointer notation for every existing type. – funnydman Dec 21 '19 at 13:18
  • I think your comment gave me a revelation... But I don't have enough info nor trust in my imagination to confirm it. So, please, explain your reasons: why "variable that contains an address with the type" should be treated same way as "variable of the type"? (also isn't pointer notation already "special pointer notation for every existing type"???) – Noone AtAll Dec 21 '19 at 13:53
  • Here int *pt pt is a pointer (stores the address of some int). In this case, int notations mean that the pointer contains the address of different int. So, for example, char *c contains the address of some different char. So, writing int a, *p - we claim that the a has the type int itself, while *p refers to the int. It's was made to have things more consistent. I guess it would be much harder to deal with int and PointerInt types and so on... – funnydman Dec 21 '19 at 14:06

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