10

Here is a simple C# .NET Core 3.1 program that calls System.Numerics.Vector2.Normalize() in a loop (with identical input every call) and prints out the resulting normalized vector:

using System;
using System.Numerics;
using System.Threading;

namespace NormalizeTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            Vector2 v = new Vector2(9.856331f, -2.2437377f);
            for(int i = 0; ; i++)
            {
                Test(v, i);
                Thread.Sleep(100);
            }
        }

        static void Test(Vector2 v, int i)
        {
            v = Vector2.Normalize(v);
            Console.WriteLine($"{i:0000}: {v}");
        }
    }
}

And here is the output of running that program on my computer (truncated for brevity):

0000: <0.9750545, -0.22196561>
0001: <0.9750545, -0.22196561>
0002: <0.9750545, -0.22196561>
...
0031: <0.9750545, -0.22196561>
0032: <0.9750545, -0.22196561>
0033: <0.9750545, -0.22196561>
0034: <0.97505456, -0.22196563>
0035: <0.97505456, -0.22196563>
0036: <0.97505456, -0.22196563>
...

So my question is, why does the result of calling Vector2.Normalize(v) change from <0.9750545, -0.22196561> to <0.97505456, -0.22196563> after calling it 34 times? Is this expected, or is this a bug in the language/runtime?

2
  • Floats are weird
    – Milney
    Dec 22 '19 at 18:19
  • 2
    @Milney Maybe, but they’re also deterministic. This behaviour isn’t explained solely by floats being weird. Dec 31 '19 at 9:29
14

So my question is, why does the result of calling Vector2.Normalize(v) change from <0.9750545, -0.22196561> to <0.97505456, -0.22196563> after calling it 34 times?

So first - why the change occurs. The changed is observed because the code that calculates those values changes too.

If we break into WinDbg early on in the first executions of the code and go a little bit down into the code that calculates the Normalizeed vector, we could see the following assembly (more or less - I've cut down some parts):

movss   xmm0,dword ptr [rax]
movss   xmm1,dword ptr [rax+4]
lea     rax,[rsp+40h]
movss   xmm2,dword ptr [rax]
movss   xmm3,dword ptr [rax+4]
mulss   xmm0,xmm2
mulss   xmm1,xmm3
addss   xmm0,xmm1
sqrtss  xmm0,xmm0
lea     rax,[rsp+40h]
movss   xmm1,dword ptr [rax]
movss   xmm2,dword ptr [rax+4]
xorps   xmm3,xmm3
movss   dword ptr [rsp+28h],xmm3
movss   dword ptr [rsp+2Ch],xmm3
divss   xmm1,xmm0
movss   dword ptr [rsp+28h],xmm1
divss   xmm2,xmm0
movss   dword ptr [rsp+2Ch],xmm2
mov     rax,qword ptr [rsp+28h]

and after ~30 executions (more about this number later) this would be the code:

vmovsd  xmm0,qword ptr [rsp+70h]
vmovsd  qword ptr [rsp+48h],xmm0
vmovsd  xmm0,qword ptr [rsp+48h]
vmovsd  xmm1,qword ptr [rsp+48h]
vdpps   xmm0,xmm0,xmm1,0F1h
vsqrtss xmm0,xmm0,xmm0
vinsertps xmm0,xmm0,xmm0,0Eh
vshufps xmm0,xmm0,xmm0,50h
vmovsd  qword ptr [rsp+40h],xmm0
vmovsd  xmm0,qword ptr [rsp+48h]
vmovsd  xmm1,qword ptr [rsp+40h]
vdivps  xmm0,xmm0,xmm1
vpslldq xmm0,xmm0,8
vpsrldq xmm0,xmm0,8
vmovq   rcx,xmm0

Different opcodes, different extensions - SSE vs AVX and, I guess, with different opcodes we get different precision of the calculations.

So now more about the why? .NET Core (not sure about the version - assuming 3.0 - but it was tested in 2.1) has something that's called "Tiered JIT compilation". What it does is at the beginning it produces code that is generated fast, but might not be super optimal. Only later when the runtime detects that the code is highly utilized will it spend some additional time to generates new, more optimized code. This is a new thing in .NET Core so such behavior might not be observed earlier.

Also why 34 calls? This is a bit strange as I would expect this to happen around 30 executions as this is the threshold at which tiered compilation kicks in. The constant can be seen in the source code of coreclr. Maybe there is some additional variability to when it kicks in.

Just to confirm that this is the case, you can disable tiered compilation by setting the environmental variable by issuing set COMPlus_TieredCompilation=0 and checking the execution again. The strange effect is gone.

C:\Users\lukas\source\repos\FloatMultiple\FloatMultiple\bin\Release\netcoreapp3.1
λ FloatMultiple.exe

0000: <0,9750545  -0,22196561>
0001: <0,9750545  -0,22196561>
0002: <0,9750545  -0,22196561>
...
0032: <0,9750545  -0,22196561>
0033: <0,9750545  -0,22196561>
0034: <0,9750545  -0,22196561>
0035: <0,97505456  -0,22196563>
0036: <0,97505456  -0,22196563>
^C
C:\Users\lukas\source\repos\FloatMultiple\FloatMultiple\bin\Release\netcoreapp3.1
λ set COMPlus_TieredCompilation=0

C:\Users\lukas\source\repos\FloatMultiple\FloatMultiple\bin\Release\netcoreapp3.1
λ FloatMultiple.exe

0000: <0,97505456  -0,22196563>
0001: <0,97505456  -0,22196563>
0002: <0,97505456  -0,22196563>
...
0032: <0,97505456  -0,22196563>
0033: <0,97505456  -0,22196563>
0034: <0,97505456  -0,22196563>
0035: <0,97505456  -0,22196563>
0036: <0,97505456  -0,22196563>

Is this expected, or is this a bug in the language/runtime?

There's already a bug reported for this - Issue 1119

6
  • They don't have a clue what causes it. Hopefully the OP can follow up and post a link to your answer here. Dec 31 '19 at 9:48
  • 1
    Thanks for the thorough and informative answer! That bug report is actually my report that I filed after posting this question, not knowing whether it was really a bug or not. Sounds like they do consider the changing value to be unwanted behavior that could result in heisenbugs and something that should be fixed.
    – Walt D
    Dec 31 '19 at 11:28
  • Yeah, I should have checked the repo before doing the analysis at 2 AM :) Anyway it was interesting problem to look into. Dec 31 '19 at 11:36
  • @HansPassant Sorry, I'm not sure what you're suggesting I do. Can you please clarify?
    – Walt D
    Dec 31 '19 at 11:38
  • That github issue was posted by you, wasn't it? Just let them know that they guessed wrong. Dec 31 '19 at 11:42

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