100

I have multiple dicts/key-value pairs like this:

d1 = {key1: x1, key2: y1}  
d2 = {key1: x2, key2: y2}  

I want the result to be a new dict (in most efficient way, if possible):

d = {key1: (x1, x2), key2: (y1, y2)}  

Actually, I want result d to be:

d = {key1: (x1.x1attrib, x2.x2attrib), key2: (y1.y1attrib, y2.y2attrib)}  

If somebody shows me how to get the first result, I can figure out the rest.

4
  • 4
    @Salil: Can we assume that each key is present in all dictionaries? – Björn Pollex May 10 '11 at 6:55
  • possible duplicate of merging Python dictionaries – Johnsyweb May 10 '11 at 7:15
  • Hi Space_C0wb0y, yes, the keys are present in all dictionaries. – Salil May 10 '11 at 7:42
  • It's absolutely crucial to specify whether all dicts have same keys. – yugr Sep 1 '18 at 17:27

16 Answers 16

53

assuming all keys are always present in all dicts:

ds = [d1, d2]
d = {}
for k in d1.iterkeys():
    d[k] = tuple(d[k] for d in ds)

Note: In Python 3.x use below code:

ds = [d1, d2]
d = {}
for k in d1.keys():
  d[k] = tuple(d[k] for d in ds)

and if the dic contain numpy arrays:

ds = [d1, d2]
d = {}
for k in d1.keys():
  d[k] = np.concatenate(list(d[k] for d in ds))
5
  • 3
    Just "for k in d1" would do I think. – Salil May 10 '11 at 8:38
  • and d.get(k, None) in place of d[k] – tahir May 23 '13 at 14:05
  • 1
    @tahir This would mean that dicts have non-matching keys so iterating over d1 is not correct (it may miss keys in other dicts). – yugr Sep 1 '18 at 17:26
  • 1
    For python 3 users: d1.iterkeys() =d1.items() – Riley Sep 7 '18 at 7:35
  • It still doesn't work for me in Python3.x. I've tried this even if my values are not arrays, and it works. However, the values output will be arrays. stackoverflow.com/questions/54040858/… – Ric S Jan 8 '19 at 21:18
84

Here's a general solution that will handle an arbitrary amount of dictionaries, with cases when keys are in only some of the dictionaries:

from collections import defaultdict

d1 = {1: 2, 3: 4}
d2 = {1: 6, 3: 7}

dd = defaultdict(list)

for d in (d1, d2): # you can list as many input dicts as you want here
    for key, value in d.items():
        dd[key].append(value)

print(dd)

Shows:

defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {1: [2, 6], 3: [4, 7]})

Also, to get your .attrib, just change append(value) to append(value.attrib)

8
  • I think the OP wants the values as tuple not list. – user225312 May 10 '11 at 7:08
  • 1
    @A A: does it really matter? tuples will be more tricky to build in the more general case of multiple input dicts where some keys present not everywhere, imho – Eli Bendersky May 10 '11 at 7:10
  • 1
    You may then want to make a normal dict out of the defaultdict so you have normal dict behavior for non-existent keys etc: dd = dict(dd) – Ned Deily May 10 '11 at 7:12
  • @Ned: good point, but it depends on the eventual use of the data – Eli Bendersky May 10 '11 at 7:14
  • @Eli: No it doesn't matter but I was just trying to base it on what the OP wanted and was hoping that there would be a solution for tuples from you :-) – user225312 May 10 '11 at 7:28
5

Here is one approach you can use which would work even if both dictonaries don't have same keys:

d1 = {'a':'test','b':'btest','d':'dreg'}
d2 = {'a':'cool','b':'main','c':'clear'}

d = {}

for key in set(d1.keys() + d2.keys()):
    try:
        d.setdefault(key,[]).append(d1[key])        
    except KeyError:
        pass

    try:
        d.setdefault(key,[]).append(d2[key])          
    except KeyError:
        pass

print d

This would generate below input:

{'a': ['test', 'cool'], 'c': ['clear'], 'b': ['btest', 'main'], 'd': ['dreg']}
1
  • Can set(d1.keys() + d2.keys()) be changed to set(list(d1.keys()) + list(d2.keys())) in the answer (for Python 3.x)? Otherwise it will throw a TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'dict_keys' and 'dict_keys' error, in python3.x – R4444 Dec 17 '18 at 19:20
4

If you only have d1 and d2,

from collections import defaultdict

d = defaultdict(list)
for a, b in d1.items() + d2.items():
    d[a].append(b)
4
dict1 = {'m': 2, 'n': 4}
dict2 = {'n': 3, 'm': 1}

Making sure that the keys are in the same order:

dict2_sorted = {i:dict2[i] for i in dict1.keys()}

keys = dict1.keys()
values = zip(dict1.values(), dict2_sorted.values())
dictionary = dict(zip(keys, values))

gives:

{'m': (2, 1), 'n': (4, 3)}
14
  • 2
    Order of elements in values() is undefined so you may be merging values from unrelated keys. – yugr Sep 1 '18 at 16:18
  • I just applied the changes so it can now capture your feedback – Mahdi Ghelichi Sep 3 '18 at 15:09
  • I don't think the change will fix the issue. You need to use sorted(d.items()) or sorted(d.keys()) to achieve predictable results. – yugr Sep 4 '18 at 8:17
  • Can you give an example that prove it otherwise? dict2_sorted is a sorted dictionary in python ! – Mahdi Ghelichi Sep 4 '18 at 13:58
  • 1
    I did a small research on this. In recent versions of Python (3.6+) iteration order started to match insertion order (see e.g. here) which makes your code pass. But this is considered to be an implementation detail which shouldn't be relied on. My second example (see here) reliably fails in onlinegdb which uses old Python 3.4. Other online interpreters use newer Pythons so issue can not be reproduced there. – yugr Sep 5 '18 at 15:07
3

This function merges two dicts even if the keys in the two dictionaries are different:

def combine_dict(d1, d2):
    return {
        k: tuple(d[k] for d in (d1, d2) if k in d)
        for k in set(d1.keys()) | set(d2.keys())
    }

Example:

d1 = {
    'a': 1,
    'b': 2,
}
d2` = {
    'b': 'boat',
    'c': 'car',
}
combine_dict(d1, d2)
# Returns: {
#    'a': (1,),
#    'b': (2, 'boat'),
#    'c': ('car',)
# }
1

Python 3.x Update

From Eli Bendersky answer:

Python 3 removed dict.iteritems use dict.items instead. See Python wiki: https://wiki.python.org/moin/Python3.0

from collections import defaultdict

dd = defaultdict(list)

for d in (d1, d2):
    for key, value in d.items():
        dd[key].append(value)
1

Assume that you have the list of ALL keys (you can get this list by iterating through all dictionaries and get their keys). Let's name it listKeys. Also:

  • listValues is the list of ALL values for a single key that you want to merge.
  • allDicts: all dictionaries that you want to merge.
result = {}
for k in listKeys:
    listValues = [] #we will convert it to tuple later, if you want.
    for d in allDicts:
       try:
            fileList.append(d[k]) #try to append more values to a single key
        except:
            pass
    if listValues: #if it is not empty
        result[k] = typle(listValues) #convert to tuple, add to new dictionary with key k
0
def merge(d1, d2, merge):
    result = dict(d1)
    for k,v in d2.iteritems():
        if k in result:
            result[k] = merge(result[k], v)
        else:
            result[k] = v
    return result

d1 = {'a': 1, 'b': 2}
d2 = {'a': 1, 'b': 3, 'c': 2}
print merge(d1, d2, lambda x, y:(x,y))

{'a': (1, 1), 'c': 2, 'b': (2, 3)}
0

To supplement the two-list solutions, here is a solution for processing a single list.

A sample list (NetworkX-related; manually formatted here for readability):

ec_num_list = [((src, tgt), ec_num['ec_num']) for src, tgt, ec_num in G.edges(data=True)]

print('\nec_num_list:\n{}'.format(ec_num_list))
ec_num_list:
[((82, 433), '1.1.1.1'),
  ((82, 433), '1.1.1.2'),
  ((22, 182), '1.1.1.27'),
  ((22, 3785), '1.2.4.1'),
  ((22, 36), '6.4.1.1'),
  ((145, 36), '1.1.1.37'),
  ((36, 154), '2.3.3.1'),
  ((36, 154), '2.3.3.8'),
  ((36, 72), '4.1.1.32'),
  ...] 

Note the duplicate values for the same edges (defined by the tuples). To collate those "values" to their corresponding "keys":

from collections import defaultdict
ec_num_collection = defaultdict(list)
for k, v in ec_num_list:
    ec_num_collection[k].append(v)

print('\nec_num_collection:\n{}'.format(ec_num_collection.items()))
ec_num_collection:
[((82, 433), ['1.1.1.1', '1.1.1.2']),   ## << grouped "values"
((22, 182), ['1.1.1.27']),
((22, 3785), ['1.2.4.1']),
((22, 36), ['6.4.1.1']),
((145, 36), ['1.1.1.37']),
((36, 154), ['2.3.3.1', '2.3.3.8']),    ## << grouped "values"
((36, 72), ['4.1.1.32']),
...] 

If needed, convert that list to dict:

ec_num_collection_dict = {k:v for k, v in zip(ec_num_collection, ec_num_collection)}

print('\nec_num_collection_dict:\n{}'.format(dict(ec_num_collection)))
  ec_num_collection_dict:
  {(82, 433): ['1.1.1.1', '1.1.1.2'],
  (22, 182): ['1.1.1.27'],
  (22, 3785): ['1.2.4.1'],
  (22, 36): ['6.4.1.1'],
  (145, 36): ['1.1.1.37'],
  (36, 154): ['2.3.3.1', '2.3.3.8'],
  (36, 72): ['4.1.1.32'],
  ...}

References

0

From blubb answer:

You can also directly form the tuple using values from each list

ds = [d1, d2]
d = {}
for k in d1.keys():
  d[k] = (d1[k], d2[k])

This might be useful if you had a specific ordering for your tuples

ds = [d1, d2, d3, d4]
d = {}
for k in d1.keys():
  d[k] = (d3[k], d1[k], d4[k], d2[k]) #if you wanted tuple in order of d3, d1, d4, d2
0

This library helped me, I had a dict list of nested keys with the same name but with different values, every other solution kept overriding those nested keys.

https://pypi.org/project/deepmerge/

from deepmerge import always_merger

def process_parms(args):
    temp_list = []
    for x in args:
        with open(x, 'r') as stream:
            temp_list.append(yaml.safe_load(stream))

    return always_merger.merge(*temp_list)
0

If keys are nested:

d1 = { 'key1': { 'nkey1': 'x1' }, 'key2': { 'nkey2': 'y1' } } 
d2 = { 'key1': { 'nkey1': 'x2' }, 'key2': { 'nkey2': 'y2' } }
ds = [d1, d2]
d = {}
for k in d1.keys():
    for k2 in d1[k].keys():
        d.setdefault(k, {})
        d[k].setdefault(k2, [])
        d[k][k2] = tuple(d[k][k2] for d in ds)

yields:

{'key1': {'nkey1': ('x1', 'x2')}, 'key2': {'nkey2': ('y1', 'y2')}}
0

Assuming there are two dictionaries with exact same keys, below is the most succinct way of doing it (python3 should be used for both the solution).


d1 = {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c':3}
d2 = {'a': 5, 'b': 6, 'c':7} 

# get keys from one of the dictionary
ks = [k for k in d1.keys()]

print(ks)
['a', 'b', 'c']

# call values from each dictionary on available keys
d_merged = {k: (d1[k], d2[k]) for k in ks}

print(d_merged)
{'a': (1, 5), 'b': (2, 6), 'c': (3, 7)}

# to merge values as list
d_merged = {k: [d1[k], d2[k]] for k in ks}
print(d_merged)
{'a': [1, 5], 'b': [2, 6], 'c': [3, 7]}

If there are two dictionaries with some common keys, but a few different keys, a list of all the keys should be prepared.


d1 = {'a': 1, 'b': 2, 'c':3, 'd': 9}
d2 = {'a': 5, 'b': 6, 'c':7, 'e': 4} 

# get keys from one of the dictionary
d1_ks = [k for k in d1.keys()]
d2_ks = [k for k in d2.keys()]

all_ks = set(d1_ks + d2_ks)

print(all_ks)
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e']

# call values from each dictionary on available keys
d_merged = {k: [d1.get(k), d2.get(k)] for k in all_ks}

print(d_merged)
{'d': [9, None], 'a': [1, 5], 'b': [2, 6], 'c': [3, 7], 'e': [None, 4]}

0

A better representation for two or more dicts with the same keys is a pandas Data Frame IMO:

d1 = {"key1": "x1", "key2": "y1"}  
d2 = {"key1": "x2", "key2": "y2"}  
d3 = {"key1": "x3", "key2": "y3"}  

d1_df = pd.DataFrame.from_dict(d1, orient='index')
d2_df = pd.DataFrame.from_dict(d2, orient='index')
d3_df = pd.DataFrame.from_dict(d3, orient='index')

fin_df = pd.concat([d1_df, d2_df, d3_df], axis=1).T.reset_index(drop=True)
fin_df

    key1 key2
0   x1   y1
1   x2   y2
2   x3   y3
-4

A compact possibility

d1={'a':1,'b':2}
d2={'c':3,'d':4}
context={**d1, **d2}
context
{'b': 2, 'c': 3, 'd': 4, 'a': 1}
1
  • the question is about merging dicts with same key. your is not the required answer. – Pbd Apr 24 '17 at 5:19

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