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I have file (node_list.txt) which is having list of nodes.

nod_1
nod_2
nod_3
nod_4
nod_5

I have list of host ip address(this count may vary) and need to devide the node_list into equal number of parts and send those splitted node files to each of the hosts. host_ip1 host_ip2 host_ip3

Dividing of nodes in the file are based on number of host_ip's available.

Here in my example I should get:

node_list_file_1.txt
nod_1
nod_2

node_list_file_2.txt
nod_3
nod_4

node_list_file_3.txt
nod_5

My code looks like this:

print Dumper(\@list_of_hosts);

my $node_file = "node_list.txt";
open(NODE_FILE, "< $node_file") or die "can't open $node_file: $!";
my $count;
$count += tr/\n/\n/ while sysread(NODE_FILE, $_, 2 ** 16);
print "COUNT:$count\n";

my $res = $count / scalar @list_of_ips;

In $res I am getting the count how much number of lines should go to each of the file. But how to put this into file.

8
  • Open the output files, storing the handles in an array. Step through the input file, writing each line to the appropriate file based on the array. Keep going until finished. Note that you don't need to know how big the input file is (how many lines it contains); you only need to know how many output files you want. Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 6:30
  • Also, you should avoid the old-fashioned NODE_FILE style of file handles and use lexically scoped file handles: open my $fh, "<", $node_file or die; Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 6:35
  • To check what need be done when number of files to write doesn't evenly divide number of lines: for 10 lines to break into 3 files do you need lines per file as 4-4-2 or 4-3-3 ?
    – zdim
    Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 8:42
  • @zdim, Or put differently, if there were 5 hosts and 26 nodes, 6-5-5-5-5 or 6-6-6-6-2? (Personally, I don't see how the latter is close to the "equal" the OP requested. But I'll give you the benefit of the doubt for now)
    – ikegami
    Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 8:50
  • @ikegami Yes, an even better example. While they do indeed say "equal number of parts" (what I missed at first), that's a little thin for a spec so I asked for confirmation.
    – zdim
    Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 8:53

3 Answers 3

3

This splits lines so that each file except the last receives the maximum equal number, whereby the last one gets the remainder. So with 10 lines to split over 3 files they'll go as 4-4-2.

use warnings;
use strict;
use feature 'say';
use autodie qw(open);

my @lines = <>;
my $num_files = 3;
my $lines_per_file = int @lines/$num_files;
$lines_per_file += 1  if @lines % $num_files;

my @chunks;
push @chunks, [ splice @lines, 0, $lines_per_file ] while @lines;

my @fhs_out = map { open my $fh, ">fout_$_.txt"; $fh } 1..$num_files;

for my $i (0..$#chunks) { 
    print {$fhs_out[$i]} $_ for @{$chunks[$i]};
};

Notes

  • The <> reads all lines from files submitted at the command line

  • If the number of files to write doesn't evenly divide the number of lines to split between them, we need one more line in each file (and the last one receives the remainder)

  • The array with lines is successively splice-ed, in order to generate chunks of lines that will go into one file each, so it ends up emptied

  • I open all needed output files and store filehandles into an array so to later conveniently write chunks of lines into their files. This is by no means necessary, as one can iterate over @chunks and open a file and write to it for each group ("chunk") of lines

  • When writing to a filehandle that need be evaluated from an expression any more complex that just a basic scalar we must have that in a block, like { $fhs_out[$i] }. From print

    If you're storing handles in an array or hash, or in general whenever you're using any expression more complex than a bareword handle or a plain, unsubscripted scalar variable to retrieve it, you will have to use a block returning the filehandle value instead, [...]

    See this post for another way and more discussion.


If the distribution of lines must be 4-3-3 in this case, so split as evenly as possible, the code above need be modified like

my $lines_per_file = int @lines/$num_files;
my $extra = @lines % $num_files;

my @chunks;
push @chunks,
     [ splice @lines, 0, $lines_per_file + ( $extra-- > 0 ? 1 : 0 ) ] 
         while @lines;

The rest is the same.

0
2
my $num_buckets = 3;

my @lines = <>;

my $per_bucket = int( @lines / $num_buckets );
my $num_extras =      @lines % $num_buckets;

for my $bucket_num (0..$num_buckets-1) {
   my $num_lines = $per_bucket;
   if ($num_extras) {
      ++$num_lines;
      --$num_extras;
   }

   my $qfn = "node_list_file_${bucket_num}.txt";
   open(my $fh, '>', $qfn)
      or die("Can't create \"$qfn\": $!\n");

   $fh->print(splice(@lines, 0, $num_lines));
}

$per_bucket is the number of nodes per file.
$num_extras is how many files that have one extra node.

Note that the calculation of $num_lines can be condensed to the following (which I avoided for readability):

my $num_lines = $per_bucket + ( $num_extras-- > 0 );

The above loads the entire file into memory. The following is an alternative solution that doesn't:

my $num_buckets = 3;

my @fhs;
for my $bucket_num (1..$num_buckets) {
   my $qfn = "node_list_file_${bucket_num}.txt";
   open(my $fh, '>', $qfn)
      or die("Can't create \"$qfn\": $!\n");

   push @fhs, $fh;
}

$fhs[ ( $. - 1 ) % @fhs ]->print($_) while <>;

However, while it performs the requested task, the output isn't exactly as specified:

node_list_file_1.txt
--------------------
nod_1
nod_4

node_list_file_2.txt
--------------------
nod_2
nod_5

node_list_file_3.txt
--------------------
nod_3
6
  • Thank you @ikegami. So, in your first solution I should store all the input file line contents to @lines. In second solution can you pls elaborate what this condition means $fhs[ ( $. - 1 ) % @fhs ]->print($_) while <>; and how can I take input file?
    – vkk05
    Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 8:12
  • <> is short for <ARGV>, which is short for readline(ARGV), and ARGV is a special handle that reads from the files whose paths are in @ARGV, or from STDIN if @ARGV is empty. In short, it acts like virtually every unix program (e.g., cat, grep, etc) Feel free to use a different handle.
    – ikegami
    Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 8:15
  • ... and while <> is short for while defined($_ = <>)
    – ikegami
    Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 8:31
  • In both the cases, if we mention $num_buckets = 3; then it will create 3 files obviously. But what if I have only 2 lines of data in node_list.txt say nod_1 node_2 and it should create 2 files only? Since its been creating 3rd file too with empty data in it. How to avoid it?
    – vkk05
    Commented Dec 30, 2019 at 11:17
  • Using the first approach, simply check if the number of lines to print is zero. /// Using the second, it's a bit more complicated. You'd have to delay creating the file until it's needed. You'd use something like $fh[$i] //= do { ... }; in the loop.
    – ikegami
    Commented Dec 30, 2019 at 20:37
-1

Perhaps following code comply with your requirements

use strict;
use warnings;

use feature 'say';

use Data::Dumper;

my $debug = 1;                          # $debug = 1 -- debug mode

my $node_file = "node_list.txt";        # input filename

my @hosts = qw(host_ip1 host_ip2 host_ip3); # Hosts to distribute between

my $num_hosts = @hosts;                 # Number of hosts to distribute between

open(my $fh, "<", $node_file) 
        or die "can't open $node_file: $!";

my @nodes =  <$fh>;                     # read input lines into @nodes array

chomp @nodes;                           # trim newline from each element @nodes array

close $fh;

print Dumper(\@nodes) if $debug;        # print @nodes content in debug mode

my $count = @nodes;                     # count number nodes in @nodes array

print "COUNT: $count lines in the input file\n";

# How many lines store in out files
my $lines_in_file = int($count/$num_hosts + 0.5);

my $lines_out   = $lines_in_file;       # how many line to output per file
my $file_index  = 1;                    # index for output filenames
my $filename    = "node_list_file_${file_index}.txt";

# open OUT file
open(my $out, ">", $filename)
        or die "Couldn't open $filename";

foreach my $node_name (@nodes) {        # process each element of @nodes array
    say $out $node_name;                # store node in OUT file

    $lines_out--;                       # decrease number of left lines for output

    if( $lines_out == 0 ) {             # all lines per file stored
        close $out;                     # close file

        $lines_out = $lines_in_file;    # reinitialize number of lines for output

        $file_index++;                  # increase index for filename
        $filename = "node_list_file_${file_index}.txt";

        open($out, ">", $filename)      # open new OUT file
            or die "Couldn't open $filename";
    }
}

close $out;                             # close OUT file
24
  • Thank you. What if I have odd number of lines in input node file? Ex:If I have 11 nodes in input files and needed to put in 6 files (2 in each) and the final one should contain 1 node. Is it possible here?
    – vkk05
    Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 7:44
  • Please avoid needlessly using global vars (NODE_FILE, OUT)
    – ikegami
    Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 8:06
  • Please avoid needlessly using 2-arg open
    – ikegami
    Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 8:06
  • There's no need to chomp.
    – ikegami
    Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 8:07
  • 1
    More importantly, it only works if there are exactly 5 or 6 nodes in the input file. (4 does 2/2/0 instead of 2/1/1, and 7 does 2/2/2 instead of 3/2/2.)
    – ikegami
    Commented Dec 26, 2019 at 8:12

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