14

Using hooks, If I call setState with the same value as the state, will it rerender the component?

If yes, how can I avoid that?

e.g.

const [state, setState] = useState(foo)

...
// any where in the code
setState(foo)

Considering that foo can be any thing, such as {}, true, props.bar or a variable from out side of the component (constant).

3 Answers 3

14

It won't re-render the component if you call setState with the same value.

Try this out:

import React, { useState, useEffect } from "react";

const foo = { foo: 'bar' };

export default ({ name }) => {
  const [state, setState] = useState(foo);
  console.log("rendered!");
  useEffect(() => {
    setState(foo);
    console.log("state reset!");
  });

  const handleClick = () => {
    console.log("handleClick!");
    setState(foo);
    // setState({ ...foo, bar : 'baz' });
  }

  return (<div>
  <h1>Hello {name}!</h1>
  <button onClick={handleClick}>Click Me</button>
  </div>);
};

You'll notice that even when the button is clicked since the value has not changed. it's not re-rendering the Component. If you change the argument that you call setState with, it will re-render the component.


Here's a Code Sample for your ref.

Try commenting the first setState and un-commenting the second one inside the handleClick method to see the difference.

3
  • I think, it is not re rendered, it is re evaluated by the virtual dom, and if there is a change only then re render occurs in the real dom? Jan 3 at 21:41
  • 1
    Just wanted to add another reference to confirm this. The React Hooks docs mention: If your update function returns the exact same value as the current state, the subsequent rerender will be skipped completely. reactjs.org/docs/hooks-reference.html#functional-updates
    – Joyce Lee
    Feb 24 at 7:42
  • Adding a note here for the above example. If you use a literal object like this setState({ foo: 'bar' }), it will always be re-rendered even if the object looks the same. That's because each time a literal object is created, it's considered different from the old object. Just like when you compare two literal object {a: 1} === {a: 1} it returns false
    – Cuong Vu
    Mar 17 at 13:00
8

just to summarize

if your state is a primitive value(number, string, boolean, ...), then setting the same value using setState hook won't trigger a rerender. If your state is an Object or Array then it will behave differently.

https://overreacted.io/how-are-function-components-different-from-classes/
https://dmitripavlutin.com/value-vs-reference-javascript/

2
  • I don't think we should differentiate. If it's the same (same reference) object or array, either because it's declared outside of the render function or through useMemo, it won't trigger a rerender. So we can simply say "if Object.is(prevValue, newValue) returns true, it won't rerender".
    – Ricola
    May 9 at 13:02
  • true, in addition to that, as far as I know, react uses Object.is() method for comparing values in dependency arrays(useMemo, useEffect, etc). I'm assuming that it also uses that method for comparing values which you pass as a parameter to setState function and your current state. May 10 at 5:15
2

It's a js syntax related question, Just like === operation.

let times = 0
const init = {name: 'Bob'}
function App() {
  const [state, setState] = useState(init)
  function modify() {
    setState({name: 'Bob'})
  }
  function modify2() {
    setState(init)
  }
  times ++
  return (
    <div className="App">
      <p>{ times }</p>
      <button onClick={modify}>Same Value Will Rerender</button>
      <button onClick={modify2}>Same Reference Never Rerender</button>
    </div>
  );
}

Here's a Code Sandbox

You can rewrite a wrapper method:

let times = 0
const init = {name: 'Bob'}
function App() {
  const [state, setState] = useState(init)
  function modify3() {
    setState2({ name: 'Bob' })
  }
  function setState2(value) {
    if (value.name === state.name) {
      return
    }
    setState(value)
  }
  times ++
  return (
    <div className="App">
      <p>{ times }</p>
      <button onClick={modify3}>Same Value Will Not Rerender Yet</button>
    </div>
  );
}

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