60

I'm looking to create an EnvironmentObject that can be accessed by the View Model (not just the view).

The Environment object tracks the application session data, e.g. loggedIn, access token etc, this data will be passed into the view models (or service classes where needed) to allow calling of an API to pass data from this EnvironmentObjects.

I have tried to pass in the session object to the initialiser of the view model class from the view but get an error.

how can I access/pass the EnvironmentObject into the view model using SwiftUI?

8
  • Why not pass viewmodel as the EO? – E.Coms Dec 26 '19 at 18:11
  • Seems over the top, there will be many view models, the upload I have linked is just a simplified example – Michael Dec 26 '19 at 19:17
  • 3
    I'm not sure why this question was downvoted, I'm wondering the same. I'll answer with what I have done, hopefully someone else may come up with something better. – Michael Ozeryansky Dec 26 '19 at 23:38
  • 2
    @E.Coms I expected EnvironmentObject to generally be one object. I know multiple work, it seems like a code smell to make them globally accessible like that. – Michael Ozeryansky Dec 26 '19 at 23:40
  • @Michael Did you even find a solution to this ? – Brett Feb 16 '20 at 22:53
11

You shouldn't. It's a common misconception that SwiftUI works best with MVVM. MVVM has no place in SwiftUI. You are asking that if you can shove a rectangle to fit a triangle shape. It wouldn't fit.

Let's start with some facts and work step by step:

  1. ViewModel is a model in MVVM.

  2. MVVM does not take value types (e.g.; no such thing in Java) into consideration.

  3. A value type model (model without state) is considered safer than reference type model (model with state) in the sense of immutability.

Now, MVVM requires you to set up a model in such way that whenever it changes, it updates the view in some pre-determined way. This is known as binding.

Without binding, you won't have nice separation of concerns, e.g.; refactoring out model and associated states and keeping them separate from view.

These are the two things most iOS MVVM developers fail:

  1. iOS has no "binding" mechanism in traditional Java sense. Some would just ignore binding, and think calling an object ViewModel automagically solves everything; some would introduce KVO-based Rx, and complicate everything when MVVM is supposed to make things simpler.

  2. Model with state is just too dangerous because MVVM put too much emphasis on ViewModel, too little on state management and general disciplines in managing control; most of the developers end up thinking a model with state that is used to update view is reusable and testable. This is why Swift introduces value type in the first place; a model without state.

Now to your question: you ask if your ViewModel can have access to EnvironmentObject (EO)?

You shouldn't. Because in SwiftUI a model that conforms to View automatically has reference to EO. E.g.;

struct Model: View {
    @EnvironmentObject state: State
    // automatic binding in body
    var body: some View {...}
}

I hope people can appreciate how compact SDK is designed.

In SwiftUI, MVVM is automatic. There's no need for a separate ViewModel object that manually binds to view which requires an EO reference passed to it.

The above code is MVVM. E.g.; a model with binding to view. But because model is value type, so instead of refactoring out model and state as view model, you refactor out control (in protocol extension, for example).

This is official SDK adapting design pattern to language feature, rather than just enforcing it. Substance over form. Look at your solution, you have to use singleton which is basically global. You should know how dangerous it is to access global anywhere without protection of immutability, which you don't have because you have to use reference type model!

TL;DR

You don't do MVVM in java way in SwiftUI. And the Swift-y way to do it is no need to do it, it's already built-in.

Hope more developer see this since this seemed like a popular question.

14
  • 12
    "ViewModel is a model in MVVM." No. ViewModel is a view model in MVVM. The model and the view are other entities. It's perfectly fine to use MVVM with SwiftUI. – mcatach Aug 24 '20 at 22:50
  • 1
    "No. ViewModel is a view model in MVVM". Here's a counter example. – Jim lai Aug 26 '20 at 13:13
  • 2
    So, without using a view model how would you load data over a service using a data task publisher to display in a view? – Caleb Friden Sep 6 '20 at 5:06
  • 2
    A dedicated network service object customized to fit project needs. Decouple networking from view or model. There's this common misconception that you have to use "view model" to do "networking". No, you use networking to do networking. E.g.; resource.post(params).onSuccess { json in self.data = json} then use property observer to do model-view update, e.g.; var data = JSON() { didSet { updateUI() }}. None of these require the notion of view model, yet it does the same thing. This is MVVM without VM, or adapting MVVM to Swift language features. – Jim lai Sep 15 '20 at 3:42
  • 1
    Provide a good read why mvvm is not good for those who are interested. You should also search using "why mvvm is not good" as keyword to gain more insights. Note that it is written in 2015, let me assure you that with Swift and SwiftUI, MVVM is even more pointless now. You don't create a view model object for every view then manually create binding for every view model. Because it would be insanely inefficient and frankly dumb. – Jim lai Oct 3 '20 at 17:54
10

Below provided approach that works for me. Tested with many solutions started with Xcode 11.1.

The problem originated from the way EnvironmentObject is injected in view, general schema

SomeView().environmentObject(SomeEO())

ie, at first - created view, at second created environment object, at third environment object injected into view

Thus if I need to create/setup view model in view constructor the environment object is not present there yet.

Solution: break everything apart and use explicit dependency injection

Here is how it looks in code (generic schema)

// somewhere, say, in SceneDelegate

let someEO = SomeEO()                            // create environment object
let someVM = SomeVM(eo: someEO)                  // create view model
let someView = SomeView(vm: someVM)              // create view 
                   .environmentObject(someEO)

There is no any trade-off here, because ViewModel and EnvironmentObject are, by design, reference-types (actually, ObservableObject), so I pass here and there only references (aka pointers).

class SomeEO: ObservableObject {
}

class BaseVM: ObservableObject {
    let eo: SomeEO
    init(eo: SomeEO) {
       self.eo = eo
    }
}

class SomeVM: BaseVM {
}

class ChildVM: BaseVM {
}

struct SomeView: View {
    @EnvironmentObject var eo: SomeEO
    @ObservedObject var vm: SomeVM

    init(vm: SomeVM) {
       self.vm = vm
    }

    var body: some View {
        // environment object will be injected automatically if declared inside ChildView
        ChildView(vm: ChildVM(eo: self.eo)) 
    }
}

struct ChildView: View {
    @EnvironmentObject var eo: SomeEO
    @ObservedObject var vm: ChildVM

    init(vm: ChildVM) {
       self.vm = vm
    }

    var body: some View {
        Text("Just demo stub")
    }
}
3
  • I am just starting out with MVVM and this is the closest thing to what I want to do. I was surprised that I couldn't access my EnvironmentObjects inside my ObservableObject ViewModel. The only thing I don't like is that the view model is exposed either in the SceneDelegate or in the parent view, which I don't think is quite right. It makes more sense to me for the View Model to be created inside the View. However currently I don't see a way around this and your solution is the best so far. – Brett Jul 22 '20 at 2:41
  • So on one hand for views, we can implement the environment object styling of passing dependencies on the other hand for ViewModels, we need tp pass it down the chain (which SwiftUI tries to avoid by introducing EnvironmentObjects) – G.Abhisek Nov 12 '20 at 0:15
  • In your SomeView, should you vm declaration be a @StateObject and not an @ObservedObject? – SparkyRobinson May 31 at 23:12
4

I choose to not have a ViewModel. (Maybe time for a new pattern?)

I have setup my project with a RootView and some child views. I setup my RootView with a App object as the EnvironmentObject. Instead of the ViewModel accessing Models, all my views access classes on App. Instead of the ViewModel determining the layout, the view hierarchy determine the layout. From doing this in practice for a few apps, I've found my views are staying small and specific. As an over simplification:

class App {
   @Published var user = User()

   let networkManager: NetworkManagerProtocol
   lazy var userService = UserService(networkManager: networkManager)

   init(networkManager: NetworkManagerProtocol) {
      self.networkManager = networkManager
   }

   convenience init() {
      self.init(networkManager: NetworkManager())
   }
}
struct RootView {
    @EnvironmentObject var app: App

    var body: some View {
        if !app.user.isLoggedIn {
            LoginView()
        } else {
            HomeView()
        }
    }
}
struct HomeView: View {
    @EnvironmentObject var app: App

    var body: some View {
       VStack {
          Text("User name: \(app.user.name)")
          Button(action: { app.userService.logout() }) {
             Text("Logout")
          }
       }
    }
}

In my previews, I initialize a MockApp which is a subclass of App. The MockApp initializes the designated initializers with the Mocked object. Here the UserService doesn't need to be mocked, but the datasource (i.e. NetworkManagerProtocol) does.

struct HomeView_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        Group {
            HomeView()
                .environmentObject(MockApp() as App) // <- This is needed for EnvironmentObject to treat the MockApp as an App Type
        }
    }

}
1
  • 1
    the App should derive from ObservableObject – onthemoon Jan 27 at 11:26
4

You can do it like this:

struct YourView: View {
  @EnvironmentObject var settings: UserSettings

  @ObservedObject var viewModel = YourViewModel()

  var body: some View {
    VStack {
      Text("Hello")
    }
    .onAppear {
      self.viewModel.setup(self.settings)
    }
  }
}

For the ViewModel:

class YourViewModel: ObservableObject {
  
  var settings: UserSettings?
  
  func setup(_ settings: UserSettings) {  
    self.settings = settings
  }
}
5
  • This is sick.. are there any downsides? No matter how I think.. my swiftui code always end up in MVVM, It's just the most natural and structured! – Mofawaw Sep 1 '20 at 15:14
  • Didn't see any downsides for now... it works very well, and I'm using it to change Tabs from the viewModel – mcatach Sep 2 '20 at 16:27
  • The downside is you would always end up having optionals. – G.Abhisek Nov 11 '20 at 11:09
  • 1
    One more downside is your updates in settings will not be communicated to view automatically as you would lose the flexibility of ObservableObject and EnvironmentObject. – G.Abhisek Nov 12 '20 at 1:08
  • I have observed that the onAppear is called after the view has been displayed. So if you needed to use some logic from the viewModel with the settings you would not get it. – onthemoon Jan 27 at 11:03
2

The Resolver library does a nice job to get dependency injection for model classes. It provides a property wrapper @Injected which is very similar in spirit to @EnvironmentObject but works everywhere. So in a model, I would inject a ExampleService like this:

class ExampleModel: ObservableObject {

    @Injected var service: ExampleService

    // ...
}

This can also be used to resolve dependencies for Views:

struct ExampleView: View {

    @ObservedObject var exampleModel: ExampleModel = Resolver.resolve()

    var body: some View {
        // ...
    }
}

An alternative for Views is to use @EnvironmentObject in the SwiftUI view hierarchy, but this gets a little bit cumbersome because you'll have two dependency-injection containers, Resolver/@Injected for everything that's app-wide/service-like and SwiftUI/@EnvironmentObject in the view hierarchy for everything that relates to views/for view models.

1
  • I like the concept of Resolver and I can see the benefit of having the capability to inject app-wide not only into Views but also into Models. However, on second thought I don't like to depend on a 3rd party solution. Isn't there a nice SwiftUI-Combine-only way ? – iKK Apr 15 at 16:01
0

This is the simplest way I have found to access and update an @EnvironmentObject property within a viewModel:

// ContentView.swift

import SwiftUI

struct ContentView: View {
    @EnvironmentObject var store: Store

    var body: some View {
        Child(viewModel: ChildViewModel(store))
    }
}

// Child.swift

import SwiftUI

struct Child: View {
    // only added here to verify that the actual
    // @EnvironmentObject store was updated
    // not needed to run
    @EnvironmentObject var store: Store

    @StateObject var viewModel: ViewModel

    var body: some View {
        Text("Hello, World!").onAppear {
            viewModel.update()
            print(store.canUpdateStore)
            // prints true
        }
    }
}

extension Child {
    final class ViewModel: ObservableObject {
        let store: StoreProtocol

        init(store: StoreProtocol) {
            self.store = store
        }

        public func update() {
            store.updateStore()
        }
    }
}


// myApp.swift

import SwiftUI

protocol StoreProtocol {
    var canUpdateStore: Bool { get }
    func updateStore() -> Void
}

class Store: ObservableObject, StoreProtocol {
    @Published private(set) var canUpdateStore: Bool = false

    func updateStore() {
        canUpdateStore = true
    }
}

@main
struct myApp: App {
    @StateObject private var store = Store()

    var body: some Scene {
        WindowGroup {
            ContentView().environmentObject(store)
        }
    }
}

This approach also allows you to mock the store via dependency injection when unit testing ChildViewModel or within the canvas previews.

There's no optionals unlike other hacky approaches that use onAppear, can run code before the onAppear is triggered and the view model is scoped only to the view that it serves.

You can also directly mutate the store within the viewModel, that works just fine too.

1
  • If you create your @StateObject when passing it to the initializer it will get recreated every time, which defeats the purpose. If you would write that initializer manually the compiler would warn you about this. – cargath May 6 at 16:22

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